Skip to main content
Courses
Voices From the Fourth Estate: Veteran Journalists and the News

Nobody seems to have a neutral opinion about journalists, particularly now. Get some first-hand insights in a five-part series in which some of the best of the best discuss life in the Washington trenches. This session features April Ryan.

Date
Tuesday, February 19, 2019 – 7:00 p.m.
Literature of the South: Defining a Genre

What do novelists like William Faulkner and Eudora Welty have in common that defines them by the honorific “Southern writer”? Lisbeth Strimple Fuisz, a lecturer in the English Department at Georgetown University, leads a 4-session course about authors whose works uniquely define what it means to write about the South. This session discusses A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest Gaines.

Date
Monday, February 25, 2019 - 6:45 p.m.
Voices From the Fourth Estate: Veteran Journalists and the News

Nobody seems to have a neutral opinion about journalists, particularly now. Get some first-hand insights in a five-part series in which some of the best of the best discuss life in the Washington trenches. This session features Paul Danahar.

Date
Tuesday, February 26, 2019 – 7:00 p.m.
The Books That Fought Slavery

The long fight against American slavery produced some of the most powerful autobiographies and works of fiction in American history. Read and discuss four 19th-century classics by men and women, both black and white, who were central figures in the struggle to destroy the institution. This session features Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

Date
Thursday, February 28, 2019 – 6:45 p.m.
The Pulse on Modern Medicine: Insights from NIH Experts

In a four-part series, listen to National Institutes of Health directors and scientific and medical experts discuss what is currently “hot” in biomedical research—and what it all means for our health and medical treatment today and in the future. This program features John Tisdale, Chief, Cellular and Molecular Therapeutics Branch, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

Date
Tuesday, March 5, 2019 - 6:45 p.m.
British Women Novelists: The Times of Their Lives

The fictional heroines of Fanny Burney, Jane Austen, Anne Bronte, and Elisabeth Gaskell navigate a world in which their choices, status, and freedom are in the hands of the men who rule it. Join Lisbeth Strimple Fuisz of Georgetown University in spirited commentary and informal discussions about four novels in which women find new ways to define themselves in England during the 18th and 19th centuries.

Date
Thursday, March 7, April 11, May 9, June 6, 2019 - 12:00 p.m.
Voices From the Fourth Estate: Veteran Journalists and the News

Nobody seems to have a neutral opinion about journalists, particularly now. Get some first-hand insights in a five-part series in which some of the best of the best discuss life in the Washington trenches. This session features Lawrence O'Donnell.

Date
Tuesday, March 12, 2019 – 7:00 p.m.
African Art Through the Centuries

From the vibrant paintings found in Stone Age caves to works of contemporary creators, the arts of Africa have been shaped by unique creative insight as well as by specific political, social, religious, and economic forces. Art historian Kevin Tervala explores these vibrant artistic expressions through an examination of the continent’s historical trajectory. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Date
Wednesday, March 27 to April 17, 2019 – 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m.
The Books That Fought Slavery

The long fight against American slavery produced some of the most powerful autobiographies and works of fiction in American history. Read and discuss four 19th-century classics by men and women, both black and white, who were central figures in the struggle to destroy the institution. This session features William Wells Brown's Clotel.

Date
Thursday, March 28, 2019 – 6:45 p.m.
Voices From the Fourth Estate: Veteran Journalists and the News

Nobody seems to have a neutral opinion about journalists, particularly now. Get some first-hand insights in a five-part series in which some of the best of the best discuss life in the Washington trenches. This session features Cokie and Steve Roberts.

Date
Tuesday, April 2, 2019 – 7:00 p.m.
Understanding Wagner

No composer changed the aesthetic landscape of the 19th century as thoroughly as did the influential and controversial Richard Wagner (1813–1883). Popular Smithsonian music lecturer Saul Lilienstein illuminates aspects of Wagner’s life, works, influence, and achievements.

Date
Tuesday, April 16 to May 21, 2019 – 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Neighborhoods of Venice, Paris, and London: Discovering Hidden Gems

Even the most-visited places can hold neighborhood treasures that only the locals know. Join Fred Plotkin on some strolls that reveal churches, theaters, specialty shops, restaurants, cafes, bars, and unusual museums just a stone’s throw from world-famous landmarks in three delightful cities. This session showcases Venice.

Date
Thursday, April 18, 2019 - 6:45 p.m.
The Books That Fought Slavery

The long fight against American slavery produced some of the most powerful autobiographies and works of fiction in American history. Read and discuss four 19th-century classics by men and women, both black and white, who were central figures in the struggle to destroy the institution. This session features Solomon Northup's Twelve Years a Slave.

Date
Thursday, April 25, 2019 – 6:45 p.m.
John Eaton: A 40th Anniversary Celebration

The pianist, vocalist, and humorist extraordinaire pays tribute to the composers whose work defines the Great American Songbook.

Date
Wednesday, May 1 to 22, 2019 - 10:15 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.
Learning To Look at Western Architecture

From Roman temples to gothic cathedrals to modernist office buildings, architecture has constantly shaped and conditioned our experience of the world. George Mason University professor Lisa Passaglia Bauman examines how architectural styles developed and interacted with culture, religion, and history over the centuries. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Date
Tuesday, May 7 to 28, 2019 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m.
Neighborhoods of Venice, Paris, and London: Discovering Hidden Gems

Even the most-visited places can hold neighborhood treasures that only the locals know. Join Fred Plotkin on some strolls that reveal churches, theaters, specialty shops, restaurants, cafes, bars, and unusual museums just a stone’s throw from world-famous landmarks in three delightful cities. This session showcases Paris.

Date
Thursday, May 16, 2019 - 6:45 p.m.
Neighborhoods of Venice, Paris, and London: Discovering Hidden Gems

Even the most-visited places can hold neighborhood treasures that only the locals know. Join Fred Plotkin on some strolls that reveal churches, theaters, specialty shops, restaurants, cafes, bars, and unusual museums just a stone’s throw from world-famous landmarks in three delightful cities. This session showcases London.

Date
Thursday, June 27, 2019 - 6:45 p.m.