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Smithsonian Associates - Entertaining, Informative, Eclectic, Insightful

Lectures

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, April 19, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

Joe Biden is facing one of the most challenging and polarized political environments ever experienced by a new president. How well has he been doing? Journalist and historian Ken Walsh looks at the high and low points of the new presidency so far as he reviews Biden’s first 100 days in office.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, April 20, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Great art is timeless. Paul Glenshaw explores one of the most iconic patriotic images in American art—and one of the most reproduced—to reveal a surprising history that includes its creation in, of all places, Germany.  (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, April 20, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

Ever since its appearance around the fifth century B.C., the philosophy of The Art of War has been embraced by leaders of nations, armies, and businesses as an ancient guide to success. Historian Christopher Hamner examines the delights and frustrations of untangling Sun Tzu’s sometimes-opaque aphorisms and explores some of the most famous passages in his masterwork.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, April 21, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

After enduring for so long, what made the Romanov dynasty vulnerable to come tumbling down a little more than a hundred years ago? Historian George Munro examines the policies of the rulers most responsible for the dynasty’s success in its first two centuries, the rise of Russia to an empire among the world’s first-rank powers, and the slow erosion of leadership that ultimately led to the tragic end of the Romanovs.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, April 21, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Walk the virtual red carpet with Washington City Paper film critic Noah Gittell in an evening that focuses on all things Oscar, from Academy Awards history and trivia to discussions of this unusual year's nominations and behind-the-scenes stories.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, April 22, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

Fairy tales are a profound force of storytelling, extending far beyond the nursery into film, advertising, novels, politics, propaganda, music, and more. Folklorists Sara Cleto and Brittany Warman explore these tales' two intertwining branches: traditional folkloric fairy tales and literary fairy tales.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, April 22, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. ET

What’s the secret to pairing a cocktail with just the right wickedly indulgent sweet? Two masters in composing after-dinner delights show how to make sublime confections and build expert cocktails superbly crafted for each other.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, April 23, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The second law of thermodynamics states that the universe trends toward entropy and disorder. Physicist Julian Barbour offers an intriguing new viewpoint that the law has been misapplied and that the growth of order, not chaos, determines how we experience time.

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, April 25, 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

Who doesn’t love the familiar waddle and elegant slide of the famously flightless penguins. Charles Bergman, award-winning writer and photographer, takes you on a virtual tour to the world’s wild places to meet these wonderful creatures threatened by climate change.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, April 26, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Living life like an economist, constantly weighing the costs and benefits of choices in order to arrive at the rational decision that makes the best use of resources, is not an easy thing to do. Economist Brian O’Roark moves through the decisions of life—from finding love to planning for retirement—inspired by the songs of the Beatles. 

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, April 27, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. ET

Smithsonian Gardens horticulturist Christine Price-Abelow leads a virtual spring bloom tour at the National Museum of the American Indian, providing an overview of the museum’s landscape and its evolution over the last 15 years.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, April 27, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Inevitably, life on Earth will come to an end and humans may have to find a new home planet. Geneticist and computational biologist Christopher Mason argues that the human ingenuity that has enabled us to build rockets and land on other planets can be applied to redesigning biology that will allow us to inhabit other planets.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, April 28, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

The 11,000-year old megalith Göbekli Tepe in a remote part of present-day Turkey has yet to yield definitive answers to the many questions swirling around it. Serif Yenen, a Turkish travel specialist, writer, and filmmaker, tells the story of this magnificent and mysterious built environment and what we can glean about the people who lived in a place once assumed to predate civilization.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, April 28, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

The 1783 Treaty of Paris, which formally ended the War for Independence, can be seen as a triumph for U.S. diplomacy that reset relations with Britain. Historian Richard Bell examines why the agreement also irreparably damaged the U.S.–French alliance and left Native Americans, loyalists, and fugitives from slavery to fend for themselves in a newly independent nation.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, April 28, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

When spring has sprung, nature isn’t shy about showing off how wild love blossoms in mating calls, dances, and rituals that can be found everywhere during the season. Liana Vitali, a naturalist and educator at Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary, offers a tasteful look into the world of animal and plant romance and the ways the natural world keeps buzzing.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, April 28, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

During the Gilded Age (1875-1900), the United States was on the path to becoming the most economically powerful country in the world, even as the wealth gap grew wider. Join Allen Pietrobon, an assistant professor of global affairs at Trinity Washington University and an award-winning historian, for a look back at the tumultuous time.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, April 29, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

On the eve of Arbor Day, naturalist and tree expert Melanie Choukas-Bradley presents an overview of the trees in our nation’s capital through stunning photographs of the Tidal Basin, U.S. Capitol, White House, National Arboretum, Rock Creek Park, and many other notable locations.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, April 29, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

The 1066 invasion and occupation of England by troops led by Duke William II of Normandy changed the course of history. But the Norman Conquest never should have succeeded. Historian Jennifer Paxton examines the political and military background of the Battle of Hastings, an encounter in which the future William the Conquer needed everything to go his way—and why amazingly, it did.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, April 29, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. E.T.

Celebrate Jazz Appreciation Month’s Year of the Woman with a look into the creative life of one of the style’s greatest singers, D.C.’s own Shirley Horn. Join Jessica Boykin-Settles, a voice faculty member at Howard University, as she looks at Horn’s route to fame, her jazz-world influences and collaborators, and the talent that defined this one-of-a-kind vocal icon.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, April 30, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

From her home in Florence, art historian Elaine Ruffalo traces the ascendance of Rome from the chaos of the Dark Ages to its eventual emergence as one of the most artistically dazzling of Renaissance capitals. This is Part II of a two-part series. (World Art History Certificate elective, ½ credit)

Members Only
Friday, April 30, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

In this members-only series led by veteran arts educator Roberta Gasbarre, go behind the scenes and into the working lives of some of the most intriguing people from all across the Smithsonian and Washington’s worlds of culture, science, and education. This program features John Grant, geologist, Center for Earth and Planetary Studies, National Air and Space Museum.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, May 3, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

The trauma of the slave trade forever altered Africa’s cultural history. Art historian Kevin Tervala examines the Atlantic and Indian Ocean slave trades, with a focus on how African artists—and the societies that they were a part of—reacted to the sudden and brutal disruption and transformation and depopulation of the world’s second-largest continent. He also highlights how the slave trade simultaneously brought great wealth, and with it, luxurious arts made in silver and gold. (World Art History Certificate elective, ½ credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, May 5, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

How did the name of a Continental Army general become a synonym for treason? Historian Richard Bell reconstructs the life and times of Benedict Arnold, the reasons he turned on his country, and the larger problems of betrayal and desertion that dogged George Washington’s army.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, May 6, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Explore the Netherlands’ resistance during World War II through the amazing story of three young women whose duties included explosive sabotage and face-to-face assassinations.

Members Only
Friday, May 7, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

In this members-only series led by veteran arts educator Roberta Gasbarre, go behind the scenes and into the working lives of some of the most intriguing people from all across the Smithsonian and Washington’s worlds of culture, science, and education. This program features Dana Tai Soon Burgess, choreographer in residence, National Portrait Gallery.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, May 7, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. ET

Spend a fascinating Friday evening expanding your knowledge of the world of wine as you sip along with sommelier Erik Segelbaum in a series of delectable adventures. This immersive program showcases Rhône Valley wines and includes a curated personal tasting kit to enhance the experience.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, May 11, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Vergil’s Aeneid is an epic poem that tells the story of the Trojan Aeneas, whose adventures included the founding of Rome. Join Shadi Bartsch-Zimmer, professor of classics and translator of the newest version of the Aeneid, as she defies the weight of the past and looks at the poem anew.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, May 12, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

A fascinating look at the history of movie theaters examines how the experience of moviegoing has changed over the decades—and whether movie theaters will even survive in the age of streaming services.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, May 12, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

In January 1942, a German U-boat surfaced in New York Harbor. This American oversight inspired Operation Paukenschlag, or “Drumbeat,” a little-known Nazi campaign to bring World War II to our shores. George Mason University history professor Kevin Matthews explores this little-known period of the war and how, with help from Britain’s Royal Navy and Royal Air Force, America turned back the Nazi attacks.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, May 12, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

The human mind is very good at discerning patterns in nature: shapes, symmetries, repetitions. But why? A geologist decodes some of nature’s formations—from prosaic to sublime—to provide a better understanding of our ability for pattern recognition.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, May 13, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

In the 19th century, Transcendentalism emerged as the first major American movement in arts and letters that left a lasting imprint on the nation’s mind and imagination. Richard Capobianco, a professor of philosophy at Stonehill College, examines the major themes of Transcendentalism and their far-reaching influence on American life.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, May 14, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec reveled in the circuses, dance halls, nightclubs, and brothels of fin de siècle Montmartre, his beloved bohemian world that inspired works marked by energy and sensuality, as well as candor and compassion. Art historian Joseph Cassar illuminates the artist's creative life in the colorful social and cultural milieu of Paris in the Belle Epoque. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit).

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, May 18, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Art historian Renee Gondek focuses on visual depictions of the iconic hero of the Trojan War, Achilles, to examine how the most famous of epic narratives from Classical mythology inspired centuries of creators and cultures. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, May 18, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

The National Museum of Natural History’s magnificent gems represent a glittering intersection of natural science, human history, culture, romance, artistic skill, and creativity—set against the allure of immense value and awesome beauty. Jeffrey Post, curator of the U.S. National Gem and Mineral Collection, reveals the scandals, mysteries, and human stories behind some of the world’s most famous gems.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, May 18, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

In what was called the speech of a generation, activist Tamika D. Mallory declared that “Black people are dying in a state of emergency” at a Minneapolis press conference following the killing of George Floyd. Drawing on her new book, she discusses the history of systemic racism in America and puts forward a vision for effective activism and lasting, positive change.

Course
Wednesday, May 19, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

There are songs so familiar they seem part of us. In this series with writer and filmmaker Sara Lukinson, find out how some our favorites from the American songbook came to be and how they speak to generations of listeners. This session highlights Somewhere Over the Rainbow and You’ll Never Walk Alone.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, May 19, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

What keeps Dante’s Divine Comedy still meaningful today, even though it was written seven centuries ago? Explore Dante’s epic poem in all its cultural and historical richness—without the need of footnotes—and discover the ways his timeless wisdom and insights can enhance our everyday lives.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, May 19, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

CNN anchor Jake Tapper called on his inside knowledge of Washington’s workings to write his newest period political thriller The Devil May Dance, in which Congressman Charlie Marder and his wife Margaret find themselves launched into the dark side of 1960s Hollywood on a dangerous assignment from Attorney General Robert Kennedy. Join him as he discusses mixing politicos and the Rat Pack in his book, as well as his work covering the non-fictional Washington.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, May 20, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Great art is timeless, and speaks to us across time, culture, and space. Artist and educator Paul Glenshaw looks at one of the most iconic images of the French Revolution as he delves into the time of the artist and explores what shaped David’s vision. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, May 20, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

During the 1920s and 1930s, Cairo’s lively music, theater, film, and cabaret scene was dominated by women who were entrepreneurs and owners as well as celebrities. Discover the rich histories of the independent figures who offered a new vision for women in Egypt and throughout the Middle East.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, May 25, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

In recent decades it has become acceptable to believe that greed is good and can be a productive force for good. But does the capitalist model for accumulating wealth force us to choose between the useful and the good? Steven M. Emmanuel asserts that the Buddha speaks directly to the benefits and the dangers of wealth acquisition as it pertains to happiness.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, May 25, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

In a two-part series, Jon Grinspan, curator of political history at the Smithsonian’s American History Museum, delves into the deep and sometimes wild history of American democracy to uncover a period of extreme division in the late 1800s. This session focuses on political struggles from the Civil War into the 1890s.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, May 26, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Met Cloisters curator Barbara Drake Boehm provides a fresh interpretation of the complex imagery woven into the iconic medieval Unicorn Tapestries. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, May 26, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Learn how 19th-century Prussian naturalist Alexander von Humboldt’s conversations about the arts, science, politics, and exploration with figures such as President Thomas Jefferson and artist Charles Willson Peale had a lasting influence on American art, culture, and understanding of the natural world.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, May 26, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Space historian and television host Amy Shira Teitel tells the fascinating story of two women pilots who spent years as adversaries in search of the same goal: creating a place for women in the male-dominated arena of aviation and space flight.

Members Only
Friday, May 28, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

In this members-only series led by veteran arts educator Roberta Gasbarre, go behind the scenes and into the working lives of some of the most intriguing people from all across the Smithsonian and Washington’s worlds of culture, science, and education. This program features Monica Mohindra, head of program coordination and communication, Veterans History Project, Library of Congress.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, May 28, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

As ruler of the Ottoman Empire in the 15th century, Sultan Mehmed II viewed himself as a new Roman emperor. To reflect that power and prestige he required an appropriate symbol: the magnificent Topkapi Palace in Istanbul. Join Serif Yenen, a tour guide and guidebook author, for an exploration of the dazzling palace—including its fabled hidden sections—and stories about the lifestyles of the sultans who inhabited it. (World Art History certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, June 1, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

In a two-part series, Jon Grinspan, curator of political history at the Smithsonian’s American History Museum, delves into the deep and sometimes wild history of American democracy to uncover a period of extreme division in the late 1800s. This session focuses on political reforms put in place in the 20th century.

Course
Wednesday, June 2, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. and 1:15 p.m. ET

There are songs so familiar they seem part of us. In this series with writer and filmmaker Sara Lukinson, find out how some our favorites from the American songbook came to be and how they speak to generations of listeners. This session highlights This Land Is Your Land and Bridge Over Troubled Water.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, June 2, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

We loved watching TV series "Downton Abbey" and its glimpses into Edwardian lives. Historian Julie Taddeo looks beyond the show’s period fashions and lavish sets to consider its historical accuracy and what it says about the 21st century.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, June 2, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Spices are the fastest, easiest way to make a good dish a spectacular one, according to spice expert and professional chef Lior Lev Sercarz. He explains how to create spice blends, how to cook with them, and demonstrates the preparation of a spicy summer dinner.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, June 3, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Join Linette Dutari, associate director of communications at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute live from Panama for an engaging program about STRI’s ground-breaking research on tropical forests and marine ecosystems and their astounding biodiversity.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, June 3, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

To fight the challenges of racism and white supremacy today, we must understand their origins, reminds medievalist Paul B. Sturtevant. Join him as he uncovers the thousand-year-old lineage of a very modern problem.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, June 4, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. ET

Join naturalist Keith Tomlinson for a virtual tour with an emphasis on adventuring. Located just three hours west of Washington in the eastern panhandle of West Virginia, the beautiful highlands of Spruce Knob-Seneca Rocks National Recreation Area offer outdoor lovers an ideal setting for exploration.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, June 4, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. ET

Spend a fascinating Friday evening expanding your knowledge of the world of wine as you sip along with sommelier Erik Segelbaum in a series of delectable adventures. This immersive program focuses on Charonnay and Pinot Noir wines and includes a curated personal tasting kit to enhance the experience.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, June 7, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

Admiral William H. McRaven, U.S. Navy (Ret.) talks about what it means to be a hero. Given his record of service to his country as leader of the United States Special Operations Command, it’s not a cliché to say it takes one to know one.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, June 7, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

Join architect Travis Price in a discussion of modern architecture and what it says about our natural environment, the cultures within it, and the materials we use to create it.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, June 8, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

Thousands of life-size terra-cotta figures were buried to accompany China’s first emperor, Qin Shi Huangdi, in the afterlife. Learn how the 3rd-century B.C. ruler shaped the visible expression of Chinese imperial power with a legacy that includes glittering palaces, sweeping defensive walls, and stunning artwork, along with the buried warriors. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, June 9, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The Mouse rules! Over the last nine decades, the Walt Disney Company has transformed every facet of the entertainment business. Author Brian Rose examines the secrets behind the development of this still-growing powerhouse, tracing the remarkable evolution of a small cartoon studio in 1923 into the most powerful force in worldwide media today.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, June 9, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

Dead Sea Scrolls scholar Gary Rendsburg describes the discovery of these precious fragments and their influence on the development of both ancient Judaism and early Christianity.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, June 9, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

David Eisenhower, director of the Institute for Public Service at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, examines Operation Overlord, the daring cross-Channel invasion that was a meticulously detailed plan—and a logistical nightmare.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, June 10, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

You can’t visit Italy right now—but you can join art historian and culinary expert Elaine Trigiani at her farmhouse in Tuscany for a virtual exploration of Calabria—the toe of Italy’s boot—through a vivid look at its artistic and culinary heritage. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, June 10, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

It’s only natural to ask “Why?” in the face of life’s most complex questions and then come up with the answers. Evolutionary biologist Rui Diogo takes a scientific look at how humans have long made sense of their worlds, and suggests there’s a more rational and empirical question to ask in our quest for understanding: How?

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, June 10, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. ET

The oyster is one of the most enduring symbols of the Chesapeake Bay. But in the mid-19th century through the 1950s, oyster pirates, legal watermen, and authorities engaged in violent disputes. Historian Dakota Springston examines how the Oyster Wars led to the oyster’s near extinction, and eventually, protection.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, June 11, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

In the 11th century, Pisa was a thriving city and a maritime power. Lucca later emerged as one of the region’s trading centers. Join Renaissance art historian Elaine Ruffolo for an incisive look at these cities’ influence on the development of art and architecture in the Mediterranean region. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, June 12, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Historian Jennifer Paxton examines the history behind Shakespeare’s history plays and explores the fascinating ways in which he did—and did not—depart from what his contemporaries knew about their own past both to entertain his audience and to comment on the politics of his own day.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, June 14, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Washington, D.C., is Indian land. The city is built on the traditional ancestral homelands of the Piscataway and Anacostan peoples. Join Elizabeth Rule, director of the AT&T Center for Indigenous Politics and Policy at George Washington University, to explore the history and legacy of Native Americans in the nation’s capital, as well as a new digital guide and mobile app that maps local sites of Indigenous importance.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, June 15, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Discover the visual splendor and spiritual power of Byzantine art with art historian Judy Scott Feldman, from the jewel-like mosaics of Ravenna to the dazzling domed interior of Hagia Sophia and the penetrating stare of holy figures in Orthodox icons. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Wednesday, June 16, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

There are songs so familiar they seem part of us. In this series with writer and filmmaker Sara Lukinson, find out how some of our favorites from the American songbook came to be and how they speak to generations of listeners. This session highlights Summertime and My Favorite Things.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, June 16, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

One of the most sought-after vocal coaches in Hollywood, Denise Woods shares proven, practical, and invaluable tools to change both how we communicate and ultimately how we see ourselves.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, June 16, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. ET

The extensive journals that chronicle the Lewis and Clark expedition’s trek from St. Louis to the Pacific and back offer a vivid look at one of the most remarkable adventures in American history. Clay Jenkinson, a preeminent Lewis and Clark and Jefferson scholar, examines the dynamics of the journals, how they were written, and what they included in their entries—and what they did not—to offer a deeper understanding of the greatest land exploration in North America.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

Stopping the dissemination of fake news, misinformation, and disinformation campaigns continues to be a Herculean task. An expert discusses how to identify and combat fake news—and how to resist becoming a victim of misinformation.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, June 22, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

Are you worried about your memory, or someone else’s? Understand more about how memory works and how you might optimize yours from Barry Gordon, a nationally recognized expert on memory and memory disorders. It is an evening you won’t forget.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, June 23, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

His role as Union Army quartermaster general is well known, but Montgomery Meigs was also an engineer, architect, inventor, and patron of the arts who left an indelible impression on the face of the capital city. Historian Bill Keene offers a virtual tour of sites in the Washington area associated with Meigs in his role of engineer and architect.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, June 23, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

At the height of the Cold War, President John F. Kennedy saw outer space exploration as a race for survival—and America was losing to the Soviet Union. Author Jeff Shesol examines why John Glenn’s February 1962 mission into space had greater goals than circling the planet: It was to calm the fears of the free world and renew America’s sense of self-belief.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, June 24, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Looking for some refreshing cocktail ideas for warm summer evenings? Author and cocktail historian Philip Greene demonstrates how to make classics like the Tom Collins, Mojito, Southside, Daiquiri, and Jack Rose. He also mixes in the drinks’ histories and folklore. 

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, June 24, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. ET

Do you wish you knew more about those intriguing-looking birds you spot in your backyard or on your walks?  Matt Felperin, NOVA Parks’ roving naturalist, offers an essential guide on what you see and hear designed for both beginning birders and those who want to take their skills to the next level.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, June 25, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The artist Raphael arrived in Rome in 1508 and brought a subtle revolution in art and architecture to the Eternal City. Join art historian Elaine Ruffolo for a virtual visit to the papal apartments—Stanze—Raphael painted, and revel in his virtuosity. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, June 26, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Historian and scholar Michele L. Simms-Burton, a former professor of African-American studies at Howard University examines the creators and the works that came alive during one of the most creative and intellectually productive eras in African American history, the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. ET

Art historian Aneta Georgevskia-Shine discusses ways of approaching Hieronymus Bosch (1450–1516), a unique artist who continues to fascinate us with the fantastic imagery and densely symbolic messages of his compositions. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Tues., June 29, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The Borgias’ name has become synonymous with blind ambition, murder, rape, incest, and torture in Renaissance Italy. But there was something more to know about them, and art historian Elizabeth Lev provides a broader context to the powerful family’s story.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, July 16, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. ET

Spend a fascinating Friday evening expanding your knowledge of the world of wine as you sip along with sommelier Erik Segelbaum in a series of delectable adventures. This immersive program focuses on wine favorites from the pros and includes a curated personal tasting kit to enhance the experience.