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All upcoming Lectures

All upcoming Lectures

Showing programs 1 to 10 of 93
February 22, 2024

Over more than a century, three generations of Wyeths of Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, have created a collective portrait of America. Art historian Bonita Billman traces the family tradition reflected in their disparate subjects and styles. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


February 22, 2024

Did you know that your morning cup of coffee has the power to protect birds—or to destroy their habitat? Ruth Bennett, a Smithsonian research ecologist, journeys south to the coffee farms responsible for migratory songbird survival, exploring why some farmers are actively protecting bird habitats by growing coffee under native shade trees, while others are eliminating their winter habitat by cutting down cloud forest to grow more coffee. She also reports on how the Smithsonian is creating a market for coffee brands carrying its Bird Friendly certification.


February 23, 2024

The Rhône Valley is home to some of the world's most iconic appellations such as Hermitage and Châteauneuf-du-Pape. As sommelier Erik Segelbaum leads tastings of multiple expressions from across the region, learn why wines from this beautiful area of France are food-friendly favorites of sommeliers the world over. The immersive program includes a curated personal tasting kit to enhance the experience.


February 25, 2024

Over the course of the last century, the work of two architectural giants, Frank Lloyd Wright and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, responded to nature in very different ways influencing other architects as well as builders and clients. In a three-part series, architectural professionals examine how contemporary architecture draws on the legacies of these groundbreakers in structures that integrate nature and eco-friendly considerations into their designs. This session highlights Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


February 26, 2024

The disenchantment of modern times is often reflected in art that mires the spirit in darkness. But artists of other eras chose to confront the dark side of their world with the compelling force of wonder despite the inequality, poverty, and violence that surrounded them. Art historian Liz Lev highlights how creators like Giotto, Bernini, and Monet wrestled with their own catastrophic times to instill hope and spark amazement. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


February 26, 2024

As a framework for negotiations between Israel and Palestine, the 1993 Oslo Accords were intended to last five years. But grim conflicts have persisted for more than three decades, with genuine peace remaining elusive. Historian Ralph Nurnberger unravels the intricate web of secret diplomacy, alternating periods of hope and despair, and the conflicting goals and objectives among supporters and opponents of the Oslo Peace Process.


February 27, 2024

For nearly a century, Hollywood has been captivated by the allure of the Broadway musical. Most of the Great White Way’s biggest hits have made the transfer to the movie theater, though sometimes the journey has yielded damaged goods. Media historian Brian Rose looks at this colorful history, including glorious reinterpretations like Milos Forman’s Hair and Steven Spielberg’s remake of West Side Story.


February 27, 2024

During the 1830s, many thousands of Native Americans were expelled from their homelands in the Southeast and forced to migrate to land west of the Mississippi. An estimated one-fourth of the 16,000 people on the 800-mile journey of the Cherokee Nation to Oklahoma died, one reason the Cherokees remember the “Trail of Tears.” Historian Rowena McClinton discusses the chain of events behind this forced removal.


February 28, 2024

The name Bloomsbury conjures up an image of early 20th-century bohemia whose literati included Virginia Woolf. But artists also were in the circle, and Woolf’s sister Vanessa Bell, critic and painter Roger Fry, Duncan Grant, and Dora Carrington formed the nucleus of visual Bloomsbury. Curator Nancy Green delves into this tight-knit group of artists and friends and their place in the pantheon of 20th-century Modernism. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


February 29, 2024

During the Cold War, novels, essays, and poems could win the hearts and minds of those caught between the competing creeds of capitalism and communism. They could also lead to blacklisting, exile, imprisonment, or execution for their authors if they offended those in power. Cultural historian Duncan White introduces the key literary conflicts that animated the Cold War from the beginning of the Spanish Civil War to the collapse of the Berlin Wall.