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All upcoming Daytime programs

All upcoming Daytime programs

Showing programs 1 to 10 of 53
Session 1 of 5
May 28, 2024

Stravinsky’s spectacular early ballet scores such as Le Sacre du Printemps can distract us from where this prolific artist went next. Classical music and opera expert Saul Lilienstein examines a selection of classically inspired masterworks spanning 1918 through 1951—from L’Histoire du Soldat to The Rake’s Progress. Film excerpts of Stravinsky in conversation with other artists enhance the portrait of the man and the conductor.


May 29, 2024

Filmmaker and cultural historian Sara Lukinson explores more glorious songs from the Great American Songbook with stories about their long, often-unexpected lives. The spring lineup covers songs that are considered “simply the best”—ageless and favorite beauties by Lerner and Loewe.


May 30, 2024

For historians like Megan Kate Nelson, the “archive,” usually a library, university, museum, or historical society collection, is a sacred place. But what happens when these sources don’t contain the answers they seek? Nelson unfolds three research adventures that led her to places beyond the traditional archives—including a mountain pass in New Mexico—during her preparation for The Three-Cornered War, a book about the Civil War in the desert Southwest.


May 31, 2024

Jesus Christ is an instantly recognizable figure, perhaps the most frequently depicted in all Western art. Since scripture does not provide a description of what Christ looked like, painters and mosaic-makers would often resort to the artistic canons of their time to create an image of the Nazarene. Renaissance art historian Elaine Ruffolo delves into some of the most impactful portrayals of Christ, uncovering how social, political, and religious contexts directly shaped the iconic image we recognize today. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Session 2 of 5
June 4, 2024

Stravinsky’s spectacular early ballet scores such as Le Sacre du Printemps can distract us from where this prolific artist went next. Classical music and opera expert Saul Lilienstein examines a selection of classically inspired masterworks spanning 1918 through 1951—from L’Histoire du Soldat to The Rake’s Progress. Film excerpts of Stravinsky in conversation with other artists enhance the portrait of the man and the conductor.


June 5, 2024
In-Person
$100 - $130

In colloquial Lebanese Arabic, “ilili” means “tell me”—and it’s always an invitation. Take advantage of your invitation to visit The Wharf in Southwest Washington and break fresh pita at ilili DC in a three-course lunch designed exclusively for Smithsonian Associates. Executive chef Satinder Vij is on hand to introduce the menu, which includes mezze, an entrée, and dessert.


June 6, 2024

Famous since the late 1920s, a century later Georgia O’Keeffe remains an icon of American art. Art historian Bonita Billman traces O’Keeffe’s life and artistic career from her upbringing in rural Wisconsin to her association with New York City’s avant-garde circle of the ’20s to her years in New Mexico, where the desert opened a new range of subject matter for her work. She also looks at the influences on O’Keeffe—including fellow artist Arthur Wesley Dow, who taught her the importance of “filling a space in a beautiful way,” and her husband, gallerist and photographer Alfred Stieglitz. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


June 7, 2024

In the latter part of his career Michelangelo undertook remarkable architectural ventures, including projects for his childhood friends, the Medici Popes Leo X and Clement VII. However, the relationship turned sour when Michelangelo joined Florentine forces attempting to throw off the yoke of the ruling family. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo takes a close look at Michelangelo's projects for the Medici popes and the tumultuous events­—including a death warrant—that unfolded along the way. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


June 7, 2024

In the early 20th century, a group of Italian artists sought to embrace modernity in all its glorious messiness and contradictions. The result was Futurism, not a style but a way of looking at life. Its adherents called for abrupt change and the replacement of reason and order with vitality and force of will. Art historian Mary Ann Calo examines Futurism as both an idea and a development in the visual arts. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


June 10, 2024

Join curator Elizabeth Lay Little for an image-rich late spring lunchtime series focusing on decorative arts and design topics. This session explores why younger collectors aren’t eager to inherit their parents’ antiques with antique dealer Taylor Thistlethwaite. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)