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Streaming Programs

Your newest link to our world of learning

Welcome to Smithsonian Associates Streaming, a new digital platform for the high-quality, engaging and varied programs that you’ve come to expect from us.

We invite you to join us from the comfort of your home as we present individual programs, multi-part courses, studio arts classes, and virtual study tours inspired by the Smithsonian’s research, collections and exhibitions. We’re excited to present this new aspect of our 55 years as the world’s largest museum-based educational program—and to have you be an important part of our future growth.

Explore all our offerings in this month's digital program guide.

Lecture/Seminar

The Jacobites’ Legacy: From Bonnie Prince Charlie to Outlander

Monday, December 5, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Historian Jennifer Paxton examines how a dispute between rival branches of the English royal dynasty dominated English and European politics for nearly a century and has inspired popular culture on both sides of the Atlantic, from the novels of Sir Walter Scott in the 19th century to the current Outlander novels and television series.


Lecture/Seminar

In Search of Sacred Sites

Monday, December 5, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

In-Person and Online Program: For the past 40 years, documentary photographer, filmmaker, and National Geographic Society Explorer Chris Rainier has been in search of the sacred and the very meaning of sacredness. Rainier shares his discoveries from that exploration as he leads a visual journey into a world of spiritual landscapes and sacred sites around the globe, combining powerful and haunting images with insights from leading authors, spiritual thinkers, indigenous elders, explorers, and religious scholars.


Lecture/Seminar

An American Ambassador in Prewar Japan: The Countdown to Pearl Harbor

Monday, December 5, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

As America’s ambassador to Japan in the decade that led up to WWII, Joseph C. Grew’s prescient warnings to American leaders about the risks of Japan’s raging nationalism and ambitious militarism were often disregarded in Washington. Author Steve Kemper examines Grew’s tenure in Japan, offering a backstage glimpse at these explosive years from vantage points including the Imperial Palace, the Japanese cabinet, and Grew’s own perspective from the American embassy in Tokyo.


Lecture/Seminar

Winter Wisdom: A Reflective Writing Workshop

Tuesday, December 6, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover the power of reflective writing guided by the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, Mary Hall Surface. Inspired by Claude Monet’s The Magpie and two winter poems by Mary Oliver, you’ll explore the lessons that the season offers us when we slow down, look closely, and reflect.


Lecture/Seminar

Lost Civilizations: Egypt

Tuesday, December 6, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

From Roman villas to Hollywood films, ancient Egypt has been a source of fascination and inspiration in many other cultures. Christina Riggs, professor of the history of visual culture at Durham University, examines its history, art, and religion to illuminate why ancient Egypt has been so influential throughout the centuries—revealing how the past has always been used to serve contemporary purposes.


Lecture/Seminar

Gulliver's Travels: A Satire Not Just for Children

Tuesday, December 6, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Though often regarded as a children’s book, Gulliver's Travels is filled with Jonathan Swift’s “savage indignation” at the problems in the human character and offers a witty, enchanting, and unrelenting critique of the optimism of the Enlightenment. Learn why humanities scholar Clay Jenkinson considers it a work of genius as he leads a journey into the dark recesses of the severest satirist in the English language.


Lecture/Seminar

Yuletide in Dixie: Slavery, Christmas, and Southern Memory

Tuesday, December 6, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

The conventional wisdom that Christmas provided enslaved African Americans in the Civil War era with a respite from labor and punishment is wrong, says historian Robert E. May. He examines how slavery’s most punitive features persisted at holiday time and how false assumptions about slave Christmases later became harnessed to cultural myths that undergirded white supremacy in the United States.


Course

UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Wednesday, December 7, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The 1,121 UNESCO World Heritage sites throughout the world provide fascinating glimpses into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. In a lavishly illustrated series, historian Justin M. Jacobs offers an in-depth overview of two particularly intriguing UNESCO World Heritage sites. This session focuses on the Great Wall of China.


Lecture/Seminar

Birding in a Winter Wonderland

Wednesday, December 7, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Not all birds fly south for the winter: Many species find their way to homes in temperate North America. Naturalist Matt Felperin shares valuable tips on how to the make the most of winter birding in the mid-Atlantic region and why it’s one of the most rewarding and magical times for spotting seasonal visitors from ducks and geese to songbirds and raptors.


Studio Arts Workshop

Modern Evergreen Wreath

Wednesday, December 7, 2022 - 7:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Just in time for the holidays, create a modern wreath design with fresh evergreens on a metal hoop.  Using a method similar to floral arrangement, combine local textures, shapes, and colors in your design.


Lecture/Seminar

The Escape Artist: A Warning from Auschwitz

Thursday, December 8, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

In April 1944, Rudolf Vrba became the first Jew to break out of Auschwitz, driven to reveal the truth of the death camp to the world and to warn the last Jews of Europe what fate awaited them. Though too few—including world leaders—heeded his warning, Vrba helped save 200,000 Jewish lives. Author Jonathan Freedland recounts the extraordinary story of a man he feels deserves to take his place as one of a handful of individuals whose experiences define our understanding of the Holocaust.


Lecture/Seminar

Rediscovering Botticelli’s Lost Drawings—and the Renaissance

Thursday, December 8, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

The 19th-century rediscovery of Sandro Botticelli’s drawings illustrating The Divine Comedy reminded the art world of how the artist’s work embodies the spirit of the Renaissance. Joseph Luzzi of Bard College explains how and why Botticelli’s creations from the beauty of Primavera and the Birth of Venus to the drama of Dante’s Purgatorio—still move us today. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

The Rothschilds: From Frankfurt’s Judengasse to Bankers to the World

Thursday, December 8, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

They spent centuries confined to the Judengasse ghetto in Frankfurt, earning a living peddling goods. But the Rothschild family moved past antisemitism, emerging as one of the world's wealthiest and most influential banking dynasties. Historian Ralph Nurnberger recounts their rags-to-riches story.


Studio Arts Workshop

Mini Watercolor Painting Workshop

Thursday, December 8, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Students work in miniature—3 in. x 5 in. or smaller—to paint watercolors perfect for framing, or to give as a special card to a friend or loved one.


Studio Arts Workshop

Orchids for the Holidays

Friday, December 9, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET

Take a break from the stress of the season to enjoy an entertaining and informative afternoon with an orchid expert and come away with an elegant orchid centerpiece.


Lecture/Seminar

The Barnes Foundation Philadelphia

Friday, December 9, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

The Barnes is often considered the greatest post-impressionist and early-modern art collection in the world. Join Barnes Foundation educator Penny Hansen as she covers its history and uses unique high-definition Deep Zoom technology to offer closeup looks at masterpieces that reveal their surfaces and details in ways that bring the art and the artists to vivid life. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

A Traveler's Guide to the Stars: The Possibilities of Interstellar Exploration

Friday, December 9, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

The age-old dream of venturing forth into the cosmos and even colonizing distant worlds may one day become a reality. Physicist, author, and NASA technologist Les Johnson reveals the physics and technologies that may enable us to reach the stars.


Studio Arts Workshop

White-Line Woodblock Printing II

Saturday, December 10, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Learn a variety of advanced techniques as you create multiple prints from your favorite white-line woodcut block.


Lecture/Seminar

Decking the Halls at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue

Sunday, December 11, 2022 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Author and historian Coleen Christian Burke, a 2014 White House design partner, leads a journey through Christmas history as she reveals how the annual decorating themes developed by first ladies are turned into sparkling realities. She also discusses how the holiday White House functions as both a private home and public space and offers views of some of the most memorable seasonal settings created at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.


Lecture/Seminar

Building St. Peter's Basilica

Monday, December 12, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

After 100 years of construction, the reign of 18 different popes, and the direction of 12 different architects, St. Peter’s Basilica was finally completed in 1626. Rocky Ruggiero, an architectural historian and specialist in the Italian Renaissance, explores the dramatic construction history of this great church and the breathtaking artwork by artists such as Michelangelo and Bernini that adorns it. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

Winter Wisdom: A Reflective Writing Workshop

Tuesday, December 13, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover the power of reflective writing guided by the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, Mary Hall Surface. Inspired by Claude Monet’s The Magpie and two winter poems by Mary Oliver, you’ll explore the lessons that the season offers us when we slow down, look closely, and reflect.


Course

Favorite Movies: Glamour, Mystery, Corruption, and Unexpected Love

Tuesday, December 13, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Our favorite moments in films never leave us. In a fall series, Emmy-winning documentary filmmaker and writer Sara Lukinson revisits more of our favorite movies and characters, the people who dreamed them up, and the lasting memories they made in our lives and our myths. This session showcases these films: Moonstruck and Notting Hill.


Lecture/Seminar

Lost Civilizations: The Incas

Tuesday, December 13, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The Inca were the last major civilization of the Andes, the descendant of a human presence in the region dating back millennia. Kevin Lane, archaeologist and senior researcher at CONICET Universidad de Buenos Aires, analyzes the Inca rise to power, highlighting the social, economic, cultural, dynastic, and military reasons behind the emergence of their imperial hegemony throughout western South America.


Course

UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Wednesday, December 14, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The 1,121 UNESCO World Heritage sites throughout the world provide fascinating glimpses into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. In a lavishly illustrated series, historian Justin M. Jacobs offers an in-depth overview two particularly intriguing UNESCO World Heritage sites. This session focuses on the Sacred Buddhist Landscape of Bagan.


Lecture/Seminar

Los Angeles: Portrait of a Mature Metropolis

Wednesday, December 14, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

In the decades following World War II, a myriad of factors shaped modern Los Angeles, including the growth of industry, the evolution of the entertainment business, and the city’s transformation into the home of notable cultural and educational institutions. Bill Keene, a lecturer in history, urban studies, and architecture, examines the social and economic forces that made Los Angeles the powerhouse it is today.


Lecture/Seminar

Spices 101: Cinnamon

Thursday, December 15, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

The spice we love in apple pie, tagines, and churros has been treasured across cultures since ancient times, and used for culinary, medicinal, and spiritual purposes—even including ancient Egyptian embalming methods. Christine Rai explores cinnamon’s fascinating origins, history, and variety, and shares tips on using the spice in your own kitchen.


Lecture/Seminar

The Magic of Fred Astaire

Thursday, December 15, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Whether it was partnering with Ginger Rogers, Rita Hayworth, Cyd Charisse, or a hat rack, Fred Astaire on film made everything appear easy and elegant. In a delightful program illustrated with video clips, media expert Brian Rose surveys the sweep of Astaire’s remarkable career, looking at his work both as a soloist and as the most romantic dance partner in Hollywood history.


Studio Arts Workshop

Drawing on Toned Paper: Winter Botanicals

Thursday, December 15, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Feel free to draw on your personal style in this sketching workshop. The class is for students of all levels who would like to try a new way of recording winter botanicals.


Lecture/Seminar

How Weather Has Shaped Human History

Thursday, December 15, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Dramatic weather might seem to be a new phenomenon, but weather and climate change have been shaping human history for thousands of years. Historian Caroline Winterer examines a series of weather-driven turning points that were strong enough to force migration, end wars, and create famines—and how the aftermath of past climate change might affect our future.


Lecture/Seminar

Donatello: Artist of the Florentine Renaissance

Friday, December 16, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

A technical master, Donatello broke new ground in the methods he used and the forms he chose to develop, leaving behind a legacy of creations that seem startlingly modern. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo highlights the life and work of this artist who embodied the ideas of the Renaissance in sculpture. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

France’s Hidden Gems: Drink Like a French Sommelier

Friday, December 16, 2022 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Sommelier Erik Segelbaum guides you through a tour-de-force presentation of some of the most incredible yet lesser-known wines and regions of France. On this journey off the beaten path, you’re sure to discover some of the most exciting wines France produces.


Lecture/Seminar

From Carson to Oprah to Stephen Colbert: A History of the TV Talk Show

Thursday, January 5, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

From its start in the early 1950s, the talk show has been one of television’s most versatile and durable formats. Media expert Brian Rose surveys its changing appeal from decade to decade and examines how the talk show—and its hosts—continue to provide viewers with a lively mix of entertainment, information, and compelling conversation.


Lecture/Seminar

Frederic Church's Olana: A Masterwork of American Landscape and Design

Friday, January 6, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Olana, the Hudson Valley home of 19th-century landscape artist Frederic Church might be his most enduring masterwork. Sean Sawyer, president of the Olana Partnership, provides an overview of Church’s creation and leads a virtual tour of the landscape and main house, with its rich collection of fine and decorative arts that reflect the global reach of Church's travels and vision.


Lecture/Seminar

The Geology of Western National Parks: Big Bend, Texas

Monday, January 9, 2023 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Join geologist Kirt Kempter as he explores the geology of Western National Parks over the course of 2023, with an in-depth look at one location every month. He kicks off the series with a focus on parks in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. This program spotlights Big Bend National Park in Texas.


Course

Write Into Art: Creative Writing Inspired by Visual Art

Tuesday, January 10, 2023 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for five online workshops that spotlight a diverse range of visual art chosen to inspire writers of all experience levels to deepen their process and practice. This writing session is inspired by Kenjiro Nomura’s The Farm.


Course

The Women Who Made Art History: From the Renaissance to the 21st Century

Tuesday, January 10, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

For centuries, women were conspicuously underrepresented in—and indeed almost absent from—art history books. Art historian Judy Pomerantz examines the role women have played in Western visual arts from the Renaissance to the present through an exploration of the works and lives of female artists who made significant marks on the art of their time and on the course of art history. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)


Course

For the Love of Schubert

Tuesday, January 10, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

He was the first of the true Romantic composers and possessed an effortless melodic gift that has stirred lovers of music for 200 years. Opera expert Saul Lilienstein provides a chronological overview of Franz Schubert’s life and great achievements.


Lecture/Seminar

Tutankhamun and the Tomb that Changed the World

Tuesday, January 10, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

In an exciting new look at the life and tomb of King Tutankhamun, Bob Brier, a specialist in ancient Egypt, explores the 100 years of research on Tutankhamun that have taken place since the tomb's discovery in 1922.


Lecture/Seminar

Casanova's Venice

Wednesday, January 11, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The 17th-century Venice of Casanova endured a period of decline and decadence amid a spectacular cultural flowering. Using his story as a jumping off point, historian Monica Chojnack explores this tumultuous time and the ways in which Venetians responded socially, politically, and artistically to the end of the Renaissance and the birth of a new era.


Lecture/Seminar

The Transformation of Christ in Art: From the Catacombs to Caravaggio

Wednesday, January 11, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

The depiction of Jesus in Western art underwent dramatic transformation from the earliest known images through the Baroque period of early modernity. Historian Cheryl White examines the unique social and artistic influences that shaped these diverse representations and progressions of Christ’s images across time. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

Ian Fleming: The Creator of James Bond

Wednesday, January 11, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

You might call Ian Fleming—who introduced a British Secret Service agent named James Bond to the world with Casino Royale in 1952—The Man with the Golden Typewriter. The 14 Bond books he authored sparked a global sensation, sold tens of millions of copies, and became the source for the longest-running film franchise in history. In an evening in the dashing Bond spirit, author Daniel Stashower explores Ian Fleming’s life and legacy, while actor Scott Sedar, aka The Man with the Golden Voice, reads from Fleming’s most popular works.


Lecture/Seminar

“Ike”: Eisenhower from D-Day to the Defeat of Hitler’s Germany

Thursday, January 12, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

One man deserves credit for turning American, British, Canadian, Free French, Polish, and other Allied military commands into a single fighting force: Dwight Eisenhower. Historian Kevin Matthews examines how Eisenhower contended with rival armies, navies, and air forces to lead not as an “American general” but as an “Allied general,” which provided him with a unique insight that led to the ultimate victory.


Course

The Best of Ballet Music: The Soul of Movement

Thursday, January 12, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Ballet is a unique experience in performance art, but what really takes it to its greatest heights is the musical score. In a 2-session introduction, popular speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin uses her unique live piano demonstrations and both historic and contemporary film clips to illustrate how the music from dance masterpieces became a treasured part of our cultural landscape.


Lecture/Seminar

Spanish Art and Architecture: A Treasury of Delights

Friday, January 13, 2023 - 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

The art and architecture of Spain as seen in the works of El Greco, Goya, Velazquez, Picasso, and Gaudi offer a window into the influences that define the country's history and national identity. Art historian Joseph Cassar highlights artists and structures that exemplify Spain’s distinctive cultural heritage. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

Mid-century Modern: Sleek, Stylish, and Accessible

Friday, January 13, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

There’s much more to the Mid-century Modern movement than just the iconic buildings it inspired. The style was spread by design principles and color palettes that saturated everything from kitchen appliances to advertising to airline paint schemes. Lecturer Bill Keene examines the architecture and the wider implications of the broad scope of Mid-century Modern design trends and developments.


Lecture/Seminar

Reading and Understanding James Joyce’s Ulysses

Saturday, January 14, 2023 - 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Take a deep dive into this fascinating novel with Joseph Luzzi, unpacking its mysteries and exploring its insights on a dizzying array of subjects: from ancient literature and modern fiction to Irish politics, Joyce’s own “exilic” biography, and the vigorous literary avant-garde of the early 20th century.


Course

Write Into Art: Creative Writing Inspired by Visual Art

Tuesday, January 17, 2023 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for five online workshops that spotlight a diverse range of visual art chosen to inspire writers of all experience levels to deepen their process and practice. This writing session is inspired by Antonio Martorell’s La Playa Negra I (Tar Beach I).


Studio Arts Course

Decorative Letters in Watercolor

Tuesday, January 17, 2023 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Get an introduction to stylized lettering, including altered block letters, botanical borders, and illuminated initials with vines and flourishes.


Studio Arts Course

Painting Water… with Watercolor

Tuesday, January 17, 2023 - 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Learn simple and easy techniques to create land and seascape paintings. Special emphasis is given to various watercolor techniques such as wet-on-wet, wet-on-dry, and masking.


Studio Arts Course

Drawing Light… and How the Masters Did It

Tuesday, January 17, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

In this 4-session class, learn the strategies artists such as Rembrandt, Daumier, Cézanne, and Van Gogh used to harness light and unify, intensify, and give dimension to their images. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Studio Arts Course

Basic Weaving on the Rigid Heddle Loom

Tuesday, January 17, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Acquire the basic skills to work with the versatile and portable rigid heddle loom—a great entryway into weaving scarves, placemats, dishtowels, and more.


Lecture/Seminar

Brave Hearted: The Women of the American West

Tuesday, January 17, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

They ranged from mothers and wives to hard-living poker players and prostitutes, brutally displaced Native American women to enslaved African American women in search of freedom. Author Katie Hickman brings to life the story of the women drawn to the West in the greatest mass migration in American history—and who transformed their country in the process.


Course

Introduction to Music Theory

Tuesday, January 17, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

If you’ve always wanted to learn the language and elements of musical notation and composition, this interactive online course led by music educator and conductor Ernest Johnson offers the perfect opportunity. Johnson guides exercises and assignments geared to developing the foundation every musician needs: the aural and visual understanding of pitch, rhythm, harmony, and form.


Studio Arts Course

Introduction to Photography

Wednesday, January 18, 2023 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Whether you want to work in digital or film, this course offers a solid foundation for new photographers ready to learn the basics. Topics include camera functions, exposure, metering, working with natural and artificial light, and composition.


Studio Arts Course

Handwork Basics for Today’s Quilter

Wednesday, January 18, 2023 - 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

Master basic hand-stitching techniques to create your own quilt designs. Learn to make templates for a pieced design, piece 3- and 4-way intersections and curves, assemble a quilt top with borders and sashing, finish edges, and more.


Studio Arts Course

Collage and Mixed-Media

Wednesday, January 18, 2023 - 1:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Students are introduced to the materials, tools, and technologies used in collage and assemblage. They find inspiration in artists who worked in collage including Joseph Cornell, Romare Bearden, and Gertrude Green.


Studio Arts Course

Collage and Mixed-Media: Animals and Nature

Wednesday, January 18, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Learn to sketch animals and objects found in nature, then combine your drawings with painting and additional elements and textures to create whimsical or serious mixed media art.


Studio Arts Course

Introduction to Photography II

Wednesday, January 18, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Whether you work digitally or on film, this course is ideal for students who are familiar with their cameras but are interested in expanding their understanding of photography fundamentals.


Studio Arts Course

Drawing Light… and How the Masters Did It – In Color

Wednesday, January 18, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Using watercolor, learn the strategies Delacroix, Turner, Monet, and Cézanne employed to harness light in their images. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Studio Arts Course

Focus and Depth of Field

Wednesday, January 18, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Sharpen your knowledge of focus and depth of field through in-class discussion and homework assignments. Gain a better understanding of focus modes, area modes, and hyperfocal distance/focusing. DSLR, mirrorless, and film cameras are welcome.


Studio Arts Course

Poetic Watercolor Skies

Wednesday, January 18, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Discover how to capture the sky’s ever-changing moods in watercolor. Learn techniques for rendering the sky, whether filled with wispy cirrus clouds or dramatic cumulus clouds.


Lecture/Seminar

How To Nourish Your Mental Health

Wednesday, January 18, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Food has power to nourish your mind, supporting emotional wellness through both nutrients and pleasure. Drawing from her new book, Eat and Flourish: How Food Supports Emotional Well Being, journalist Mary Beth Albright looks at cutting-edge research to explain the connection between food and mood, interprets studies from the new field of nutritional psychology, and offers straightforward suggestions for what to eat and how to eat it.  


Studio Arts Course

Portrait Drawing

Wednesday, January 18, 2023 - 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

In this class, students will be introduced to the basic steps of how to create a convincing portrait using charcoal or graphite. All levels of experience welcomed.


Lecture/Seminar

A Garden Odyssey: In Search of the World’s Most Creative Gardens

Wednesday, January 18, 2023 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Imagine traveling the world passionately searching for the most exquisite and creatively designed gardens. Baltimore landscape architect Scott C. Scarfone was given just such an opportunity. Follow his garden globetrotting as he recounts memorable visits to fabulous garden sites across the globe.


Studio Arts Course

Elements and Principles of Art

Thursday, January 19, 2023 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The principles and elements of art enable visual artists to convey their intent more successfully. Explore principles such as balance, rhythm, pattern, and elements such as shape, form, and color.


Studio Arts Course

Principles of Abstraction

Thursday, January 19, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Discover the basic elements of abstraction, a very important element of the visual arts, and create your own exciting and innovative works.


Studio Arts Workshop

Photo 101: Natural-Light Photography

Thursday, January 19, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Light can make or break your photos. Understand the essentials of shooting in a natural-light setting as you learn to gauge the direction of light; recognize degree of diffusion; minimize (or emphasize) lens flare; control conditions with lens hoods; and more.


Lecture/Seminar

Adam Smith's America

Thursday, January 19, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Originally published in 1776, Adam Smith’s The Wealth of Nations was lauded by America’s founders as a landmark work of Enlightenment thinking about national wealth, statecraft, and moral virtue. Harvard University lecturer and author Glory Liu traces how generations of Americans have read, reinterpreted, and weaponized Smith’s ideas over time.


Lecture/Seminar

The Wife of Bath

Friday, January 20, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Ever since her triumphant debut in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, the Wife of Bath, arguably the first recognizably real woman in English literature, has obsessed readers. Learn the fascinating origin story of Chaucer’s favorite character and how she has been represented since the 14th century, both in literature, from Falstaff and Molly Bloom, to real social movements, such as #MeToo and Black Lives Matter.


Lecture/Seminar

The Three Greatest Paintings in Florence

Friday, January 20, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Florence nurtured an unceasing succession of great artists for centuries, but among its hundreds and hundreds of Renaissance masterpieces, which are considered the most significant? Renaissance art historian Elaine Ruffolo offers an in-depth look at three paintings and why she considers them the most important in the city. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

Cold-Weather Wines from Hot Climates

Friday, January 20, 2023 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Sommelier Erik Segalbaum provides an in-depth tasting of products from some of the hottest climates in the world guaranteed to warm your soul. This immersive program includes a curated personal tasting kit to enhance the experience.


Lecture/Seminar

Renaissance Rome

Saturday, January 21, 2023 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The return of the papacy in the 15th century transformed Rome from a dilapidated town littered with ruins to a city at the center of the Renaissance movement in Europe. The pope and cardinals spent lavishly as Bramante, Michelangelo, and Raphael were given one commission after another to complete and beautify the city of God. Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in early-Renaissance art, examines this pivotal time in art history as it swept across Rome. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)


Studio Arts Course

Introduction to iPhone Photography

Saturday, January 21, 2023 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

Learn how to use a well-designed secondary camera app to assist iPhone cameras in creating and capturing more sophisticated images.


Studio Arts Course

Introduction to Beading

Saturday, January 21, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

In this class, learn to create your own hand-crafted jewelry. This experience is perfect for the student new to jewelry making, or those with experience who want to refresh their skills.


Studio Arts Course

Calligraphy: Introduction to the Italic Hand

Saturday, January 21, 2023 - 1:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Learn how to use the elegant Italic script for basic projects using various colors and papers. The class is appropriate for beginners or intermediate students with some familiarity with the broad-edge pen who are ready to develop their calligraphy skills.


Studio Arts Course

Understanding Your Digital Mirrorless or SLR Camera

Sunday, January 22, 2023 - 9:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Get the most out of your digital mirrorless or SLR camera by taking part in this workshop, which provides a solid introduction to these cameras’ features and potential.


Studio Arts Course

Introduction to Watercolor

Sunday, January 22, 2023 - 10:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. ET

Beginning students as well as experienced painters explore watercolor techniques and learn new approaches to painting through demonstration, discussion, and experimentation.


Studio Arts Course

Introduction to Afghan Manuscript Illumination

Sunday, January 22, 2023 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The beautiful decorations of religious and secular manuscripts are centuries-old Islamic traditions. Guided by a graduate of the Turquoise Mountain Institute, explore the elements of gold-leaf manuscript illumination in the Afghan tradition.


Studio Arts Course

Artful Mind, Tranquil Mind

Monday, January 23, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

In an artist-led series designed to provide a tranquil mid-day break, create small but satisfying works of art as a way to hit “pause” and incorporate a bit of creativity into your at-home routines.


Course

Jamestown: The First 100 Years

Monday, January 23, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

While the early days of Jamestown were marred with struggle, conflict, and tragedy, the settlement would survive as the first permanent English colony in North America, from which the seeds of the United States grew. Unearth the tumultuous first century of Jamestown with Mark Summers, the public historian for the Jamestown Rediscovery archaeological project, in this lecture series. This session focuses on the beginnings of Jamestown between 1607 to 1618.


Course

Cinema and the Cities: Capturing the Urban Metropolis on Film

Monday, January 23, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

In the right hands, a city becomes an actual character in a film, its locations carefully selected and photographed not only for visual effectiveness but to enhance the narrative’s emotional impact. In an entertaining series, film historian Max Alvarez focuses on movie scenes that illustrate how the same celebrated city—New York, Paris, Los Angeles, or Rome—has been portrayed in various ways depending on the filmmaker’s point of view.


Lecture/Seminar

The Yalta Conference: The Road to the End of World War II

Monday, January 23, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

The February 1945 conference at Yalta marked the second meeting of the “Big Three”—the heads of state of the United Kingdom, Soviet Union, and United States. Historian Christopher Hamner examines the strategic context of the conference, the tensions among the world leaders, and the implications of their discussions on both the coming end of the war and a postwar settlement.


Studio Arts Course

Beginning Drawing

Monday, January 23, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

This introductory course teaches the basic skills needed for drawing. Working with a variety of materials and techniques, including charcoal and pencils, students explore the rendering of geometric forms, volume, and perspective, with an emphasis on personal gesture marks.


Studio Arts Course

Search and Rescue: Back from the (Creative) Edge

Monday, January 23, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Breathe new life into your unfinished or "failed" collages or paintings. Find ways to infuse interest and create a variety of compositions to change the look and feel of your pieces.


Studio Arts Course

The Joy of Photography

Monday, January 23, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Designed for beginners who want to learn how to use their digital or mirrorless camera as a creative tool, students will gain skill in technical aspects of photography so that they can concentrate on composing beautiful images.


Studio Arts Course

Creative Mind Mapping

Monday, January 23, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Take your ideas from banal to beautiful by learning how to create mind maps worthy of framing. Choose from three different styles to illustrate your thoughts and goals.


Course

Write Into Art: Creative Writing Inspired by Visual Art

Tuesday, January 24, 2023 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for five online workshops that spotlight a diverse range of visual art chosen to inspire writers of all experience levels to deepen their process and practice. This writing session is inspired by a self-portrait of 19th-century French artist Suzanne Valadon.


Studio Arts Course

Color Stories Journal

Tuesday, January 24, 2023 - 5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. ET

Explore your relationship to individual colors and how they connect to many facets of your life. Practice simple and playful acrylic painting techniques incorporating all the colors of the spectrum, plus black and white. Then, begin to record personal stories in a journal to use every day.


Lecture/Seminar

Cocktails, Lipstick, and Jazz: Fashion and the 1920s New Woman

Tuesday, January 24, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Beaded fringe bounced to the syncopated sounds of jazz, while illegal gin sloshed in long-stemmed glasses. The New Woman of the ’20s was smart, bold, and sophisticated. Design historian and curator Elizabeth Lay shares the stories and images of this singular era in our history when the new was everything, particularly for women.


Lecture/Seminar

How To Write a Fairy Tale

Tuesday, January 24, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Everyone thinks they know what a fairy tale is. There are castles, a prince or two, maybe a curse to break. But writing a fairy tale is not as easy as you might imagine. Join folklorists and writers Sara Cleto and Brittany Warman as they explore how to go about writing a fairy tale of your own!


Lecture/Seminar

Richard the Lionheart and Saladin: A Rivalry of the Third Crusade

Wednesday, January 25, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

The rivalry between the English king Richard the Lionheart and the Muslim ruler Saladin at the time of the Third Crusade captured the imagination of contemporaries and continues to fascinate us today—yet these two larger-than-life figures never actually met. Historian Jennifer Paxton tells the story of the epic clash between the Kurdish leader who had united much of the Muslim Middle East to drive the crusaders out of the Holy Land and the glamorous European king who was determined to recapture Jerusalem for Christendom.


Lecture/Seminar

Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment: Clues to Reading Russian Novels

Wednesday, January 25, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

We all know that reading Russian novels seems like a formidable undertaking. Join humanities scholar Clay Jenkinson as he provides both a reading and an interpretation of Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment and offers clues to a successful appreciation of how Russian novels work. Bring your buried secrets and guilty conscience.


Studio Arts Course

Color Theory and Practice

Thursday, January 26, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Explore the basics of color theory including temperature, value, and harmony-creating color schemes. In three hands-on projects, learn to use a color wheel with tinting and toning, color charts, and color harmony studies.


Studio Arts Course

Mastering Exposure

Thursday, January 26, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Take your skills beyond auto mode as you explore a myriad of your digital camera’s exposure options and features in this course designed for intermediate photographers.


Lecture/Seminar

A Journey into the Brain

Thursday, January 26, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Although we know a great deal about the brain, there is still so much more to learn. Join neuroscientist Eric Chudler as he leads an interactive guided tour of our most important organ, offering insights into our current knowledge of the brain and suggesting the directions future research may take.


Lecture/Seminar

Inside Shakespeare: Celebrating 400 Years of the Bard’s First Folio

Saturday, January 28, 2023 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Shakespeare’s plays have been part of our lives seemingly forever—quoted in the taverns of 16th-century London, sparking the theatre riots of 19th-century New York City, performed in the American Wild West, and filling stages and screens across the globe today. Tudor and Shakespeare scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger closely examines the playwright and his plays and how he created worlds out of words that inform and shape our language and our culture.


Studio Arts Course

Crepe Paper Flowers: Cosmos, Peony, and Iris

Saturday, January 28, 2023 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Learn to fashion three different flowers in this 3-session workshop. Following basic instructions, construct petals, leaves, and stamens for each bloom.


Studio Arts Workshop

Visual Journaling: Creativity Workout

Saturday, January 28, 2023 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

In a morning of artistic experimentation designed to deepen skills in visual expression, explore five modes of visual thinking including working from memory, observation, imagination, narrative, and experimental approaches.


Course

Jamestown: The First 100 Years

Monday, January 30, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

While the early days of Jamestown were marred with struggle, conflict, and tragedy, the settlement would survive as the first permanent English colony in North America, from which the seeds of the United States grew. Unearth the tumultuous first century of Jamestown with Mark Summers, the public historian for the Jamestown Rediscovery archaeological project, in this lecture series. This session focuses on events between 1619 to 1662, including the first documented Africans being brought to Virginia.


Lecture/Seminar

A Panda Story: Celebrating Giant Pandas at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute with David M. Rubenstein

Monday, January 30, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

In-Person and Online Program: The arrival of the iconic giant pandas Ling-Ling and Hsing-Hsing at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo in the spring of 1972 marked the start of a program that has drawn millions of fans from around the world. It has also provided the Smithsonian an unparalleled opportunity for study. Philanthropist David M. Rubenstein, an instrumental longtime supporter of the program, and Brandie Smith, the Zoo’s director, discuss the history of giant panda care at the Smithsonian, what scientists have learned throughout the decades, and what might be next for current residents Xiao Qi Ji, Mei Xiang, and Tian Tian.


Course

Write Into Art: Creative Writing Inspired by Visual Art

Tuesday, January 31, 2023 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for five online workshops that spotlight a diverse range of visual art chosen to inspire writers of all experience levels to deepen their process and practice. This writing session is inspired by Edward Hopper’s People in the Sun.


Lecture/Seminar

Allied Strategy and Operation Overlord: The Great WWII Crusade

Tuesday, January 31, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Kevin Weddle, a professor of military theory and strategy, traces the development and deployment of the Allied military strategy for Europe—and the cross-channel invasion known as Operation Overlord. He examines how bitter disagreements and reluctant compromises between U.S. and British senior military and political leaders put to the test the “special relationship” between the two allies—and how those leaders and their forces came together to fight in the greatest military operation in history.


Lecture/Seminar

Galápagos Islands: Darwin’s Smoking Gun

Tuesday, January 31, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The young Charles Darwin’s observations from his 1835 exploration of the ecologically unique Galápagos Islands were pivotal to his eventual realization that organisms change with time and that they evolve. Biologist John Kricher and photographer Kevin Loughlin discuss the rich array of fauna and flora of the Galápagos that Darwin might have found, as well as the notable, if not quirky, human history on the islands.


Studio Arts Course

Photographic Creativity, Design, and Composition

Wednesday, February 1, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

This intermediate-level photography course offers a better understanding of compositional elements and practices—such as simplicity, balance, and natural lighting—that promote taking better and more unique photographs.


Lecture/Seminar

Discovering Bordeaux

Wednesday, February 1, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

World-class wine, medieval villages, museums, and markets: The Bordeaux region of France is truly a feast for all the senses, with a history that unfolds around every scenic turn. Emmy Award–nominated PBS television host Darley Newman showcases the best that this area of Southwestern France has to offer and shares how to get the most out of your visit to France’s renowned wine region.


Lecture/Seminar

Art Crimes: International Art Heists

Wednesday, February 1, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Big-money art attracts big-money criminals. Expert on art fraud and former FBI agent Robert Wittman provides a closeup view of some of the notorious heists and daring recovery operations he worked on as an agent.


Lecture/Seminar

Rick Steves on Eating in Italy: A Cultured Conversation with Fred Plotkin

Thursday, February 2, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Italy and its superb cuisine draw hungry visitors from all over the world. European travel expert Rick Steves joins Fred Plotkin, a specialist in Italian cuisine and culture, for a deep dive into many of Italy’s secret culinary pleasures. Their shared insights about hidden gems ensure that your next trip to Italy is delizioso.


Studio Arts Course

Take a Break to Knit: Strip Knitting

Friday, February 3, 2023 - 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Explore techniques, proportions, colorways, and stitch patterns to create strip-knitted projects in a relaxed and supportive atmosphere.


Lecture/Seminar

Botanical Gardens World Tour: Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and the Eden Project

Sunday, February 5, 2023 - 4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. ET

Indulge in a colorful midwinter escape as horticultural experts lead a series of virtual visits that highlight the beauty of notable botanical gardens. This program spotlights Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and the Eden Project.


Course

Jamestown: The First 100 Years

Monday, February 6, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

While the early days of Jamestown were marred with struggle, conflict, and tragedy, the settlement would survive as the first permanent English colony in North America, from which the seeds of the United States grew. Unearth the tumultuous first century of Jamestown with Mark Summers, the public historian for the Jamestown Rediscovery archaeological project, in this lecture series. This session focuses on events between 1622 to 1646, including an uprising by the Powhatans.


Studio Arts Course

The Art of Black-and-White Photography

Monday, February 6, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Through lecture, demonstration, and work sharing, harness today’s digital tools to create powerful black-and-white images with the emotive power seen in works by Edward Weston, Paul Strand, and Alfred Hitchcock.


Lecture/Seminar

The Geology of Western National Parks: Carlsbad Caverns and White Sands

Monday, February 6, 2023 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Join geologist Kirt Kempter as he explores the geology of Western National Parks over the course of 2023, with an in-depth look at one location every month. He kicks off the series with a focus on parks in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. This program spotlights Carlsbad Caverns and White Sands, both in New Mexico.


Course

Write Into Art: Creative Writing Inspired by Visual Art

Tuesday, February 7, 2023 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for five online workshops that spotlight a diverse range of visual art chosen to inspire writers of all experience levels to deepen their process and practice. This writing session is inspired by Alma Thomas’ colorful compositions, including Pansies in Washington.


Lecture/Seminar

The Second Middle Passage: America’s Domestic Slave Trade

Tuesday, February 7, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Historian Richard Bell takes you inside the domestic slave trade that flourished in the Upper South, tracking its rise and its impact on the expansion of slavery into new territories and states.


Lecture/Seminar

"The Chinese Question": Gold Rushes and Global Politics of Exclusion

Tuesday, February 7, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Historian and author Mae Ngai narrates the story of the thousands of Chinese who left their homeland in the mid-19th-century in pursuit of gold, and how they formed communities and organizations to help navigate their perilous new world. But they later found themselves excluded from immigration and citizenship.


Lecture/Seminar

Spices 101: Ginger

Wednesday, February 8, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Join Eleanor Ford, acclaimed food writer and author of The Nutmeg Trail: Recipes and Stories Along the Ancient Spice Routes as she explores ginger’s history, lore, science, and flavor, then turns to the kitchen where she shares how home cooks can use it to best effect.


Lecture/Seminar

Stonehenge: An Epic Enigma

Wednesday, February 8, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Modern scientists are slowly unlocking Stonehenge’s secrets, but the stone circle remains a uniquely iconic enigma. Kelly Beatty, senior editor at Sky and Telescope magazine, discusses these new developments and the enduring mystery of Stonehenge.


Studio Arts Course

The Art of Floral Design

Wednesday, February 8, 2023 - 7:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Explore the spectrum of floral design. Sourcing (with a focus on sustainability), making the most of seasonal flowers, creating centerpieces, wiring techniques, and photographing your work are all among the practical areas covered. 


Lecture/Seminar

Marisol: A Pop Art Superstar

Thursday, February 9, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Glamorous, sophisticated, worldly, and wickedly funny, Marisol Escobar, better known simply as “Marisol,” was the most famous and successful female Pop artist. Art historian Nancy G. Heller examines Marisol’s major works and career, with particular attention to the difficulties of a female Latinx artist in a world dominated by white men. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Studio Arts Workshop

Color Theory and Chroma-psychology Workshop

Thursday, February 9, 2023 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Learn how to make color choices in your art to bring out a reaction from the viewer. Create combinations with colored pencils that illustrate how color theory works.


Lecture/Seminar

Astrology in Renaissance Art: Representation and Meaning

Thursday, February 9, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The intersection of art and astrology played a key role during the Renaissance, particularly for patrons like the Medici family, who used astrological imagery to promote themselves and their increasing de-facto power in Florence. Art critic Claudia Rousseau examines the development of astrological practices during the period, their cultural importance, and the artworks they influenced. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

War and Pieces: The Met Cloisters and the Lens of History

Friday, February 10, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

When the Cloisters—the branch of the Metropolitan Museum devoted to the art of the medieval world—opened in 1938, not a word was spoken about the threat of war looming over Europe. Yet ironically, the Cloisters’ very foundations stand in witness to the devastating impact of centuries of war and revolution on artistic heritage. Barbara Drake Boehm, curator emerita of the Met Cloisters, examines the museum’s finest works of art against the backdrop of history. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

The Regency World of Jane Austen: Art, Architecture, Culture

Saturday, February 11, 2023 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Emma Woodhouse, Elizabeth Bennet, Anne Elliot, and the Dashwood sisters may be fictional heroines, but their creator Jane Austen set their adventures in romance against the very real social and historical backdrop of Regency England. Art historian Bonita Billman brings the era to life as she surveys Regency manners and fashions, the personalities who dominated the public imagination, and the stylish spa town of Bath, where many of Austen’s characters made appearances. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

Botanical Gardens World Tour: Singapore Botanic Garden and Norfolk Botanical Gardens

Sunday, February 12, 2023 - 4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. ET

Indulge in a colorful midwinter escape as horticultural experts lead a series of virtual visits that highlight the beauty of notable botanical gardens. This program spotlights the Singapore Botanic Garden and Norfolk Botanical Gardens.


Course

Lunchtime with a Curator: Decorative Arts Design Series

Monday, February 13, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay as she hosts an image-rich series on decorative arts and design topics with guests. In this winter lunchtime program, Lay's guest is Rosemary Harden, senior curator and Fashion Museum Bath manager, who surveys the past, present, and future of this museum.


Course

Jamestown: The First 100 Years

Monday, February 13, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

While the early days of Jamestown were marred with struggle, conflict, and tragedy, the settlement would survive as the first permanent English colony in North America, from which the seeds of the United States grew. Unearth the tumultuous first century of Jamestown with Mark Summers, the public historian for the Jamestown Rediscovery archaeological project, in this lecture series. This session focuses on events between 1675 to 1699, including Bacon's Rebellion.


Lecture/Seminar

Ancient Art Collections of Rome

Monday, February 13, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Many of Rome’s lesser-known museums contain some of the world’s most significant Greco-Roman art. Rocky Ruggiero, an expert in Renaissance art, explores the ancient art collections of the Capitoline Museums, the Ara Pacis Museum, the Villa Giulia, and the Palazzo Massimo. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Course

Evocative Concert Music from Europe’s Northern Countries

Tuesday, February 14, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET

Geography, geology, wind and weather, legend and language: all play a role in shaping the artistic vocabulary of national identity, and none more so than the countries situated around the wild oceans of the Baltic, North, and Norwegian seas. Popular speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin draws on unique live piano demonstrations and fascinating film clips to explore both well- and lesser-known masterpieces by composers from this region.


Lecture/Seminar

Gothic Kingdoms: The Fall of Rome and the Birth of Europe

Wednesday, February 15, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

After the sacking of imperial Rome by the army of Alaric the Goth in 410, three centuries of Gothic kings ruled over southern France, Italy, and Spain. The unity imposed by the Roman empire gave way to the divided kingdoms and peoples that shaped medieval Europe. British historian David Gwynn explores the dramatic histories of those kingdoms.


Course

UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Wednesday, February 15, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The 1,154 UNESCO World Heritage sites throughout the world provide fascinating glimpses into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. In a lavishly illustrated series, historian Justin M. Jacobs offers an in-depth overview of Samarra and the Abbasid Caliphate.


Studio Arts Course

Colored Pencils

Thursday, February 16, 2023 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Colored pencil, an often-over-looked dry medium, is coming into its own. Whether used in fine art or illustration, they can enliven work with rich, vibrant color and a dizzying range of effects. Learn basic to intermediate methods and strategies with colored pencils.


Studio Arts Course

Rustic European Doorways in Watercolor

Thursday, February 16, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Old, weathered doorways lining many of Europe’s passageways are perfect subjects for a watercolor painting. In this class, students learn to capture brick-, stone-, and stucco-covered old walls, textured wooden doors, window dressings, and glass panes.


Lecture/Seminar

Discovering Türkiye

Thursday, February 16, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

PBS television host Darley Newman shares great places to discover in Türkiye (the now-official name for Turkey) and how to get the most out of your travels, whether you’re visiting bustling bazaars in Istanbul or venturing off the beaten path. Discover the most intriguing places to experience food, culture, adventure, and history in Istanbul, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Antalya, and the Aegean Coast.


Lecture/Seminar

Road Trip: Wines of the Iberian Coast

Friday, February 17, 2023 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Whether the Atlantic coast of Portugal or the Mediterranean coast of Spain, Iberian vineyards near the water are benchmarks for extraordinary quality. Trade the winter blues for emerald waves as sommelier Erik Segalbaum guides an immersion into some of the most exciting wines of western Europe. This immersive program includes a curated personal tasting kit to enhance the experience.


Studio Arts Course

Introduction to Lightroom

Saturday, February 18, 2023 - 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Adobe Lightroom is the most useful (and user friendly) software for organizing and editing images, usable for both RAW and JPEG image files. This two-session workshop offers users an overview of the program, with a focus on working with the essential Library and Develop modules for organizing and editing your files.


Studio Arts Course

Introduction to iPhone Photography

Saturday, February 18, 2023 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

Learn how to use a well-designed secondary camera app to assist iPhone cameras in creating and capturing more sophisticated images.


Studio Arts Workshop

Orchids for Beginners

Saturday, February 18, 2023 - 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Learn from an orchid-care expert how orchids grow in their native environments and beginner care instructions to keep your orchids blooming.


Lecture/Seminar

Botanical Gardens World Tour: Temple Gardens of Kyoto, Japan

Sunday, February 19, 2023 - 4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. ET

Indulge in a colorful midwinter escape as horticultural experts lead a series of virtual visits that highlight the beauty of notable botanical gardens. This program spotlights the Temple Gardens of Kyoto, Japan.


Studio Arts Course

Sumi-e Watercolor for Beginners

Tuesday, February 21, 2023 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Working with watercolor, employ beautiful and minimal brush strokes to depict the wonders of the natural world in the style of Sumi-e, meant to convey the Ch’i or vital energy of what it depicts.


Lecture/Seminar

The Grapes of Wrath

Tuesday, February 21, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Novelist John Steinbeck's great work of American fiction, The Grapes of Wrath (1939), depicts the treatment of migrant farm workers in California's Central Valley during the Dust Bowl and Great Depression. Humanities scholar Clay Jenkinson leads a spirited discussion of The Grapes of Wrath and why its deeply felt themes resonate today.


Studio Arts Course

Mosaics for Beginners

Tuesday, February 21, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Weekly lectures, demonstrations, and work-along periods provide a solid creative and technical foundation to working with mosaics. Select from 8 unique patterns designed by the instructor with the option to work either in glass tiles or unglazed porcelain.


Studio Arts Course

Introduction to Scientific Illustration - Watercolor and Ink

Tuesday, February 21, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Learn to see like a scientist as you use watercolor and ink to illustrate specimens from nature. Experienced students develop their skills in applying key techniques such as composition, working with color, and recording fine detail in nature journaling, watercolor painting, drawing, and creating stand-alone biological illustrations.


Course

UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Wednesday, February 22, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The 1,154 UNESCO World Heritage sites throughout the world provide fascinating glimpses into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. In a lavishly illustrated series, historian Justin M. Jacobs offers an in-depth overview of Angor Wat.


Lecture/Seminar

An Anatomy of Addiction

Wednesday, February 22, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Medical historian Howard Markel traces the careers of two brilliant young doctors—Sigmund Freud, neurologist, and William Halsted, surgeon—showing how their powerful addictions to cocaine shaped their enormous contributions to psychology and medicine. He also examines the physical and emotional damage caused by the then-heralded wonder drug, and how each man ultimately changed the world in spite of it.


Lecture/Seminar

Wildfire: The Life and Works of Edmonia Lewis

Thursday, February 23, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Nineteenth-century artist Edmonia Lewis, the daughter of a Black man and a Native American woman, overcame poverty and racial and gender-based discrimination to become an enormously successful professional sculptor based in Rome. Art historian Nancy G. Heller discusses Lewis’s place within the broader context of American Neoclassicism and African American art history. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

Gene Kelly: Singing and Dancing in the Rain

Thursday, February 23, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Gene Kelly, one of the most engaging and influential dancers to ever set foot in Hollywood, emerged as a star at a time when most movie dancing was basically a showcase for elegant partners in motion. In a program illustrated with video clips, Brian Rose, professor emeritus at Fordham University, surveys Kelly’s remarkable achievements and examines his enduring impact on Hollywood dancing.


Studio Arts Workshop

The Art of Paste Painting

Thursday, February 23, 2023 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Paste painting, a surface design technique, uses mark-making tools to manipulate pigmented paste to create beautiful decorative papers. These sheets can be used in books, collage, cards, and more.


Lecture/Seminar

I Do Solemnly Swear: A History of Supreme Court Nominations

Thursday, February 23, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Join historian Christopher Brooks as he surveys the history of the Supreme Court, its nominations process, and the politics that have played a role in shaping the Court into what we see today.


Lecture/Seminar

Frederick Douglass: Autobiographer

Thursday, February 23, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

During the 19th century, the great civil rights leader Frederick Douglass (1818–1895) was a celebrated orator, editor, and writer. Join Douglass scholar Robert S. Levine as he focuses on Douglass the autobiographer and considers the significant changes and additions he made to his later autobiographies, My Bondage and My Freedom and Life and Times of Frederick Douglass.


Studio Arts Course

Creative Instagram Content for Artists and Entrepreneurs

Friday, February 24, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Optimize your Instagram profile and create fun and engaging posts using the Canva platform and Lifelapse (stop motion) apps.


Lecture/Seminar

Scotland and England: An Imperfect Union?

Saturday, February 25, 2023 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Though Scotland is the only part of the island of Britain never to have been conquered by England, the country has always had to reckon with its powerful southern neighbor. Historian Jennifer Paxton explores the remarkable story of the struggle to define Scottish identity over the past thousand years, as the country went from proudly independent kingdom to junior partner within Great Britain.


Studio Arts Workshop

Accordion Book Structures

Saturday, February 25, 2023 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

Create two finished accordion books that can be used as blank canvasses for drawings, mixed media work, collage, or as a model for a more complex, printed-book edition.


Studio Arts Course

The Language of Textiles

Monday, February 27, 2023 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

From high fashion to traditional folk art, textiles have a language of their own that tells the story of who created them. Learn how to express your own designer’s voice through techniques including pleating, hand and machine stitching, and applique to create unique forms and embellishments for your textiles.


Studio Arts Course

Composition

Monday, February 27, 2023 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

This course examines fundamental concepts of composition and their practical application in studio-art practice, offering participants tools to enrich their own work as well to analyze and appreciate visual art in general. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Course

Lunchtime with a Curator: Decorative Arts Design Series

Monday, February 27, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay as she hosts an image-rich series on decorative arts and design topics with guests. In this winter lunchtime program, Lay's guest is textile historian Natalie F. Larson, who uses primary sources to look at the variety of sleeping arrangements from slave dwellings and Indigenous populations to the homes of middle-class and upwardly aspiring Virginians.


Lecture/Seminar

Back from the Brink: Lessons from Wildlife Species Defying Extinction

Monday, February 27, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Against the bleak backdrop of wildlife species moving toward extinction, there are also glimmers of hope and lessons to be learned from animals that have defied these global trends. Christopher J. Preston, author of Tenacious Beasts: Wildlife Recoveries That Change How We Think About Animals, reveals the mysteries and challenges at the heart of these resurgences.


Course

Understanding Contemporary Art: From Pop to Pluralism

Tuesday, February 28, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

The work of American artists today explores an enormous range of materials, techniques, and styles—a  pluralistic experimentation that encompasses forms from conceptual and super-realist art to environmental and performance art. Art historian Nancy G. Heller surveys the roots and later influences of radical American art from the last five decades. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)


Course

Exploring Ancient Anatolia: A Turkish Odyssey

Wednesday, March 1, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Anatolia’s colorful history has left a windfall of riches—ancient ruins, ornate Byzantine churches, supremely elegant mosques, and splendid Ottoman palaces. In an illustrated series, Serif Yenen, a Turkish-born tour guide and author, highlights the heritage and splendor of ancient Turkey through an examination of some of its cultural gems.


Studio Arts Course

Introduction to Bobbin Lace

Wednesday, March 1, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Learn the basics of weaving handmade bobbin lace, from winding the bobbins to making four small lace projects.


Course

UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Wednesday, March 1, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The 1,154 UNESCO World Heritage sites throughout the world provide fascinating glimpses into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. In a lavishly illustrated series, historian Justin M. Jacobs offers an in-depth overview of Philippine Rice Terraces of Ifugao.


Studio Arts Workshop

When Good Patterns Go Bad: Avoiding and Fixing Knitting Mistakes

Sunday, March 5, 2023 - 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Tangled up in a knitting problem? From dropped stitches to difficult pattern instructions to twisted stitches and more, learn a protocol to follow when you’re stuck on a project.


Lecture/Seminar

The Geology of Western National Parks: Grand Canyon, Arizona

Monday, March 6, 2023 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Join geologist Kirt Kempter as he explores the geology of Western National Parks over the course of 2023, with an in-depth look at one location every month. He kicks off the series with a focus on parks in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. This program spotlights the Grand Canyon in Arizona.


Course

What Does It Mean To Live a Good Life?

Tuesday, March 7, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Explore how some of the greatest philosophers have approached one of the central questions of the Western tradition—how to define and lead a good life—and how the question lives on today. Philosophy professor Michael Gorman examines the precepts of Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Aquinas, as well as the viewpoints of more modern thinkers in an insightful 4-session series.


Lecture/Seminar

The Oscars

Tuesday, March 7, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Washington City Paper film critic Noah Gittell is back for an evening that focuses on all things Oscar, from Academy Awards history and trivia to discussions of this year’s nominations and behind-the-scenes stories. He sorts through all of the story lines, rumors, and gossip, so that when the telecast begins, you'll be the most knowledgeable guest at your Oscar party.


Course

UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Wednesday, March 8, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The 1,154 UNESCO World Heritage sites throughout the world provide fascinating glimpses into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. In a lavishly illustrated series, historian Justin M. Jacobs offers an in-depth overview of Sacred Sites of Tibet.


Lecture/Seminar

American Women and the Fight for Equality

Thursday, March 9, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

After what Susan B. Anthony called “the long, hard fight,” the Nineteenth Amendment enfranchising 26 million white and Black women, was added to the Constitution on August 26, 1920. Join author Elisabeth Griffith as she focuses on a diverse cast of characters, some notable, many unknown, as she highlights how the diversity of the women’s movement mirrors America.


Lecture/Seminar

Ancient Egypt Through its Art and Architecture

Saturday, March 11, 2023 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The secret to understanding the daily life and culture of ancient Egypt under its great rulers and pharaohs is right before our eyes—in its art and architecture. Using evidence from the most recent archaeological discoveries, Egyptian specialist Jacquelyn Williamson surveys the social and historical realities of this civilization from its early pyramids through its art created under King Akhenaten, who upended centuries of tradition to create new artistic conventions. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)


Course

Lunchtime with a Curator: Decorative Arts Design Series

Monday, March 13, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay as she hosts an image-rich series on decorative arts and design topics with guests. In this winter lunchtime program, Lay's guest is textile conservationist Julia M. Brennan, who has built cultural bridges to preserve textile heritage.


Lecture/Seminar

Feminist Fairy Tales: Who Needs a Prince?

Monday, March 13, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

You might have heard something like this: Fairy tales are so sexist. All these girls needing a prince to save them!" But the politics of gender in fairy tales are much more complicated. Folklorists Sara Cleto and Brittany Warman explore the roots of fairy-tale studies and illustrate how scholarly discussions of sex and gender have transformed the art of the fairy tale as we know it.


Lecture/Seminar

The Tale of Shuten Doji

Tuesday, March 14, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The 14th-century Japanese legend The Tale of Shuten Doji was a popular subject in visual and performing arts during the Edo period. Art historian Yui Suzuki examines the illustrated tale in depth, focusing on both the conventional and cryptic meanings that the artworks convey. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Course

UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Wednesday, March 15, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The 1,154 UNESCO World Heritage sites throughout the world provide fascinating glimpses into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. In a lavishly illustrated series, historian Justin M. Jacobs offers an in-depth overview of Brasilia, the Utopian Capital of Brazil.


Lecture/Seminar

How the Internet Changed the Media

Thursday, March 16, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Brian Rose, professor emeritus at Fordham University, examines the many ways the internet has radically transformed the “old” media of newspapers, magazines, the recording industry, film, radio, and television. He traces how this digital revolution took place in such a short period of time, and what lies ahead in the continually changing era of “new” media.


Lecture/Seminar

The Heart of John Brown

Thursday, March 16, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

John Brown’s attack on the federal armory in Harpers Ferry—the first salvo in his battleplan to destroy American slavery—went wrong almost immediately and would eventually cost him his life. Historian Richard Bell examines how Brown’s execution made him a martyr and paved the way for Lincoln’s unprecedented election, the secessions crisis, and the coming of the Civil War.


Lecture/Seminar

Island Time: Exploring Wines from the World's Best Island Regions

Friday, March 17, 2023 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

No wine is an island, but many world-class wines are from islands. Sommelier Erik Segalbaum examines various island winemaking regions and how a proximity to oceans and seas leads to consistent flavor elements in the finished products. This immersive program includes a curated personal tasting kit to enhance the experience.


Lecture/Seminar

Tudor London: A Dynasty’s Imprint on History

Saturday, March 18, 2023 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The rule of three generations of Tudor monarchs became inextricably linked with the growth and identity of London as a powerful urban center. Historian Cheryl White examines how the dynasty created an indelible Tudor imprint on history—and the city—across the reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary I, and Elizabeth I.


Lecture/Seminar

Thomas Gainsborough: Beyond the Blue Boy

Thursday, March 23, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Thomas Gainsborough, one of the most important British artists of the second half of the 18th century, was also one of England’s earliest homegrown geniuses. Art historian Bonita Billman examines Gainsborough’s lush painterly technique, iconic masterworks (especially those in America), and his influence on painting. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)