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Authors, Books, & Writing Programs
Literature of the South: Defining a Genre

What do novelists like William Faulkner and Eudora Welty have in common that defines them by the honorific “Southern writer”? Lisbeth Strimple Fuisz, a lecturer in the English Department at Georgetown University, leads a 4-session course about authors whose works uniquely define what it means to write about the South. This session discusses A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole.

Date
Monday, December 17, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
J.D. Salinger: The Eloquent Recluse

The author of The Catcher in the Rye and other seminal works of midcentury fiction led a life of self-imposed seclusion from the public, preferring to let his writing speak for him. He’s in the spotlight as author Daniel Stashower explores Salinger’s life and legacy and actor Scott Sedar reads a selection of his most celebrated works.

Date
Monday, January 7, 2019 - 6:45 p.m.
Literature of the South: Defining a Genre

What do novelists like William Faulkner and Eudora Welty have in common that defines them by the honorific “Southern writer”? Lisbeth Strimple Fuisz, a lecturer in the English Department at Georgetown University, leads a 4-session course about authors whose works uniquely define what it means to write about the South. This session discusses A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest Gaines.

Date
Monday, January 14, 2019 - 6:45 p.m.
The Stories Behind Harry Potter’s Magic

The extraordinary world that J.K. Rowling created in the first Harry Potter book in 1997 has expanded into a universe that millions of readers and moviegoers have embraced. Curator Cristian Petru Panaite reveals the roots of that world, which reach far deeper in time to cultural traditions of magic and folklore that have captivated imaginations for centuries.

Date
Wednesday, January 16, 2019 - 6:45 p.m.
Inside Shakespeare

Shakespeare created worlds out of words that have informed and shaped our language and culture for more than 400 years. Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd Stanger examines how his histories, tragedies, and comedies so insightfully capture the full spectrum of the human condition.

Date
Saturday, January 26, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
The Medieval Illuminated Manuscript: Praising God with Exquisite Beauty

Art historian Laura McCloskey examines how the monk-artists who produced sumptuous illuminated books such as the The Book of Kells and the Lindisfarne Gospels created sacred texts that were also remarkable and innovative works of art.  (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Date
Wednesday, January 30, 2019 - 6:45 p.m.
The Books That Fought Slavery

The long fight against American slavery produced some of the most powerful autobiographies and works of fiction in American history. Read and discuss four 19th-century classics by men and women, both black and white, who were central figures in the struggle to destroy the institution.

Date
Thursday, January 31, February 28, March 28, and April 25, 2019 – 6:45 p.m.