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Smithsonian Associates - Entertaining, Informative, Eclectic, Insightful

Science & Nature Programs

Live Streaming

Join cave diver Jill Heinerth, as she recounts her journeys to remote water-filled caves from Antarctica and Siberia to Bermuda and the Bahamas. She offers images and videos about tiny venomous cave inhabitants, archaeological remains of the Mayan people, and ancient lofty stalagmites that tell the story of earth before humans.

Date of event
Wednesday, August 12, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET
Live Streaming

Aviation writer and filmmaker Paul Glenshaw tells the story of the epic race between two engineering teams who ran a neck-and-neck race to be the first to fly in the fall and winter of 1903. One was a pair of brothers—Orville and Wilbur Wright. The other team was Dr. Samuel Langley, secretary of the Smithsonian, and his assistant, Charles Matthews Manly. We know who won—but do we know why?

Date of event
Wednesday, August 19, 2020 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET
Live Streaming

The question of how to meet the challenges of climate change continues to take on an increasingly larger role in the worldwide debate about the future of our planet. Olúfémi O. Táíwò, an assistant professor of political philosophy and ethics at Georgetown University, provides an overview of these issues as he examines the range of pathways that are under discussion by communities, countries, and policymakers.

Date of event
Tuesday, September 1, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET
Live Streaming

The fragile beauty and astounding endurance of butterflies have long fascinated us. Science journalist Wendy Williams looks at how scientists, gardeners, naturalists, and citizen scientists joined together to decipher the secrets of butterflies in order to protect them—and to learn what they might tell us about meeting the challenges of climate change.

Date of event
Wednesday, September 2, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET
Live Streaming

Scientists are reevaluating the traditional view of how birds conduct their lives, uncovering a remarkable intelligence that encompasses actions once considered uniquely human. From avian cheating and kidnapping to collaboration and altruism, author Jennifer Ackerman discusses her investigation into the bird way of being.

Date of event
Wednesday, September 9, 2020 - 7:00 p.m. ET
Live Streaming

Since we’re spending more time indoors these days, finding ways to bring the beauty of nature into our homes is more important than ever. Join noted floral designer Sarah von Pollaro in an informative webinar in which she demonstrates how to create beautiful arrangements step by step.

Date of event
Friday, September 11, 2020 - 12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. ET
Live Streaming

What should our relationship to the planet look like when we finally emerge from our homes? John Judge, president and CEO of the Appalachian Mountain Club, makes the argument that to preserve the environment, a revolution must take place in which every person becomes an advocate for nature and the outdoors.

Date of event
Wednesday, September 16, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET
Live Streaming

Meeting the shock and awe of extreme floods, droughts, storms, and fires calls for plans and action—and authoritative scientific information. Roger S. Pulwarty, the senior scientist in the physical sciences division at NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory, examines the significance and sources of that information as countries, communities, and businesses make critical decisions in response to changing weather and extreme climate trends.

Date of event
Wednesday, September 23, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET
Live Streaming

Smithsonian magazine was launched in the spring of 1970—as was the first Earth Day—and from the start it has been the trusted go-to source on the natural world and environmental issues. Mark these anniversaries by revisiting some of the magazine’s first articles about how we understand our planet with the journalists, photographers, and other experts who brought these stories to life.

Date of event
Friday, September 25, 2020 - 7:00 p.m. ET
Live Streaming

Christian churches and other world religions are increasingly incorporating environmentalism into their teachings. Ethicist and author William Barbieri explores how and why these religious traditions are responding to ecological challenges, and what we can learn from this process regarding the role of religions in the modern world.

Date of event
Friday, October 2, 2020 - 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET
Live Streaming

For Albert Einstein, Galileo Galilei was “the father of modern physics—indeed, of modern science altogether.” Astrophysicist Mario Livio examines Galileo’s monumental achievements in astronomy, mechanics, and the development of the scientific method.

Date of event
Wednesday, October 7, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET
Live Streaming

How can you tell a downy woodpecker from a hairy one? A Cooper’s hawk from a sharp-shinned hawk? Liana Vitali, naturalist and educator at Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary, shares tips, facts, and resources for dedicated birders and birding beginners alike.

Date of event
Wednesday, October 21, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET
Live Streaming

For centuries, philosophers have attempted to answer the question of whether humans are naturally good or evil without any definitive results. Evolutionary biologist Rui Diogo turns instead to the sciences, anthropology, history, sociology, and other fields to examine at what empirical data says about our basic nature—and offers some surprising insights into this age-old inquiry.

Date of event
Thursday, November 5, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET