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The Greening of Religion: Ethics and the Environment

Live Streaming

Christian churches and other world religions are increasingly incorporating environmentalism into their teachings. Ethicist and author William Barbieri explores how and why these religious traditions are responding to ecological challenges, and what we can learn from this process regarding the role of religions in the modern world.

Date of event
Tuesday, July 7, 2020 - 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET

The Great American Road Trip

Live Streaming

From classic chronicles of the settlement of the West to tales of the modern cross-country road trip, travel narratives have infused American history and popular culture. Allen Pietrobon of Trinity Washington University sets off on a literary journey that explores the nature and impact of these stories of adventure and self-discovery.

Date of event
Wednesday, July 8, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Exploring World Heritage Sites in Asia

Live Streaming

In this 4-session course, come on a virtual tour of four of the most intriguing UNESCO World Heritage sites in Asia, including both well-known and lesser-known sites with Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of history at American University. This session focuses on the Potala Palace.

Date of event
Thursday, July 9, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Backyard Forest Bathing: Reconnecting with Nature

Live Streaming

Join author Melanie Choukas-Bradley for an intimate virtual forest-bathing walk. Plug your headphones or earbuds into your smartphone, get comfortable in your backyard or a favorite natural area, and immerse yourself in nature through a rejuvenating morning program.

Date of event
Friday, July 10, 2020 - 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. ET

Forensic Anthropologist Kathy Reichs

Live Streaming

Kathy Reichs is known for her crime-fiction novels chronicling the adventures of Temperance (Bones) Brennan, a forensic anthropologist at the fictional Jeffersonian Institute. Join her as she uncovers the challenges of translating real-life drama into the stuff of fiction, discusses her dual careers, and shares stories behind her newest novel, A Conspiracy of Bones.

Date of event
Friday, July 10, 2020 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

African Art Through the Centuries

Live Streaming

From the vibrant paintings found in Stone Age caves to works of contemporary creators, the arts of Africa have been shaped by unique creative insight as well as by specific political, social, religious, and economic forces. Art historian Kevin Tervala explores these vibrant artistic expressions through an examination of the continent’s historical trajectory. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Date of event
Monday, July 13 to Friday, July 17, 2020 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Searching for Life in the Universe

Live Streaming

Since the dawn of humankind, we have wondered if we are alone in the universe. Join professors of physics and astronomy from George Mason University to examine how science has progressed in furthering our understanding of this age-old question.

Date of event
Tuesday, July 14, 2020 - 8:00 p.m. ET

How Advanced Technology Reveals Hidden Histories

Live Streaming

Mummy masks, maps, bibles, manuscripts, journals, and even old walls can have important undiscovered stories to tell. Michael B. Toth discusses how his pioneering work in imaging technology has brought once-lost corners of history to light.

Date of event
Wednesday, July 15, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Auroras: Nature's Light Show

Live Streaming

Humans have watched the Northern Lights in awe for centuries, but only recently have scientists been able to fully understand how and why auroras exist. Kelly Beatty, senior editor of Sky & Telescope magazine, explores the origins of these dancing curtains of light, the fanciful explanations once given for them, and when and where you're most likely to see an auroral display.

Date of event
Thursday, July 16, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Backyard Forest Bathing: Reconnecting with Nature

Live Streaming

Join author Melanie Choukas-Bradley for an intimate virtual forest-bathing walk. Plug your headphones or earbuds into your smartphone, get comfortable in your backyard or a favorite natural area, and immerse yourself in nature through a rejuvenating morning program.

Date of event
Friday, July 17, 2020 - 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. ET

Greek Vase-Painting: Gods and Humans

Live Streaming

The human and mythological activities depicted on the painted surfaces of Greek vases provide a richly detailed visual narrative of life in the ancient civilization. Art historian Renee Gondek explores the uses, stories, and artistry of these vessels. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Date of event
Monday, July 20, 2020 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. ET

"It's Baseball, Ray!": Baseball and America's Culture, Values, and Aspirations

Live Streaming

Though football is called America's Game, no sport has had as strong an influence on our culture and mores than the National Pastime. Author, ethicist, and lifelong fan Jack Marshall examines how—from the game’s beginnings to this season—baseball has both mirrored and shaped Americans’ ideas of their country and themselves.

Date of event
Monday, July 20, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

How Hamilton Remixes History and Show Biz

Live Streaming

Historian Richard Bell examines this musical phenomenon to reveal what its success tells us about the marriage of history and show business. He investigates what the show gets right—and wrong—about Alexander Hamilton, the American Revolution, and the birth of the United States, and why it all matters. 

Date of event
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Art + History: Watson and the Shark by John Singleton Copley

Live Streaming

Great art is timeless. Paul Glenshaw examines the iconic painting Watson and the Shark by John Singleton Copley, exploring its historical context, delving into the era of its artist, the present he inhabited, and what shaped his vision and creations. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Date of event
Wednesday, July 22, 2020 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Coal and Capitalism: Theodore Roosevelt, J.P. Morgan, and the Strike That Changed Labor History

Live Streaming

In early 1902, a potentially devastating strike by anthracite coal miners in Pennsylvania escalated a legal and personal clash between President Theodore Roosevelt and financier J.P. Morgan over the government’s role in regulating big business. Author Susan Berfield recounts the story of a banker and a president thrown together in the crucible of national emergency, and discusses why the lessons of Roosevelt and Morgan’s time have taken on a renewed urgency today.

Date of event
Wednesday, July 22, 2020 - 6:45 p.m ET

Exploring World Heritage Sites in Asia

Live Streaming

In this 4-session course, come on a virtual tour of four of the most intriguing UNESCO World Heritage sites in Asia, including both well-known and lesser-known sites with Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of history at American University. This session focuses on Samarkand.

Date of event
Thursday, July 23, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Backyard Forest Bathing: Reconnecting with Nature

Live Streaming

Join author Melanie Choukas-Bradley for an intimate virtual forest-bathing walk. Plug your headphones or earbuds into your smartphone, get comfortable in your backyard or a favorite natural area, and immerse yourself in nature through a rejuvenating morning program.

Date of event
Friday, July 24, 2020 - 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. ET

Wine Regions of France and Italy: Bordeaux

Live Streaming

Join Food and Wine magazine’s 2019 Sommelier of the Year Erik Segelbaum in an enjoyable interactive workshop series designed to boost the wine IQ of both novices and seasoned aficionados. He dives into the worlds of French and Italian wine, covering four regions whose output is world-renowned—and you follow along with an at-home tasting kit. This workshop focuses on the Bordeaux wine region.

Date of event
Friday, July 24, 2020 - 6:00 p.m. ET

Dropping the Atomic Bomb: The Debate Continues

Live Streaming

Seventy-five years after U.S. war planes dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the actions that helped bring WWII to a close remain highly contentious. Peter Kuznick, director of the Nuclear Studies Institute at American University, examines the decisions behind these history-changing acts, their legacy, and why we’re still divided about the military and moral justifications that were used to usher in the nuclear age of warfare.

Date of event
Monday, July 27, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Author Erik Larson on Churchill's Darkest Year

Live Streaming

Drawing on his new book The Splendid and the Vile, Erik Larson offers a vivid portrait of London and Winston Churchill during the Blitz, detailing how the prime minister taught the British people “the art of being fearless.”

Date of event
Tuesday, July 28, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Leadership in Crisis: Defining Moments of Modern Presidencies

Live Streaming

Leaders from Franklin Roosevelt to Donald Trump dealt with their defining moments—including international, economic, political, and personal crises—in a variety of ways that forever changed our perceptions of them. As he surveys these responses, journalist Ken Walsh identifies what we have learned about presidential attributes and skills that matter most in trying times, and takes a fresh look at President Trump through the prism of his crisis-filled administration.

Date of event
Wednesday, July 29, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Hacking Darwin: Genetic Engineering and the Future of Humanity

Live Streaming

As our DNA becomes as readable, writable, and hackable as our information technology, the choices made today could be the difference between advances in human well-being or a genetic arms race. Jamie Metzl, a technology and healthcare futurist and geopolitical expert, explores the many ways genetic engineering is shaking the core foundations of our lives: sex, war, love, and death.

Date of event
Thursday, July 30, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Venice: 1000 Years of History

Live Streaming

The golden period of the Serenissima Republic is reflected in the glorious art generated for its churches, confraternities, and palaces, including works by Bellini, Tintoretto, Tiepolo, and other masters. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo traces the history of this fabled city and the art and architecture created there. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Date of event
Friday, July 31, 2020 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

"A Momentous Victory": The Decisive Battle of Midway

Live Streaming

Six months after the devastating attack on Pearl Harbor, the Japanese Imperial Navy suffered a stunning and lopsided defeat at the hands of the American Pacific fleet near Midway atoll. Historian Chris Hamner of George Mason University examines why the encounter was not just the most decisive naval battle of the Pacific War, but one of the most consequential in all of history.

Date of event
Monday, August 3, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Economics + Harry Potter

Live Streaming

The Harry Potter novels may seem like a strange perspective from which to view economics, but a realm filled with magic also includes some financial realities that even the most powerful spell can’t make vanish. Economist Brian O’Roark entertainingly investigates how topics including monetary systems, black markets, utility theory, and more pervade the Potterverse.

Date of event
Tuesday, August 4, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Art + History: The Gross Clinic by Thomas Eakins

Live Streaming

Great art is timeless. Paul Glenshaw examines the iconic painting The Gross Clinic by Thomas Eakins, exploring its historical context, delving into the era of its artist, the present he inhabited, and what shaped his vision and creations. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Date of event
Wednesday, August 5, 2020 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Philosophy and "The Good Place"

Live Streaming

"The Good Place" combined philosophy and humor as it asked what it means to be a morally good human being. The show’s philosophical adviser Todd May discusses the variety of theories and moral dilemmas it addressed as each of its characters found their own way to redemption—philosophically speaking.

Date of event
Wednesday, August 5, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Exploring World Heritage Sites in Asia

Live Streaming

In this 4-session course, come on a virtual tour of four of the most intriguing UNESCO World Heritage sites in Asia, including both well-known and lesser-known sites with Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of history at American University. This session focuses on the Taj Mahal.

Date of event
Thursday, August 6, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

The Sparkling Mosaics of Ravenna

Live Streaming

No medium better embodies the glory and mystery of both Byzantine culture and Early Christian iconography than mosaics. Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in the Early Renaissance, surveys the fascinating history of Ravenna that shaped the city’s most recognizable artistic marvels. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Date of event
Friday, August 7, 2020 - 6:30 p.m. ET

Michelangelo, Pope Julius, and the Sistine Chapel

Live Streaming

When Michelangelo signed the contract with Pope Julius II in 1508 to paint the Sistine Chapel ceiling, little did he know the turmoil that awaited him. Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in the Early Renaissance, examines the artistic importance of the ceiling and the human drama behind its creation, as well as the chapel’s history and its exquisite art produced before Michelangelo. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Date of event
Saturday, August 8, 2020 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Wine Regions of France and Italy: Central and Southern Italy

Live Streaming

Join Food and Wine magazine’s 2019 Sommelier of the Year Erik Segelbaum in an enjoyable interactive workshop series designed to boost the wine IQ of both novices and seasoned aficionados. He dives into the worlds of French and Italian wine, covering four regions whose output is world-renowned—and you follow along with an at-home tasting kit. This workshop focuses on Central and Southern wine regions.

Date of event
Saturday, August 8, 2020 - 4:00 p.m. ET

Will Rogers: Oklahoma's Favorite Son

Live Streaming

Will Rogers’ plainspoken humor and clear-eyed social commentary struck a chord with audiences around the world during the early decades of the 20th century and made him the voice of his nation. Author Daniel Stashower explores this true American original’s life and legacy and actor Scott Sedar performs some of his most celebrated monologues.

Date of event
Monday, August 10, 2020 - 6:30 p.m. ET

The Milky Way and Our Neighbors

Live Streaming

Humankind has long looked to the skies to understand our place in the vast expanse of stars and planets. Astronomer Carrie Fitzgerald surveys the breakthrough observations that revealed many of the secrets of our home galaxy, as well as the Milky Way’s tantalizing puzzles whose keys remain hidden from view.

Date of event
Tuesday, August 11, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Into the Planet: The Science and Exploration of Underwater Caves

Live Streaming

Join cave diver Jill Heinerth, as she recounts her journeys to remote water-filled caves from Antarctica and Siberia to Bermuda and the Bahamas. She offers images and videos about tiny venomous cave inhabitants, archaeological remains of the Mayan people, and ancient lofty stalagmites that tell the story of earth before humans.

Date of event
Wednesday, August 12, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

How We Remember Women's Suffrage

Live Streaming

Although Susan B. Anthony became the iconic figure of women’s suffrage, most of the stories of the women of all classes and races who were part of the movement are missing from its history. Curator Lisa Kathleen Graddy of the American History Museum examines how Anthony became cemented in the public imagination, as well as who was left out of the movement’s story and how their exclusion still haunts the struggle for women’s rights.

Date of event
Thursday, August 13, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Wine Regions of France and Italy: Burgundy

Live Streaming

Join Food and Wine magazine’s 2019 Sommelier of the Year Erik Segelbaum in an enjoyable interactive workshop series designed to boost the wine IQ of both novices and seasoned aficionados. He dives into the worlds of French and Italian wine, covering four regions whose output is world-renowned—and you follow along with an at-home tasting kit. This workshop focuses on the Burgundy wine region.

Date of event
Friday, August 14, 2020 - 6:00 p.m. ET

The Battle for America: The French and Indian War

Live Streaming

Pre-revolutionary America took center stage in the world’s first truly global war in the mid-18th century. Historian Richard Bell examines how this bitter contest among the great empires of Britain, France, and Spain played out on American soil and how it sowed the seeds of the imperial crisis that would culminate in the new nation’s independence.

Date of event
Monday, August 17, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Roving for Signs of Life on Mars

Live Streaming

As part of of Space Tuesdays with George Mason University Observatory, Peter Plavchan and Michael Summers, professors of physics and astronomy at GMU, and John Callas, former manager of NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover program, look at the prospects of life on Mars past and present through scientific evidence collected by robotic landers and rovers and remote-sensing orbiters.

Date of event
Tuesday, August 18, 2020 - 8:00 p.m. ET

Langley and Manly and Orville and Wilbur: The Race To Be First To Fly

Live Streaming

Aviation writer and filmmaker Paul Glenshaw tells the story of the epic race between two engineering teams who ran a neck-and-neck race to be the first to fly in the fall and winter of 1903. One was a pair of brothers—Orville and Wilbur Wright. The other team was Dr. Samuel Langley, secretary of the Smithsonian, and his assistant, Charles Matthews Manly. We know who won—but do we know why?

Date of event
Wednesday, August 19, 2020 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

China's Lost Treasures: Plundered or Bartered?

Live Streaming

From the 1790s until World War I, Western museums filled their shelves with art and antiquities from around the world that are now widely seen as stolen or plundered. Historian Justin M. Jacobs examines an exodus of cultural treasures from northwestern China that reveals a path shaped by factors more complex—and surprising—than coercion, corruption, and deceit.

Date of event
Wednesday, August 19, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Discovering the Wines of South Africa

Live Streaming

South Africa is the eighth largest global wine-producer and its wine industry is among the oldest of the New World. Jim Clarke, marketing manager for Wines of South Africa, discusses how wind, sea, and mountains have shaped South Africa’s vineyards and what these defining elements bring to its wines.

Date of event
Thursday, August 20, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Retelling Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey

Live Streaming

Homer’s epic poems, masterful retellings of the legendary Trojan War and its aftermath, mark the dawn of Western literature. Classical archeologist Frederick Winter delves into the Iliad and Odyssey to examine the Greeks’ experiences of war from the perspective of the latest scholarship and archaeological findings.

Date of event
Tuesday, August 25, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Decoding the Royal Wardrobe: From the Tudors to Today

Live Streaming

There's more to the gowns, crowns, uniforms, and regalia of British royalty than meets the eye. Join Tudor scholar Carol Ann Lloyd Stanger for a glimpse into the palace closet that reveals how monarchs used their wardrobes to project power, influence, politics, and personality.

Date of event
Wednesday, August 26, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Cheese Pairings with Cheesemonster Studio

Live Streaming

Join experts from Cheesemonster Studio for a lively and educational virtual evening that explores the art of combining cheese and your favorite adult beverages. They guide participants through curated pairings of five cheeses with one wine, one beer, and one spirit, examining how their flavors work together to create some of the best duets in all of food and beverage.

Date of event
Thursday, August 27, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Global Climate Justice: What Does It Mean?

Live Streaming

The question of how to meet the challenges of climate change continues to take on an increasingly larger role in the worldwide debate about the future of our planet. Olúfémi O. Táíwò, an assistant professor of political philosophy and ethics at Georgetown University, provides an overview of these issues as he examines the range of pathways that are under discussion by communities, countries, and policymakers.

Date of event
Tuesday, September 1, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Art + History: Guernica by Pablo Picasso

Live Streaming

Great art is timeless. Paul Glenshaw examines the iconic painting Guernica by Pablo Picasso, exploring its historical context, delving into the era of its artist, the present he inhabited, and what shaped his vision and creations. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Date of event
Wednesday, September 2, 2020 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

The Language of Butterflies: A Message of Hope

Live Streaming

The fragile beauty and astounding endurance of butterflies have long fascinated us. Science journalist Wendy Williams looks at how scientists, gardeners, naturalists, and citizen scientists joined together to decipher the secrets of butterflies in order to protect them—and to learn what they might tell us about meeting the challenges of climate change.

Date of event
Wednesday, September 2, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Democracy: Lessons from the Ancient Greeks

Live Streaming

As our nation experiences another election season, historian Diane Harris Cline examines how ancient Greece’s political system reflects a civilization that valued and encouraged literacy and education, a love of beauty, technological and intellectual progress, and civic engagement.

Date of event
Thursday, September 3, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Vermeer: In Praise of the Ordinary

Live Streaming

Explore the legacy of painter Johannes Vermeer, a master of light and color whose paintings captured the beauty and meaning of everyday life, with art historian Aneta Georgievska-Shine. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Date of event
Friday, September 4 to 25, 2020 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. ET

The Ottoman Empire's Legacy

Live Streaming

In the early 16th century, the expanding Ottoman Empire became a political and economic powerhouse that continued to flourish until the early 20th century. Historian and author Alan Mikhail examines one of the key factors in its dominance: the rule of Selim, the empire’s most significant, powerful, and feared sultan.

Date of event
Tuesday, September 8, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Bird Brains: How Birds Talk, Work, Play, Parent, and Think

Live Streaming

Scientists are reevaluating the traditional view of how birds conduct their lives, uncovering a remarkable intelligence that encompasses actions once considered uniquely human. From avian cheating and kidnapping to collaboration and altruism, author Jennifer Ackerman discusses her investigation into the bird way of being.

Date of event
Wednesday, September 9, 2020 - 7:00 p.m. ET

The Supreme Court: A Preview of the New Term

Live Streaming

Each fall, the Supreme Court justices begin hearing and deliberating the country’s most important—and often most controversial—legal cases. Get in on the conversation as a panel of legal experts on the Supreme Court preview and debate critical issues raised in some of the cases the court will take up.

Date of event
Thursday, September 10, 2020 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

William Faulkner and the Civil War

Live Streaming

The long shadow of the Civil War hangs over the series of great novels that William Faulkner wrote about a largely un-Reconstructed South. Author Michael Gorra sheds light on the inner and outer forces that shaped Faulkner’s literary imagination and discusses how the war is an inescapable point of reference in his characters.

Date of event
Thursday, September 10, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Heaven and Hell: Perspectives on the Afterlife

Live Streaming

Bart Ehrman, a leading authority on early Christianity, examines ancient Near East, Greek, and Roman cultures, the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and other sources to trace how the nature of the afterlife became a central focus in Western religion.

Date of event
Saturday, September 12, 2020 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. ET

Charlemagne: Father of Europe

Live Streaming

The greatest of the barbarian rulers who rose to power after the fall of the Roman Empire was both a warrior king marked by a lust for territory and plunder and a great patron of the arts, learning, and religion. Historian Richard Abels explores the defining facets of the man and the myth behind the so-called Father of Europe.

Date of event
Monday, September 14, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Anti-Semitism in America

Live Streaming

Pamela Nadell, director of the Jewish Studies program at American University, traces the history of anti-Semitism in the United States from colonial days to its dangerous contemporary rise and examines how that resurgence forces the nation to address its uniquely American forms.

Date of event
Tuesday, September 15, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Stellar Astronomy: The Fall Colors of Stars

Live Streaming

As part of Space Tuesdays with George Mason University Observatory, Peter Plavchan and Michael Summers, professors of astronomy and physics at GMU, explore stellar evolution and the life and death of red giants, yellow suns, and brown dwarfs.

Date of event
Tuesday, September 15, 2020 - 8:00 p.m. ET

The Complicated, Controversial Lives of British Royal Consorts

Live Streaming

What happens when there’s a power struggle within a power couple? Tudor scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger examines some of Britain’s most famous royal pairs and the challenges they faced in maintaining a happy marriage while one of them ruled the kingdom.

Date of event
Thursday, September 17, 2020 - 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET

Architecture of Faith: The History and Diversity of the World's Great Mosques

Live Streaming

Typically associated with domes, minarets, and rich decoration, mosques have achieved iconic status in popular conceptions of Islamic art and culture. Ünver Rüstem, assistant professor of Islamic art and architecture at Johns Hopkins University, explores the geographical and cultural diversity of the Islamic world through mosques that extend from Spain to India and from the 7th century into our own time.

Date of event
Thursday, September 17, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Wine Regions of France and Italy: Northern Italy

Live Streaming

Join Food and Wine magazine’s 2019 Sommelier of the Year Erik Segelbaum in an enjoyable interactive workshop series designed to boost the wine IQ of both novices and seasoned aficionados. He dives into the worlds of French and Italian wine, covering four regions whose output is world-renowned—and you follow along with an at-home tasting kit. This workshop focuses on Northern Italy wine regions.

Date of event
Friday, September 18, 2020 - 6:00 p.m. ET

The Women Who Ruled the East End: Remarkable Tales of Wartime London

Live Streaming

Women in aprons and button-up boots were the beating heart of the tenement neighborhoods that serve as the backdrop for the PBS series “Call the Midwife.” These no-nonsense matriarchs who ruled London’s sooty cobblestone streets responded with astonishing ingenuity, resilience, and strength as they faced the horrors of WWII just beyond their own front doors. Join author Kate Thompson and historian Alan Capps as they delve deep into the social history of some truly remarkable women.

Date of event
Monday, September 21, 2020 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Windows on the World: Reading Literature from Many Cultures

Live Streaming

Join Lisbeth Strimple Fuisz of Georgetown University in spirited lectures and informal discussions about novels that explore stories set in Spain, India, the Dominican Republic, and the world of classical Greek mythology. This session discusses In the Time of Butterflies by Julia Alvarez.

Date of event
Monday, September 21, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Why Brexit?

Live Streaming

As she traces Brexit’s complicated past, present, and future, historian Jennifer Paxton examines issues that reveal the tensions at the heart of a nation that may reshape the United Kingdom more profoundly than any political event in the past 300 years.

Date of event
Tuesday, September 22, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Extreme Weather and Climate: Adaptation in a Changing World

Live Streaming

Meeting the shock and awe of extreme floods, droughts, storms, and fires calls for plans and action—and authoritative scientific information. Roger S. Pulwarty, the senior scientist in the physical sciences division at NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory, examines the significance and sources of that information as countries, communities, and businesses make critical decisions in response to changing weather and extreme climate trends.

Date of event
Wednesday, September 23, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

The 1920s: Welcome to the New World

Live Streaming

The end of the Great War ushered in a decade of economic prosperity and cultural dynamism unprecedented in America. Stef Woods, a popular speaker on cultural topics, looks at the explosion of new directions in the 1920s, and considers what comparisons may be drawn between that still-resonant era and today, as our ’20s begins. 

Date of event
Tuesday, September 29, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Bakari Sellers: My Vanishing Country

Live Streaming

Bakari Sellers, a CNN analyst and one of the youngest state representatives in South Carolina history, examines the plight of the South's dwindling rural population of black working-class men and women. Drawing on his new book My Vanishing Country, he surveys the struggles that shape their lives: gaining access to healthcare, making ends meet as factories shut down, holding on to traditions as towns erode, and forging a path forward without succumbing to despair.

Date of event
Wednesday, September 30, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Windows on the World: Reading Literature from Many Cultures

Live Streaming

Join Lisbeth Strimple Fuisz of Georgetown University in spirited lectures and informal discussions about compelling novels that explore stories set in Spain, India, the Dominican Republic, and the world of classical Greek mythology. This session discusses The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy.

Date of event
Monday, October 19, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Windows on the World: Reading Literature from Many Cultures

Live Streaming

Join Lisbeth Strimple Fuisz of Georgetown University in spirited lectures and informal discussions about novels that explore stories set in Spain, India, the Dominican Republic, and the world of classical Greek mythology. This session discusses The Penelopiad by Margaret Atwood.

Date of event
Monday, November 16, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. ET