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Smithsonian Associates - Entertaining, Informative, Eclectic, Insightful

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Course
Monday, August 23, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Join Author Michael Gorra in an exploration of works by William Faulkner, one of the greatest—and most problematic—figures in American literature. This session focuses on Light in August.

Members-Only Program
Friday, September 10, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

In this members-only series led by veteran arts educator Roberta Gasbarre, go behind the scenes and into the working lives of some of the most intriguing people from all across the Smithsonian and Washington’s worlds of culture, science, and education. This program features Felix Contreras, co-creator and host of Alt.Latino, NPR's pioneering radio show and podcast celebrating Latin alternative music and world Latino culture.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, September 10, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Food markets and food halls are a hot culinary trend right now, but Baltimore is home to the nation’s oldest continuously operating public market system, one that draws on the harvest of Marlyand farms and the Chesapeake Bay. Christine Rai explores each of the city’s markets, delving into their history, architecture, and evolution, as well as stories of the city’s traditional produce vendors, the arabbers and their iconic horse-drawn carts.

Course
Wednesday, September 15, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

In this introductory course, music educator and conductor Ernest Johnson offers the perfect opportunities to gain or expand your knowledge of music theory, the essential language and elements of musical notation and composition for singers or instrumentalists.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, September 17, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

The Barnes is often considered the greatest post-impressionist and early-modern art collection in the world. Join Barnes Foundation educator Penny Hansen as she covers its history and uses unique high-definition Deep Zoom technology to offer closeup looks masterpiece that reveal their surfaces and details in ways that bring the art and the artists to vivid life. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, September 21, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Pulitzer Prize-winning author and columnist George F. Will casts a careful eye on what defines the American experience as he explores an array of topics including drug policy and the criminal justice system; the First Amendment; meritocracy and education; Frank Sinatra, Bob Dylan, and The Beach Boys; and, yes, the morality of enjoying football.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, September 22, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

NASA’s long-awaited Hubble Space Telescope successor will complement and extend the discoveries of the Hubble Space Telescope, with a greatly improved sensitivity that enables it to look much closer to the beginning of time and for the unobserved formation of the first galaxies. Astrophysicist John Mather reviews Webb’s development, capabilities, and planned observing program.

Course
Monday, September 27, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay and her expert guests for an image-rich lunchtime lecture series focusing on fascinating decorative arts and design topics. This session explores what our collections tell us about our time, our values, and ourselves. Part of a 3-session Decorative Arts fall series.

Course
Monday, September 27, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Join Author Michael Gorra in an exploration of works by William Faulkner, one of the greatest—and most problematic—figures in American literature. This session focuses on Absalom, Absalom!

Tour
Friday, October 1, 2021 - 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. ET

From the Woman Suffrage Procession along Pennsylvania Avenue in 1913 to the massive Million Man March in 1995, Washington, D.C. was the setting for many of the most historic social and political American protests of the 20th century. Enjoy a fall walk with lecturer Dave Price and discover the stories behind the most significant of these protests.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, October 1, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Springtime in Washington is legendary, but what about that other fabulous season, fall? Join author and tree expert Melanie Choukas-Bradley on a virtual tour through autumn in the capital and see why its beauty should be as celebrated as spring’s cherry blossoms.

Tour
Sunday, October 3, 2021 - 7:45 a.m. to 6:15 p.m. ET

Regional historian Hayden Mathews explores the rich heritage of this lovely Eastern Shore town, focusing on both land and sea. The day includes a cruise on a replica of an 18th-century vessel, as well as a historic-district walking tour guided by Chestertown’s mayor.

Course
Monday, October 4, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay and her expert guests for an image-rich lunchtime lecture series focusing on fascinating decorative arts and design topics. This session explores how to spot the originals and the knockoffs among classic mid-century modern furniture pieces. Part of a 3-session Decorative Arts fall series.

Tour
Tuesday, October 5, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

From the Woman Suffrage Procession along Pennsylvania Avenue in 1913 to the massive Million Man March in 1995, Washington, D.C. was the setting for many of the most historic social and political American protests of the 20th century. Enjoy a fall walk with lecturer Dave Price and discover the stories behind the most significant of these protests.

Course
Tuesday, October 5, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

In an advanced series, music educator and conductor Ernest Johnson offers a more detailed analysis of melody and harmony and weekly assignments in ear-training, sight-reading, composition, and musical dictation.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, October 5, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Can a Renaissance feast tell us about perspective in painting? Drawing on his new book The Hungry Eye, Leonard Barkan, a professor of comparative literature at Princeton University, explores the central role of food and drink in literature, art, philosophy, religion, and statecraft from antiquity to the Renaissance.

Course
Wednesday, October 6, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Documentary filmmaker and writer Sara Lukinson looks at three remarkable memoirs, as different in approach and style as the lives they led. In this session, discuss Born a Crime by comic Trevor Noah who recounts his childhood in apartheid South Africa.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, October 7, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover the power of reflective writing guided by the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, Mary Hall Surface. Inspired by works of art by Hudson River landscape painter Jasper Francis Cropse and poetry by Mary Oliver, explore the lessons that the season of autumn offers us when we slow down, look closely, and reflect.

Course
Thursday, October 7, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Join popular speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin for a fascinating exploration into the intimate relationship between the visible and invisible arts, and how music can literally bind the arts together in this fall series. This session focuses on Marc Chagall and opera. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, October 7, 2021 - 8:00 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. ET

Award-winning actor and food obsessive Stanley Tucci grew up in an Italian American family that spent every night around the kitchen table. Join him for a big night as he discusses his favorite food memories; his recent series for CNN; his new book, Taste: My Life Through Food; and what he’s most looking forward to in the future of food. Mangia!

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, October 8, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Ambitious, extravagant, progressive, and oftentimes sexually notorious, the Sforza family took over the ducal throne of Milan in 1450, ushering in a period of unprecedented peace and prosperity. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo reveals how Milan and its rulers exemplified the political, cultural, religious, and economic aspirations of Renaissance Italy. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Tuesday, October 12, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Powerful, thrilling, epic, and eloquent, choral music embodies a glorious musical tradition. Saul Lilienstein leads an insightful survey of great works and their composers from the Renaissance through the 20th century.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, October 12, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

The Patagonia region of South America has long attracted naturalists and explorers to unravel the mysteries of its dramatic landscape. Join geologist Kirt Kempter on a virtual tour of the region including highlights such as national parks, glaciers, and several picturesque volcanoes of the southern Andes.

Course
Wednesday, October 13, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

The radical innovations made by European and American painters and sculptors between 1900 and 1960 forever altered the way we think about visual art. In a richly illustrated course, art historian Nancy G. Heller discusses major works by the period’s seminal painters and sculptors, emphasizing their broader socio-political and aesthetic contexts. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, October 13, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. ET

From day one of the Covid pandemic, Anthony Fauci has been front and center in the fight to destroy the virus. Now, as the crisis begins to ease, the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases helps us understand—from a scientific viewpoint—where we have been and what the post-pandemic world will look like.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, October 13, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Historian Alexander Mikaberidze breaks with the traditional focus on Napoleon and instead explores his remarkable family which produced two emperors and three kings, not to mention princes, poets, neurotics, heroes of the French Résistance, and even the founder of the FBI.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, October 14, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Albert Barnes amassed 181 works by Pierre-August Renoir—the world’s largest collection. Barnes Foundation educator Penny Hansen uses high-definition Deep Zoom technology to offer remarkable close-up views of his paintings as she examines his stylistic changes over the years, and discusses Barnes’ great affinity for Renoir, especially his late works. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Thursday, October 14, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Join popular speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin for a fascinating exploration into the intimate relationship between the visible and invisible arts, and how music can literally bind the arts together in this fall series. This session focuses on symbols and allegories. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, October 16, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Dante’s epic poem has provided inspiration for countless artists—from manuscript illuminators to painters and sculptors from a variety of cultures and time periods. Art historian Aneta Georgievska Shine explores some of the greatest of those works by such artists as Botticelli, Blake, Redon, and Rodin. (World Art History Certificate elective,1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, October 17, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Film music can inspire and romance us, salvage a bad movie and make a good one great. In this weekend series, speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin explores the many elements that go into creating an effective score and showcase the memorable work of some of the leading masters of the form. Fasten your seatbelts…it’s going to be a fabulous ride! This session focuses on film music from Jaws, Laura, and The Third Man.

Tour
Sunday, October 17, 2021 - 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. ET

From the Woman Suffrage Procession along Pennsylvania Avenue in 1913 to the massive Million Man March in 1995, Washington, D.C. was the setting for many of the most historic social and political American protests of the 20th century. Enjoy a fall walk with lecturer Dave Price and discover the stories behind the most significant of these protests.

Course
Monday, October 18, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay and her expert guests for an image-rich lunchtime lecture series focusing on fascinating decorative arts and design topics. This session offers some valuable insider’s tips on navigating today’s changing auction world. Part of a 3-session Decorative Arts fall series.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, October 18, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Understanding the machinations of British diplomacy during World War I is essential to comprehending today’s Middle East. Historian Ralph Nurnberger suveys the fascinating cast of characters involved in often-contradictory secret negotiations over boundaries, as well as how the results contributed to more than a century of conflicts in the region and the establishment of the modern states of Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, and Iraq.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, October 19, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Who gets commemorated in art and why? Drawing on her new book Twelve Caesars: Images of Power from the Ancient World to the Modern, noted classicist Mary Beard tells the story of how for more than two millennia portraits of the rich, powerful, and famous in the western world have been shaped by the image of Roman emperors, from the ruthless Julius Caesar to the fly-torturing Domitian. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, October 19, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

During the Renaissance, artists began to portray plants and animals with increased fidelity to nature, and natural philosophers began to replace myths with scientific explanations of the natural world. Kay Etheridge, a biology professor at Gettysburg College, traces how revolutionary changes in the ways animals and plants were visually portrayed led to a transformation in our understanding of the world around us.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, October 19, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Great art is timeless, and speaks to us across time, culture and space. Yet great works come from real people living real lives. Paul Glenshaw looks at three iconic works by Jacques-Louis David that capture Napoleon and how the collaboration of artist and subject established an imperial image for the world. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Wednesday, October 20, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Documentary filmmaker and writer Sara Lukinson looks at three remarkable memoirs, as different in approach and style as the lives they led. In this session, discuss A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway which conjures a fabled youth in Paris of the 1920s.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, October 20, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Historian Christopher Hamner examines Grant’s often-overlooked 1864 Overland Campaign to illustrate how his effectiveness as a military commander proved crucial in driving the Union toward its overall victory the following year.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, October 20, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Dorie Greenspan's name is synonymous with baking—and always-tempting recipies. Join her in conversation with Zoë François, host of "Zoë Bakes" on the Magnolia Network, as she reflects on the art of baking, shares stories and great home baking  tips, and talks about how she created her newest book, Baking With Dorie.

Course
Thursday, October 21, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Join popular speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin for a fascinating exploration into the intimate relationship between the visible and invisible arts, and how music can literally bind the arts together in this fall series. This session focuses on The Sharp Family. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, October 21, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

We live surrounded by drowned worlds according to geologist Patrick Nunn. Join him live from Australia as he recounts the histories of some of these shadow lands and what their understanding implies, drawing on research informed by science as well as human memories of submerged lands retained in oral traditions and eyewitness observations that became encoded in myth.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, October 21, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Follow the writer’s footsteps through the capital’s downtown as historian Garrett Peck examines the urban backdrop against which Whitman carved out a role as a nurse to Civil War soldiers; met the love of his life; worked as a federal clerk; and built a community through his literary circle.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, October 22, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The greatest painter of the Venetian Renaissance, Titian, was also the first whose clientele was largely international. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo surveys how the golden age of the Serenissima Republic is reflected in the art Titian generated for its churches, confraternities, and palaces. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, October 24, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Film music can inspire and romance us, salvage a bad movie and make a good one great. In this weekend series, speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin explores the many elements that go into creating an effective score and showcase the memorable work of some of the leading masters of the form. Fasten your seatbelts…it’s going to be a fabulous ride! This session focuses on film music from The Madness of King George, Chicken Run, and Dr. Zhivago.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, October 25, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Oprah Winfrey’s interview with Harry and Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex riveted a public desperate for distraction from the ongoing pandemic. Historian Julie Taddeo explores their withdrawal from the royal family—Megxit—and its fallout within a larger historical context, linking it to past scandals from the Georgian era through the late 20th century.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, October 27, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Hollywood can imagine impressive and convincing alien creatures, but is there any science behind our understanding of what extraterrestrial life might be like?  Although we don’t know whether they’ll be green, zoologist Arik Kershenbaum shares his insights into how familiar they might be, using lessons from the behaviors that we see in animals on our own planet.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, October 27, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Whether it be fish nurseries, migratory bird pit stops, or natural water filterers, wetlands provide near limitless value to humans and wildlife around the world. Naturalist Liana Vitali of Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary in Upper Marlboro, Maryland, offers an audio-visual immersion into the marshes, ponds, swamps, and peat bogs of North America to discover just how important these ecosystems are to life on Earth.

Course
Thursday, October 28, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Join popular speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin for a fascinating exploration into the intimate relationship between the visible and invisible arts, and how music can literally bind the arts together in this fall series. This session focuses on The Artist as Musician, the Composer as Model. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, October 28, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Like a select few in music—Hoagy, Duke, Elvis, Wynton, Dolly—you recognize her by her first name alone. Join John Edward Hasse, co-curator of the long-running Smithsonian exhibition Ella Fitzgerald: First Lady of Song, as he draws on film and video clips, rare photographs, and original recordings to provide insights into her extraordinary journey from shy orphan to beloved international celebrity.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, October 28, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

To wage their bitter war with the powerful British Empire from 1919 to 1921, Irish nationalists turned to novel tactics both military and political: a strategy of assassinations, hit-and-run raids, and—a new concept—urban guerrilla warfare. Historian Kevin Matthews discusses how this conflict set the standard for other independence struggles in the 20th century.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, October 30, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Although less famous than their Tudor cousins, the Scottish Stuarts ruled over a period of growth and chaos that changed England and Scotland forever. Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger looks at the eventful hundred years of the Stuart reign.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, October 30, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. ET

Civilizations have risen and fallen for centuries on the banks of the Mekong River. Long before there was Phnom Penh, Hanoi, or Vientiane, there were the settlements in the areas now known as Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, and Thailand. Art historian Robert DeCaroli investigates the cultures that emerged along this massive 2,700-mile-long river. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 1, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Whether created by artists such as Calder, Oldenburg, and Christo or generated from within communities, public art can powerfully speak to viewers through a wide variety of images, messages, materials, and settings. Art historian Janetta Rebold Benton surveys public art’s many forms, its creative roots and makers, and its social value. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 1, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Washington, D.C., has given much to the musical world beyond its best-known export, Duke Ellington. In a new series of programs, musician, broadcaster, and historian Ken Avis spotlights the city’s music traditions and how social change, technology, and business innovations shaped the sounds that emerged from D.C.—a political town with a serious music habit. This session focuses on D.C.'s acoustic folk and blues traditions.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 2, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for three online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on Character: Discover Dimensions.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 2, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Since its very beginning, Hollywood has made audiences laugh in forms from slapstick to screwball, romance to social satire, musicals to gross-out teen films. Media expert Brian Rose looks at major highlights of screen comedy over the last 125 years, drawing on more than 40 examples from Hollywood’s funniest films. Prepare to LOL.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 2, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

To call Cokie Roberts a legendary journalist merely scratches the surface of the life of this bestselling author and champion for women who was a fixture on national radio and television for 40 years. Journalist, author, and educator Steve Roberts, Cokie’s husband of 53 years, reflects on her many accomplishments and how she lived each day with a devotion to helping others.

Course
Wednesday, November 3, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Documentary filmmaker and writer Sara Lukinson looks at three remarkable memoirs, as different in approach and style as the lives they led. In this session, discuss Conundrum by travel writer Jan Morris who gives a spellbinding account of her riskiest journey, becoming another physical version of herself.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, November 5, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Many iconic churches and palaces in Florence were constructed to represent wealth and power, but architect Filippo Brunelleschi’s Hospital of the Innocents was the first institution in the world to be dedicated to the well-being of children. Renaissance art historian Elaine Ruffolo explores its architecture and magnificent charitable history. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, November 7, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Film music can inspire and romance us, salvage a bad movie and make a good one great. In this weekend series, speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin explores the many elements that go into creating an effective score and showcase the memorable work of some of the leading masters of the form. Fasten your seatbelts…it’s going to be a fabulous ride! This session focuses on film music from The Red Pony, High Noon, and The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 8, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

In the 1890s, the first great American musical craze, ragtime, swept the nation—and the sounds of the parlor piano would never be the same. Composer and pianist Orrin Grossman traces the form from its beginnings to the more complex styles of stride and “novelty” piano in a lively and entertaining program that includes Joplin’s wonderful rags and a few of his own arrangements of favorite Gershwin’s songs.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 9, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for three online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on Setting: Explore Place and Time.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 9, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

What was it like to be a Jewish citizen in Venice between their settlement there in the 16th century to the end of World War II? From the beginning, the rules that governed Jewish life in the ghetto—a Venetian word—contrasted greatly with those outside the quarter. Historian Monica Chojnacka highlights the complicated history of the Venetian Jews and places it in the context of greater European history.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 9, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Eleanor of Aquitaine is the stuff of legend. Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger considers how the many stories have grown from the real life of the ambitious and powerful woman who managed to become queen consort of England and France and shaped the reigns of two of England’s most famous kings: Richard the Lionheart and King John.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, November 13, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

For nearly two millennia, Augustine’s arguments, insights, and ideas on faith have profoundly shaped the Western intellectual tradition. Augustine scholar Scott MacDonald explores some of those enduringly compelling ideas.

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, November 14, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Film music can inspire and romance us, salvage a bad movie and make a good one great. In this weekend series, speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin explores the many elements that go into creating an effective score and showcase the memorable work of some of the leading masters of the form. Fasten your seatbelts…it’s going to be a fabulous ride! This session focuses on film music from To Kill a Mockingbird, Psycho, and Planet of the Apes.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 15, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Washington, D.C., has given much to the musical world beyond its best-known export, Duke Ellington. In a new series of programs, musician, broadcaster, and historian Ken Avis spotlights the city’s music traditions and how social change, technology, and business innovations shaped the sounds that emerged from D.C.—a political town with a serious music habit. This session focuses on D.C.'s soul, funk, and go-go traditions.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 15, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

The distinctive rock-cut architecture of Ajanta, Ellora, Elephanta, Badami, and other temple sites has captured the imaginations of India’s visitors and devotees for centuries. Art historian Robert DeCaroli examines what we know about their histories, how they were made, and what was required to maintain them in antiquity—as well as how they are being protected from threats today. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 16, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for three online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on Story: Imagine Possibilities.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Art historian Bonita Billman examines how a group of painters created powerful and personal works that revealed unvarnished truths about urban life in the early 20th century. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

For thousands of years people have wondered if there are planets like Earth, if they’re common, and if any have signs of life. Sara Seager, a professor of physics and planetary science at MIT who is one of the leading experts on the search for Earth-like planets, shares the latest advances in this revolutionary field. Afterward, Peter Plavchan, a professor of physics and astronomy at George Mason University, brings the skies into your living room with remote control of the GMU Observatory.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 29, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Washington, D.C., has given much to the musical world beyond its best-known export, Duke Ellington. In a new series of programs, musician, broadcaster, and historian Ken Avis spotlights the city’s music traditions and how social change, technology, and business innovations shaped the sounds that emerged from D.C.—a political town with a serious music habit. This session focuses on D.C.'s 21st century music scene.