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Restaurateur Danny Meyer: Bringing Manhattan Style to DC Dining

Local burger fans love Shake Shack, and soon there’ll be another restaurant from Danny Meyer in town—Maialino, which pays homage to Rome’s seafood trattorias. Join the man behind some of New York’s most notable eateries as he talks about opening a restaurant in Washington, his career in the culinary world, and more.

Date of event
Thursday, February 20, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

Sapporo-Style Ramen: A Regional Rage

Japanese foodies take their ramen—which boasts more than 30 regional variations—very seriously. The team behind D.C.’s popular Bantam King, Daikaya, and Haikan restaurants explores the essentials of Sapporo-style ramen, how they prepare it, and how best to enjoy it. Then, get a taste of your own when you sit down for lunch at Haikan.

Date of event
Saturday, March 7, 2020 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Jewish Music: Many Languages, One Heart

What is Jewish music? In this 3-part series, the answers will surprise you as cantor and choral director Ramón Tasat leads discussions about this intriguing history, which segue into live performances. This program focuses on French and Jewish musical traditions.

Date of event
Sunday, March 8, 2020 - 4:00 p.m.

The Smithsonian Greenhouses and How They Grow

One of the joys of a Smithsonian visit in any season is the gloriously varied greenery and flowers that brighten your paths indoors and out. Get a preview of what spring will look like on the National Mall with a visit to the source of all that natural beauty: the Smithsonian Gardens greenhouse facility in Suitland, Maryland.

Date of event
Thursday, March 12, 2020 - 9:30 a.m.

Charlemagne: The Paradoxical Conqueror

The greatest of the barbarian rulers who rose to power after the fall of the Roman Empire was both a warrior king marked by a lust for territory and plunder and a great patron of the arts, learning, and religion. Historian Richard Abels explores the defining facets of the man and the myth behind the so-called Father of Europe.

Date of event
Thursday, March 12, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

Sears Houses of Arlington

Sold as prefabricated kits during the first half of the 20th century, affordable dwellings from Sears Roebuck and Company defined the character of countless American communities. Join historian Dakota Springston on a bus tour through historic Virginia neighborhoods to view the distinctive exteriors of Sears homes.

Date of event
Saturday, March 14, 2020 - 10:00 a.m.

Author Erik Larson on Churchill's Darkest Year

MEMBERS-ONLY PROGRAM: Drawing on his new book The Splendid and the Vile, Erik Larson offers a vivid portrait of London and Winston Churchill during the Blitz, detailing how the prime minister taught the British people “the art of being fearless.” Ticket includes a copy of The Splendid and the Vile.

Date of event
Monday, March 16, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

Life Lessons with Judith Viorst: From Under 9 to Nearing 90

Judith Viorst’s sharp observations about adulting—reflected in her series of decade-focused poetry books—offer just as much fun and insights as her beloved children’s stories. Join her as she shares her wry wisdom on such matters as aging, love, marriage, friendship, and happiness drawn from her newest title, Nearing 90 and Other Comedies of Late Life.

Date of event
Monday, March 16, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

Ireland's Fight for Freedom

Ireland’s bitter war with the British Empire from 1919 to 1921 created the template for other independence struggles in the 20th century. Historian Kevin Matthews examines its development and tactics—and the price that Ireland paid for freedom.

Date of event
Tuesday, March 17, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

Decoding the Royal Wardrobe: From the Tudors to Today

There's more to the gowns, crowns, uniforms, and regalia of British royalty than meets the eye. Join Tudor scholar Carol Ann Lloyd Stanger for a glimpse into the palace closet that reveals how monarchs used their wardrobes to project power, influence, politics, and personality.

Date of event
Wednesday, March 18, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

Forensic Anthropologist Kathy Reichs

Kathy Reichs is known for her crime-fiction novels chronicling the adventures of Temperance (Bones) Brennan, a forensic anthropologist at the fictional Jeffersonian Institute. Join her as she uncovers the challenges of translating real-life drama into the stuff of fiction, discusses her dual careers, and shares stories behind her newest novel, A Conspiracy of Bones.

Date of event
Wednesday, March 18, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

The Smithsonian Greenhouses and How They Grow

One of the joys of a Smithsonian visit in any season is the gloriously varied greenery and flowers that brighten your paths indoors and out. Get a preview of what spring will look like on the National Mall with a visit to the source of all that natural beauty: the Smithsonian Gardens greenhouse facility in Suitland, Maryland.

Date of event
Thursday, March 19, 2020 - 12:30 p.m.

Women in Wartime: Stories from Gettysburg

Thousands of disparate women were connected by their experiences amid the horrors of the Civil War’s bloodiest battle. Author Chuck Raasch retells their often-overlooked stories of bravery and life-changing actions at the sites on which they unfolded at Gettysburg National Military Park.

Date of event
Saturday, March 21, 2020 - 8:30 a.m.

Writing a Successful Screenplay

You've got a brilliant idea for a terrific film. Your next move is to master the steps in turning it into a reality on the screen. Spend a valuable two days with Marc Lapadula, a screenwriting professor at Yale University, as he analyzes the key ingredients of a successful script.

Date of event
Saturday, March 21 and Sunday, March 22, 2020 - 9:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Africa in the African American Artistic Imagination

The impact of African art on African Americans artists has been long debated. Art historian Kevin Tervala examines the ways in which African American artists have—or have not—engaged with the art of the African continent as reflected in works from early 20th-century pioneers and more contemporary artists. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Date of event
Tuesday, March 24, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

European Microstates: Survival of the Smallest

In an age of nation-states, Europe contains the world’s largest collection of a dozen countries that are literally too small to appear on most maps of the continent. Historian Charles Ingrao delves into the remarkable resilience of these microstates by examining the historical forces that shaped them.

Date of event
Tuesday, March 24, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

Creativity in Dark Times: Artists and Writers of the New Deal

Author David Taylor looks at some of the artists and writers for whom the Federal Writers’ Project and the Federal Arts Project gave them a new purpose: recording American life. Their works—some of which remain controversial—provide a vivid portrait a nation struggling for recovery and identity during the Great Depression.

Date of event
Wednesday, March 25, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

A History of the British Royal Family

Plantagenets and Tudors and Windsors, oh my! Tudor scholar Carol Ann Lloyd Stanger traces a path through the twists and turns of the royals and rebels who have ruled England for nearly a thousand years.

Date of event
Thursday, March 26 to April 23, 2020 - 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Forgotten No More: Rediscovering Remarkable Women

Women have been making strides in their fields that have often being overlooked, uncredited, or forgotten by time. Celebrate Women’s History Month by spending a fascinating day with four experts who bring to light an array of remarkable women who have lived in the shadows of history far too long.

Date of event
Saturday, March 28, 2020 - 9:30 a.m.

Sears Houses of Arlington

Sold as prefabricated kits during the first half of the 20th century, affordable dwellings from Sears Roebuck and Company defined the character of countless American communities. Join historian Dakota Springston on a bus tour through historic Virginia neighborhoods to view the distinctive exteriors of Sears homes.

Date of event
Sunday, March 29, 2020 - 10:00 a.m.

Bagel and Lox: An Edible Icon

What’s better than the perfect shmear? Jewish historian Ted Merwin bites into the cultural history of the beloved breakfast sandwich of bagels and cured fish. Afterward, enjoy a classic combo with ingredients from local purveyors.

Date of event
Sunday, March 29, 2020 - 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Alexander von Humboldt: His World of Nature

He has more species named after him than any other human being. Learn why from Eleanor Jones Harvey, senior curator at the American Art Museum, who examines the fascinating life of German naturalist and explorer Alexander von Humboldt, one of the most influential intellectuals of the 19th century. 

Date of event
Sunday, March 29, 2020 - 3:00 p.m.

Leadership in Crisis: Defining Moments of Modern Presidencies

Leaders from Franklin Roosevelt to Donald Trump dealt with their defining moments in a variety of ways that forever changed our perceptions of them. As he surveys these responses, journalist Ken Walsh identifies what we have learned about presidential attributes and skills that matter most in trying times, and also takes a fresh look at President Trump through the prism of his crisis-filled administration.

Date of event
Tuesday, March 31, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

Extreme Weather and Climate: Adaptation in a Changing World

Meeting the shock and awe of extreme floods, droughts, storms, and fires calls for plans and action—and authoritative scientific information. Roger S. Pulwarty, the senior scientist in the physical sciences division at NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory, examines the significance and sources of that information as countries, communities, and businesses make critical decisions in response to changing weather and extreme climate trends.

Date of event
Tuesday, March 31, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

Celebrating Robert Frost: An American Poet

More than 50 years after his death, Robert Frost remains one of the most beloved and critically respected poets of all time. Author Daniel Stashower explores Frost’s life and legacy and actor Scott Sedar reads a selection of his most celebrated works.

Date of event
Wednesday, April 1, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

Exploring World Heritage Sites in Asia

Come on a virtual tour of four of the most intriguing UNESCO World Heritage sites in Asia, including both well-known and lesser-known sites with Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of history at American University.

Date of event
Thursday, April 2, April 23, May 14, and June 4, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

Start To Tell Your Family Story

You have a trove of wonderful family memories, but documenting them to share with the people you love can be a challenging undertaking. Bring your own mementos to inspire your work in this practical day led by writing coach Mathina Calliope, who provides the tools and guidance you need to move from daunted to accomplished.

Date of event
Saturday, April 4, 2020 - 9:30 a.m.

Vermeer: In Praise of the Ordinary

Explore the legacy of painter Johannes Vermeer, a master of light and color whose paintings captured the beauty and meaning of everyday life, with art historian Aneta Georgievska-Shine. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Date of event
Saturday, April 4, 2020 - 9:30 a.m.

Masters and Masterpieces of the 18th and 19th Centuries

Against a backdrop of a rapidly changing world, the 18th and 19th centuries brought forth a profusion of styles in art and architecture in Europe and America. Art historian Karin Alexis offers a cultural context for its creators as she traces the path from Rococo exuberance to a bold new realism. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Date of event
Tuesday, April 7 to May 5, 2020 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. (no class April 14)

The Art of India: From the Indus Valley to Independence

From its origins in the ancient civilization to the present, the complex culture of South Asia has given rise to some of the world’s most remarkable art. Art historian Robert DeCaroli highlights the artistic traditions and historical changes within the Indian subcontinent from the earliest archaeological evidence to the onset of colonialism. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Date of event
Wednesday, April 8 to May 6, 2020 - 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. (no class April 29)

The Best of Brooklyn

Brooklyn offers plenty of delights for lovers of art, music, nature, and of course, food. On this two-day visit, arts journalist and former Brooklynite Richard Selden introduces you to several of the borough’s top attractions.

Date of event
Depart: Sunday, April 19, 2020 - 7:00 a.m.
Return: Monday, April 20, 2020 - 9:30 p.m.

Jewish Music: Many Languages, One Heart

What is Jewish music? In this 3-part series, the answers will surprise you as cantor and choral director Ramón Tasat leads discussions about this intriguing history, which segue into live performances. This program focuses on the Jewish choral heritage in England.

Date of event
Sunday, April 26, 2020 - 4:00 p.m.

Hiking in Shenandoah National Park

In a two-day active getaway designed for outdoor lovers, explore Blue Ridge trails at the height of their spring beauty, and stay at an historic lodge on Skyline Drive that offers magnificent panoramic views of the mountain landscapes.

Date of event
Depart: Sunday, May 3, 2020 - 8:30 a.m.
Return: Monday, May 4, 2020 - 7:30 p.m.

Jewish Music: Many Languages, One Heart

What is Jewish music? In this 3-part series, the answers will surprise you as cantor and choral director Ramón Tasat leads discussions about this intriguing history, which segue into live performances. This program focuses on the history of Jewish music in Italy.

Date of event
Sunday, June 14, 2020 - 4:00 p.m.