Skip to main content

Seminars

Scholars of the New Testament and early Christianity continue to debate a number of crucial issues that matter not only to people of faith, but also to anyone interested in the history of the world’s largest religion. Following his previous “great controversies” seminar, Bart Ehrman, a leading authority on early Christianity, the New Testament, and the life of Jesus, returns to explore four more intriguing questions of faith and Biblical scholarship.

Event date
Saturday, September 7, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

Spend a morning getting a rare behind-the-scenes look at the Supreme Court—including the courtroom where cases are argued. Then, a panel of top legal experts previews the issues that will come before the court when the new session begins in October.

Event date
Thursday, September 12, 2019 - 10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Art historian Nancy G. Heller explores some of the Prado’s most important masterworks, traces its significance as a treasury of traditional Spanish art, and how a new gallery expansion has widened the museum’s scope to embrace contemporary works from Spain and elsewhere. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Event date
Saturday, September 14, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

Archaeologist Robert Stieglitz explores the history and cultural heritage of the civilization that brought urban life and literacy to the ancient western Mediterranean.

Event date
Saturday, September 14, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger leads a journey through the life and reign of Elizabeth I, following her from a child deemed a disappointment by her father to a tenacious and spirited young woman to a powerful monarch who changed the history of England and the world.

Event date
Saturday, September 21, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

Karen S. Franklin, a consultant for the Museum of Jewish Heritage, guides you through the process of successfully exploring your family’s past or Holocaust-era history using a wealth of genealogical resources—many of them online.

Event date
Sunday, September 22, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Why have stories from Greek and Roman mythology and the Bible engaged, entertained, and even shocked us for centuries? Art historian Lisa Passaglia Bauman offers an analysis of images, allegories, motifs, and context as she traces the iconography of these enduring tales from their ancient archetypes to contemporary interpretations. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Event date
Saturday, September 28, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Each November, thousands of writers around the world sign up for the National Novel Writing Month Challenge: drafting at least 50,000 words of their novel in "30 days and nights of literary abandon." Whether you take up the challenge or just want a solid base to begin or continue a novel at your own pace, this seminar, led by writing coach and author Kathryn Johnson, is for you.

Event date
Saturday, September 28, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Historian Richard Bell examines four extraordinary events that turned 13 loyal British colonies into a united confederation willing to go to war to achieve independence.

Event date
Saturday, October 5, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Art historian Aneta Georgievska-Shine embarks on a detailed exploration of the large-scale masterworks, intimate character studies, classically-inspired history paintings, and revealing (and sometimes enigmatic) self-portraits that marked Rembrandt as one of Western art’s most significant innovators. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Event date
Saturday, October 19, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Historian Alexander Mikaberidze examines the revolutionary fervor sparked by the French Revolution that spread across Europe, and which continues to serve as an inspiration of the finest principles of modern democracy, as well as a warning of what can happen when idealism goes wrong.

Event date
Saturday, October 19, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

How do professional historians work? In a unique workshop, Christopher Hamner, an associate professor of American history at George Mason University, demystifies this process by guiding you in how to think about and interpret the past.

Event date
Saturday, October 19, 2019 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Homer, the Bible, and the New Testament, are among the ancient texts that provide us knowledge of the ancient world. Explore the stories behind these and other sources, which still retain their narrative power into the 21st century.

Event date
Saturday, October 26, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

The world was stunned when, in the spring of 1940, Germany invaded and quickly defeated France. Ronald C. Rosbottom, a scholar of French and European history, examines why knowing more about the impact of both occupation and resistance during WWII helps us understand aspects of France’s present political and diplomatic environment.

Event date
Saturday, November 2, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

The urban aesthetic of Scandinavia reflects both the cherished past and innovations in architecture and design. Explore the creative contributions of noted artists, architects, and designers reflected in the region’s beautiful capitals with art historian Karin Alexis. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Event date
Saturday, November 2, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

When Victoria came to the throne, she was 18 years old, with no experience or training in governance, just as England was on the brink of enormous expansion and change. Learn how this young woman became one of the most iconic monarchs of all time.

Event date
Saturday, November 9, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

Issues of death, dying, and the meaning of life—and the afterlife—hold key places in the belief systems of the major religious traditions of the world.  Explore differing visions of these themes from a variety of Eastern and Western cultural perspectives.

Event date
Saturday, November 9, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.