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Smithsonian Associates - Entertaining, Informative, Eclectic, Insightful

Seminars

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, August 7, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Their scandals became the stuff of legends, but this royal family in just three generations, reshaped the monarchy and changed England, Europe, and the world. Scholar Carol Ann Lloyd Stanger of the Folger Shakespeare Library leads a look behind the Tudors’ carefully contrived image of monarchy.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, August 14, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The famous breaking of the Mayan code in the late 20th century revolutionized the study of these peoples and of ancient America. Humanities scholar George Scheper examines how interdisciplinary study of the Maya extends beyond the traditional archaeological focus to comprise political and social history, art, comparative religion, and ecology.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, August 21, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Whether you’re a beginner or an expert, you’ll be solving puzzles faster and more accurately after this intensive and fun seminar led by crossword editor for Newsday Stanley Newman.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, August 28, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in the Early Renaissance, examines one of the most productive, yet frustrating periods of Michelangelo’s artistic career—fulfilling his commissions from the Medici popes. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, September 11, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

The Civil War was the largest slave revolt in world history—and a war for freedom that hurled American history off its rails. It would end with the destruction of American slavery and the passage of the 13th Amendment. Historian Richard Bell explores the antislavery fight, focusing on the people whose courage and personal struggle led to the final victory.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, September 14, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Situated on top of an isolated rock plateau, Masada is an ancient fortress overlooking the Dead Sea. Historian Ralph Nurnberger explores the myths and realities of this famous settlement and site of Jewish resistance against Roman troops in 73 A.D. 

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, October 16, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Dante’s epic poem has provided inspiration for countless artists—from manuscript illuminators to painters and sculptors from a variety of cultures and time periods. Art historian Aneta Georgievska Shine explores some of the greatest of those works by such artists as Botticelli, Blake, Redon, and Rodin. (World Art History Certificate elective,1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, October 30, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Although less famous than their Tudor cousins, the Scottish Stuarts ruled over a period of growth and chaos that changed England and Scotland forever. Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger looks at the eventful hundred years of the Stuart reign.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, October 30, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. ET

Civilizations have risen and fallen for centuries on the banks of the Mekong River. Long before there was Phnom Penh, Hanoi, or Vientiane, there were the settlements in the areas now known as Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, and Thailand. Art historian Robert DeCaroli investigates the cultures that emerged along this massive 2,700-mile-long river. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, November 13, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

For nearly two millennia, Augustine’s arguments, insights, and ideas on faith have profoundly shaped the Western intellectual tradition. Augustine scholar Scott MacDonald explores some of those enduringly compelling ideas.