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Seminars
The South: Exploring an American Idea

Something about the South won’t let go of the American imagination. We remain fascinated by the region, its people, its culture. Historian Stephen D. Engle explores the South both as place and idea, and why its complexities remain in our modern culture.

Date
Saturday, April 28, 2018 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
The Romani Influence on European Music

In the distinctive musical language of the Romani people—developed from centuries of global influences—European composers found rich and passionate inspirations for their own works. Musical scholar Saul Lilienstein surveys its impact on classical works by Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninov, and others, as well as its echoes in flamenco and French jazz.

Date
Saturday, April 28, 2018 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
The Archaeology of Judaism

The period of post-biblical Judaism is exceedingly rich in archaeological evidence, found both in Israel and in the lands of an ever-widening Diaspora. In an illustrated all-day program, biblical scholar Gary Rendsburg synthesizes archaeological findings and literary evidence to reveal a multifaceted portrait of Jewish life in late antiquity.

Date
Saturday, May 5, 2018 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
Reigns of Queens: Women Who Independently Ruled Britannia

For most of English history, the possibility of a successful queen at the head of government was unthinkable. Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd Stanger surveys the women who shattered that royal glass ceiling to inherit the crown of Great Britain in their own right—a procession of monarchs that extends from the 12th century to today.

Date
Saturday, May 5, 2018 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
Chapels That Defined the Renaissance

The Scrovegni Chapel in Padua, Florence’s Brancacci Chapel, and the Sistine Chapel in Rome: each are home to works by artists who presented a revolutionary visual interpretation of Christian iconography. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Date
Sunday, May 6, 2018 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
The Artists of Renaissance Venice

Prosperous and open to new styles and cultural influences, Venice was one of the most flourishing urban and artistic centers of the 15th and 16th centuries. Join art historian Aneta Georgievska-Shine in a daylong survey of the artists who shaped this city into a unique place of beauty. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Date
Saturday, May 12, 2018 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Surrealism: The Canvas of Dreams

Artist and art historian Joseph Cassar leads a fascinating journey through the landscape of the imagination as reflected in the distinctive work of artists including Ernst, Arp, Miro, Magritte, and Dali. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Date
Saturday, June 2, 2018 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Four Giants of Spanish Painting: El Greco, Velazquez, Goya, and Miro

Art historian Nancy G. Heller focuses on a quartet of Spain’s most significant painters—unearthing their sources, analyzing their principal works, discussing the critical receptions of their pictures, and demonstrating their influences on later generations of visual artists, both within and beyond the borders of Spain. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Date
Saturday, June 16, 2018 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
The Symphonies of Franz Schubert: Tradition and Innovation, Passion and Sentiment

Musicologist and pianist Daniel E. Freeman offers insights into the unique appeal of Schubert’s best symphonies and the musical environment from which they originated. He also provides tips on how to listen to these beloved works with a greater appreciation of the techniques that the composer used to create them.

Date
Saturday, June 16, 2018 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
Exploring Anatolia: A Turkish Odyssey

Anatolia’s colorful history has left a windfall of riches—ancient ruins, ornate Byzantine churches, supremely elegant mosques, and splendid Ottoman palaces. Serif Yenen, a Turkish travel specialist and author, examines some of these cultural gems. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Date
Saturday, June 23, 2018 - 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
The Habsburg Legacy

The world is still dealing with the troublesome remains of the Habsburgs’ 400-year-old empire, whose abrupt removal from the heart of Europe drove many of the catastrophes of the 20th century. Historian Charles Ingrao examines the challenges that have been met and those that still confront us in coming to terms with that legacy. 

Date
Saturday, June 23, 2018 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.