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Seminars

Like any language, art has its own vocabulary—one in which you discover more meaning and gratification as your fluency increases. Spend a day with art historian Lisa Passaglia Bauman expanding your understanding of how art communicates, how to analyze and interpret it, and how to see in a cultural context. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Event date Saturday, February 23, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

The Renaissance is conventionally seen as a single, continuously unfolding movement that transformed the thinking and the artistic vision of the West. In this day-long seminar, art historian Nigel McGilchrist traces a rich visual itinerary through a different revolution: One rooted in multiple renaissances sparked in the cities of Florence, Bruges, and Venice. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Event date Saturday, March 2, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

Historian Kevin Matthews discusses Winston Churchill’s tempestuous career as an army officer, war correspondent, member of Parliament, and minister in both Liberal and Conservative governments to reveal a man too often hidden by the post-World War II legends that surround him.

Event date Saturday, March 9, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

The rich textures and monuments of Morocco’s four royal cities—Fez, Marrakesh, Meknes, and Rabat—reflect thousands of years of cultural crosscurrents. Art historian Lawrence Butler explores the artistic and architectural influences that shaped their distinctive and brilliant material cultures. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Event date Saturday, March 16, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

Art historian Joseph Cassar offers an in-depth look at the life and work of one of the best-loved impressionist painters, following him from the landscapes, cities, and seascapes that sparked his early works to the home and garden in Giverny that provided his inspiration for a lifetime. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Event date Saturday, March 23, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

The letters of Paul offer a myriad of insights into the foundations of Christianity. They also raise a number of still-debated questions about their author, and in some cases, their own authenticity. Margaret M. Mitchell, an authority on early Christian writings, assembles a portrait of Paul—and his lasting influence—from his epistles.

Event date Saturday, March 30, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

As the 20th century emerged, existentialism was the first cultural and philosophical movement to become a major factor in the shaping of modern intellectual thought about what it means to be human. This absorbing seminar examines its major themes, figures, and impact, guided by Francis J. Ambrosio of Georgetown University, a specialist in 20th-century European philosophy. 

Event date Saturday, April 6, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

Though most often defined by their positions in a marital parade full of intrigue, divorce, and death, the wives of Henry VIII deserve a closer look as individuals. Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd Stanger brings them out of the monarch’s shadow and reveals fuller portraits of the very different women who—often briefly—took their uneasy place beside the throne.

Event date Saturday, April 6, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

On the 500th anniversary of his death, art historian Aneta Georgievska Shine highlights some of the most remarkable aspects of the life, work, and creative thinking of perhaps the most diversely talented individual ever to have lived. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Event date Saturday, April 13, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Your voice is one of the most powerful and revealing things about you. Does yours support or detract from what you want to say? Spend a stimulating day with speech pathologist Laura Purcell Verdun to explore the practical foundations of healthy, effective, and dynamic voice use.

Event date Saturday, April 13, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Historian Stephen D. Engle argues reconstruction commenced not in April 1865 with peace, but in April 1861 with the onset of the Civil War. Learn how the Civil War changed a people and a nation as he surveys the wider scope of its social and political changes.

Event date Saturday, April 27, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

Few of the great composers were so profoundly affected by a city as was Mozart by Vienna, a preeminent center of cultural life in Europe of the late 18th century. Musicologist and pianist Daniel Freeman looks at the relationship between the glorious city and the composer, highlighting some of his greatest masterpieces created during his residence there.

Event date Saturday, April 27, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

We’ve held them in our hands forever, but books have radically shifted their forms over the millennia. Steven Galbraith, curator of the Cary Graphic Arts Collection at the Rochester Institute of Technology, unfolds the pages of their history and previews their future.

Event date Saturday, May 4, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

The turn of the 20th century found Europe’s greatest cities entering defining eras in their historical and cultural development. In a richly illustrated full-day program, lecturer George Scheper explores how the alignment of creative forces shaped three highly distinctive urban milieus—each nourished by the energy and excitement of new ideas and each witnessing the birth of modernism in the new century. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Event date Saturday, May 18, 2019 - 10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.