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Seminars

Historian Stephen D. Engle argues reconstruction commenced not in April 1865 with peace, but in April 1861 with the onset of the Civil War. Learn how the Civil War changed a people and a nation as he surveys the wider scope of its social and political changes.

Event date
Saturday, April 27, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

Few of the great composers were so profoundly affected by a city as was Mozart by Vienna, a preeminent center of cultural life in Europe of the late 18th century. Musicologist and pianist Daniel Freeman looks at the relationship between the glorious city and the composer, highlighting some of his greatest masterpieces created during his residence there.

Event date
Saturday, April 27, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

We’ve held them in our hands forever, but books have radically shifted their forms over the millennia. Steven Galbraith, curator of the Cary Graphic Arts Collection at the Rochester Institute of Technology, unfolds the pages of their history and previews their future.

Event date
Saturday, May 4, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

The creativity of its artists and the pride and religious devotion of its citizens combined to make the civic landscape of Siena a true reflection of the city’s values. Early Renaissance specialist Rocky Ruggiero examines how art and architecture were also deployed as potent weapons in its rivalry with neighboring Florence as each city jostled for dominance in Tuscany. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Event date
Saturday, May 4, 2019 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Beyond the Greeks, the Aegean world nurtured other civilizations notable for their architecture, material culture, and artistic creations. Archaeologist Robert R. Stieglitz, a specialist in maritime interconnections, explores the splendid legacies of the Minoan Cretes and the Cycladic-era islanders of Santorini. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Event date
Saturday, May 18, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

The turn of the 20th century found Europe’s greatest cities entering defining eras in their historical and cultural development. In a richly illustrated full-day program, lecturer George Scheper explores how the alignment of creative forces shaped three highly distinctive urban milieus—each nourished by the energy and excitement of new ideas and each witnessing the birth of modernism in the new century. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Event date
Saturday, May 18, 2019 - 10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Centuries of myriad religious traditions are reflected in daily life on the Indian subcontinent. Graham Schweig, a professor of religion at Christopher Newport University, surveys the rich heritage of influences, practices, and philosophies that have shaped India’s spiritual history.

Event date
Saturday, June 15, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

Art historian Janetta Rebold Benton surveys some of the most beautiful estates and lushest gardens of the Ile-de-France region—a favorite location for those aristocratic getaways—and the 19th-century artists who later found their own inspiration in its forests and towns. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Event date
Saturday, June 15, 2019 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II forged much more than a songwriting partnership; they created one of the most profitable and powerful entertainment businesses of their era. Todd Purdum, culture and politics writer for The Atlantic, examines how the innovative musicals of these cultural powerhouses came to define postwar America on stage, screen, television, and radio.

Event date
Saturday, June 22, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.