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Smithsonian Associates - Entertaining, Informative, Eclectic, Insightful

Seminars

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, October 30, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Although less famous than their Tudor cousins, the Scottish Stuarts ruled over a period of growth and chaos that changed England and Scotland forever. Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger looks at the eventful hundred years of the Stuart reign.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, October 30, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. ET

Civilizations have risen and fallen for centuries on the banks of the Mekong River. Long before there was Phnom Penh, Hanoi, or Vientiane, there were the settlements in the areas now known as Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, and Thailand. Art historian Robert DeCaroli investigates the cultures that emerged along this massive 2,700-mile-long river. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, November 6, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Ireland and Britain share a troubled past. Historian Jennifer Paxton untangles the complicated threads in the story of the Irish and British peoples and analyzes how a heritage of conflict is being transformed by new opportunities and new challenges.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, November 13, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

For nearly two millennia, Augustine’s arguments, insights, and ideas on faith have profoundly shaped the Western intellectual tradition. Augustine scholar Scott MacDonald explores some of those enduringly compelling ideas.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, November 13, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Understanding Italian architecture is understanding Western Civilization. No country has produced such an extraordinary number of iconic architectural monuments. Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in the Early Renaissance, traces the evolution of Italian architecture from its ancient Roman origins through the Middle Ages, and concludes with the breathtaking theatrics of Baroque architecture. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, December 3, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

Post-impressionism was less a negative reaction to impressionism than a desire to improve upon it. Art historian Janetta Rebold Benton presents an intimate look at the background, life, and art of four post-impressionist luminaries. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, December 4, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The Arts and Crafts Movement was a dominant influence in visual and decorative arts and architecture in England and the United States around the turn of the last century. Art historian Bonita Billman explores the flowering and legacy of this movement. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, January 8, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

How do we unlock the mysteries of a great poem? Discover the fascinating world of poetic form and gain a better understanding of the internal mechanisms and strategies that poets employ in their art.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, January 22, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Humans are obviously part of the animal kingdom in many important ways, and yet they exhibit features and activities that set them apart from other species. Philosophy professor Michael Gorman leads a fascinating exploration into the nature of what makes us uniquely human, touching on topics including consciousness, free will, morality, and the duality of body and soul.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, January 29, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Historian Alexander Mikaberidze examines four historical moments crucial in the emergence of France, a country with a uniquely lengthy, dramatic, and varied history. Accept his virtual invitation to the coronation of the greatest of medieval European rulers, to fight alongside King Philippe Auguste as he confronted an English-led coalition of monarchs, to look behind the intrigues at the French royal court, and to follow Parisians as they stormed the parapets of the Bastille.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, February 5, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The English painters, poets, and critics who gave birth to the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in 1848 wanted to reform art by rejecting what they called the melodramatic style of High Renaissance artists like Raphael. Art historian Bonita Billman traces this fascinating movement from its origins to flowering conclusion. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, February 26, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Biblical scholar and historian Gary Rendsburg presents a fascinating survey of aspects of the Jewish diaspora from the ancient and medieval periods, tracing the histories of communities in Egypt, Babylonia, Russia, Arabia, Italy, and Spain.