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All upcoming Philosophy & Religion programs

All upcoming Philosophy & Religion programs

Showing programs 1 to 10 of 20
Session 1 of 4
February 22, 2024

Anatolia’s colorful history has left a windfall of riches—ancient ruins, ornate Byzantine churches, supremely elegant mosques, and splendid Ottoman palaces. In an illustrated series, Serif Yenen, a Turkish-born tour guide and author, highlights the heritage and splendor of ancient Türkiye through an examination of some of its cultural gems.


February 26, 2024

As a framework for negotiations between Israel and Palestine, the 1993 Oslo Accords were intended to last five years. But grim conflicts have persisted for more than three decades, with genuine peace remaining elusive. Historian Ralph Nurnberger unravels the intricate web of secret diplomacy, alternating periods of hope and despair, and the conflicting goals and objectives among supporters and opponents of the Oslo Peace Process.


Session 2 of 4
February 29, 2024

Anatolia’s colorful history has left a windfall of riches—ancient ruins, ornate Byzantine churches, supremely elegant mosques, and splendid Ottoman palaces. In an illustrated series, Serif Yenen, a Turkish-born tour guide and author, highlights the heritage and splendor of ancient Türkiye through an examination of some of its cultural gems.


Session 3 of 4
March 7, 2024

Anatolia’s colorful history has left a windfall of riches—ancient ruins, ornate Byzantine churches, supremely elegant mosques, and splendid Ottoman palaces. In an illustrated series, Serif Yenen, a Turkish-born tour guide and author, highlights the heritage and splendor of ancient Türkiye through an examination of some of its cultural gems.


March 13, 2024

Every election cycle, American evangelicals are heavy hitters on the demographic scene and a force to be reckoned with for journalists, pundits, politicians, and political strategists. But who exactly are they? Historian Joseph Slaughter traces the movement’s 400-year-old story, highlighting key doctrines, figures, and events that shaped and transformed what it has meant to be an evangelical in America.


Session 4 of 4
March 14, 2024

Anatolia’s colorful history has left a windfall of riches—ancient ruins, ornate Byzantine churches, supremely elegant mosques, and splendid Ottoman palaces. In an illustrated series, Serif Yenen, a Turkish-born tour guide and author, highlights the heritage and splendor of ancient Türkiye through an examination of some of its cultural gems.


March 18, 2024

From the 8th through the 19th centuries, Shinto and Buddhist traditions and institutions intermingled in Japan. Buddhism used images to spread its teachings and assimilate with local religions. This practice affected the veneration of kami (broadly defined as spirits of nature) in Shinto, which originally did not use such depictions. Art historian Yui Suzuki describes the synthesis of kami veneration and Buddhist worship. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


March 21, 2024

Why does Johann Sebastian Bach’s music remain deeply relevant to our times despite having been composed 300 years ago? Because it draws on all shades of timeless human emotions. The composer’s religious cantatas—poetic and musical commentaries on sacred texts associated with specific dates on the Lutheran liturgical calendar—are vivid showcases of that complex emotional understanding. Singer Thierry van Bastelaer examines the sources of their power and their significance in Bach’s output.


March 29, 2024

Jesus Christ is an instantly recognizable figure, perhaps the most frequently depicted in all Western art. Since scripture does not provide a description of what Christ looked like, painters and mosaic-makers would often resort to the artistic canons of their time to create an image of the Nazarene. Renaissance art historian Elaine Ruffolo delves into some of the most impactful portrayals of Christ, uncovering how social, political, and religious contexts directly shaped the iconic image we recognize today. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


April 2, 2024

More than two centuries after his birth, Ralph Waldo Emerson’s reputation as the prophet of self-reliance has obscured a complicated figure—one who spent a lifetime wrestling with injustice, philosophy, art, desire, and suffering. Emersonian lecturer, editor, and translator James Marcus pieces together a new portrait of Emerson’s life that reveals an eerily modern persona of rebel, lover, friend, husband, and father.