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All upcoming Streaming programs

Your newest link to our world of learning

Welcome to Smithsonian Associates Streaming, a new digital platform for the high-quality, engaging and varied programs that you’ve come to expect from us.

We invite you to join us from the comfort of your home as we present individual programs, multi-part courses, studio arts classes, and virtual study tours inspired by the Smithsonian’s research, collections and exhibitions. We’re excited to present this new aspect of our 55 years as the world’s largest museum-based educational program—and to have you be an important part of our future growth.

Explore all our offerings in this month's digital program guide.

All upcoming Streaming programs

Showing programs 1 to 10 of 279
June 14, 2024

Though best known for his psychologically revealing self-portraits, Rembrandt was also an unrivaled master of light and shadow and expressive, luxuriant brushwork, qualities that would be emulated by generations of later artists. Art historian Aneta Georgievska-Shine explores the most distinctive aspects of Rembrandt’s artistic language through an analysis of some of his greatest masterpieces—from public commissions to his representations of stories from classical and biblical history to his most private of works. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)


June 15, 2024

Vincent van Gogh spent 1886 to 1888 living in Paris with his brother Theo. Drawn into a social and artistic circle of like-minded rising painters that he called the Painters of the Petit Boulevard, van Gogh’s immersion in the world of the avant-garde helped him define his own style and technique. Art historian Bonita Billman explores why these years in Paris were among the most influential in van Gogh’s brief life. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)


June 15, 2024

What did women do to shape England’s culture and traditions in nine centuries of turmoil, plague, famine, religious reform, and the rise of empire and industry? Author Philippa Gregory shares stores of the female soldiers, highwaywomen, pirates, miners, ship owners, runaway enslaved women, “female husbands,” social campaigners, and rebels who shaped a nation—as well as the prejudice they faced and how they built a society as diverse and varied as the women themselves.


June 17, 2024

Join curator Elizabeth Lay Little for an image-rich late spring lunchtime series focusing on decorative arts and design topics. This session explores how Coco Chanel’s Riviera vacation home mirrored its owner, a designer who was equal parts modern, simple, and complex with design historian Jean Marie Layton. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


June 17, 2024

Whether their fortunes were old or new, members of Gilded Age society reveled in hosting and attending teas, cotillions, lawn parties, luncheons, and formal dinners—all of which had their own codes of dress and manners. Even picnics were served on fine china. Food historian Francine Segan highlights the variety of foods, elaborate etiquette, and entertainments enjoyed by the period’s upper crust.


June 17, 2024

Few stories capture the imagination like “Beauty and the Beast,” the romantic tale of a beautiful girl who sees past appearances to fall in love with a hideous monster. Folklorists Sara Cleto and Brittany Warman discuss what the tale looks like around the world and what kinds of reactionary, rebellious, and revolutionary points it has allowed tellers to make. They also explain why so many people count it as their favorite fairy tale.


Session 4 of 5
June 18, 2024

Stravinsky’s spectacular early ballet scores such as Le Sacre du Printemps can distract us from where this prolific artist went next. Classical music and opera expert Saul Lilienstein examines a selection of classically inspired masterworks spanning 1918 through 1951—from L’Histoire du Soldat to The Rake’s Progress. Film excerpts of Stravinsky in conversation with other artists enhance the portrait of the man and the conductor.


June 18, 2024

A fiddler on the roof. Sounds crazy, no? Yet this story about a poor Jewish milkman, his wife, and five daughters who live in a tiny village in a corner of Eastern Europe captivated the entire world. Cultural historian Sara Lukinson traces the show’s improbable beginnings in Yiddish short stories and its creation by Broadway talents who produced a miracle of a musical filled with love, tears, and laughter.


June 18, 2024

Discover how small observations led to big breakthroughs on deciphering honey bee behavior. Cornell University biology professor Thomas D. Seeley discusses how he and his colleagues solved long-standing mysteries of honey bee nature. He tells how worker bees function as scouts to choose a home site for their colony, furnish their home with beeswax combs, and stock it with brood and food while keeping tens of thousands of colony inhabitants warm and defended from intruders.


June 18, 2024

Since the late 1940s, California has been an epicenter for some of the most striking and innovative modern domestic architecture in the world. Whether built for the families of industrial workers and returning GIs or Hollywood stars seeking a Modernist getaway in Palm Springs, they represent some of the most iconic and significant examples of Mid-Century Modern houses. Bill Keene, a lecturer on architecture and urban studies, surveys the state’s bold postwar landscape of housing design, materials, and construction. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)