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Smithsonian Associates - Entertaining, Informative, Eclectic, Insightful

Streaming Programs

Your newest link to our world of learning

Welcome to Smithsonian Associates Streaming, a new digital platform for the high-quality, engaging and varied programs that you’ve come to expect from us.

We invite you to join us from the comfort of your home as we present individual programs, multi-part courses, studio arts classes, and virtual study tours inspired by the Smithsonian’s research, collections and exhibitions. We’re excited to present this new aspect of our 55 years as the world’s largest museum-based educational program—and to have you be an important part of our future growth.

Explore all our offerings in this month's digital program guide.

Tour
Saturday, January 16, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. ET

The ancient mountains of Shenandoah National Park harbor many secrets, encompassing geology, diverse native forests, wildlife, and a rich human history. Naturalist Keith Tomlinson covers its geological origins to present-day conservation efforts, providing an intimate appreciation for its unique natural history.

Course
Sunday, January 17, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. ET

Whether it’s Beethoven, Mozart, Rachmaninoff, Richard Strauss, Puccini, or Bach, opuses of almost every famous composer have added emotional depth to hundreds of films ever since talkies emerged. In this series, concert pianist and movie fanatic Rachel Franklin delves into the magic of some of the greatest film music ever composed (even when it was unintentional). This session discusses Beethoven's music in film.

Tour
Sunday, January 17, 2021 - 4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. ET

In the early decades of the 20th century, Sears Roebuck & Co. sold more than 70,000 prefabricated Modern Homes kits, offering Americans of moderate means the chance to own an up-to-date house. Historian Dakota Springston draws on period and contemporary images to lead a virtual tour through several historic Northern Virginia neighborhoods that boast a wide range of these distinctive houses, followed by a Q&A with a Sears Homes expert.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, January 18, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. ET

On Martin Luther King Jr. Day, join Emmy Award–winning director Sam Pollard as he discusses his new documentary MKL/FBI with Chris Wilson, curator of the Smithsonian’s History Film Forum, and Larry Rubin, a former field secretary of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. The film tells the tragic story of the FBI’s surveillance and harassment of King and explores the government’s history of targeting Black activists.

Course
Tuesday, January 19, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for a series of workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on poetry.

Studio Arts
Tuesday, January 19 to March 9, 2021 – 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Experiment with a variety of painting styles such as cubism, suprematism, and abstract expressionism to learn practical applications of the concepts and techniques of modernism. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts
Tuesday, January 19 to February 16, 2021 – 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

This class introduces students to the materials and techniques of one-color relief printmaking, from design and carving of the block, through inking, printing, and presentation of the finished linocut.

Studio Arts
Tuesday, January 19 to March 9, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Popular theory on right side brain activity holds that the right brain is primarily responsible for the intuitive understanding of visual and spatial relationships. Designed to improve the way people see and record objects on paper, this class provides a set of visual exercises to help build the ability to draw.

Studio Arts
Tuesday, January 19 to February 23, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Develop skills in a range of weaving techniques as you design and create a one-of-a kind miniature tapestry on a small-frame loom.

Studio Arts
Tuesday, January 19 to February 9, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Designed for beginners who want to learn how to use their digital or mirrorless camera as a creative tool, students will gain skill in technical aspects of photography so that they can concentrate on composing beautiful images.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, January 19, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

In a conversation with journalist Ken Walsh, actor Martin Sheen discusses his iconic role in The West Wing, as well as its impact on television’s depiction of government and how we view our real-life national leaders.

Studio Arts
Wednesday, January 20 to February 24, 2021 – 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

In this class open to all levels, students discover the versatility and fluidity of working in watercolors while exploring the functional and aesthetic elements of color and design found in plants.

Studio Arts
Wednesday, January 20 to February 24, 2021 – 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. ET

Build on your botanical painting skills in this next-level class as you create vibrant watercolors inspired by nature. Learn to focus on the texture and detail of botanical subjects including flowers, fruits, and vegetables.

Studio Arts
Wednesday, January 20, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

You’ve got a great portfolio of photos. What’s next? This valuable session covers how to prepare your images to exhibit or sell, get them seen by the public, and effectively market your work.

Studio Arts
Wednesday, January 20 to March 3, 2021 – 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

This introductory course teaches the basic skills needed for drawing. Working with a variety of materials and techniques, including charcoal and pencils, students explore the rendering of geometric forms, volume, and perspective, with an emphasis on personal gesture marks.

Tour
Thursday, January 21, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. ET

Drawing on the riches of one of the greatest post-impressionist and early modern art collections in the world and remarkable high-definition Deep Zoom technology, Barnes Foundation educator Penny Hansen guides a series of live virtual tours that closely examine the paintings and lives of five artists who helped shape a truly revolutionary period in the history of art. This program focuses on art by Amedeo Modigliani and Chaim Soutine. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, January 21, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

The inexplicable force of nature that was Wolfgang Mozart seemed to live onstage and off simultaneously, a character in life’s tragicomedy but also outside of it, watching, studying, and gathering material for the fabric of his art. Biographer Jan Swafford examines how those dual lives converged in the creation of works that shaped classical music for all time.

Studio Arts
Thursday, January 21 to February 25, 2021 – 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Explore the basis of abstraction by studying color, line, and shape as they relate to composition. Learn to create exciting and innovative works of art, using a series of drawing and painting exercises designed to examine non-traditional ways of handling traditional materials and subject matter.

Studio Arts
Thursday, January 21 to February 4, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

In this class, learn to create your own hand-crafted jewelry. This experience is perfect for the student new to jewelry making, or those with experience who want to refresh their skills.

Studio Arts
Thursday, January 21, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

You don’t necessarily need great light to make a great photo. Understand the essentials of night photography and tripods as you learn to manage longer exposure times and exposure modes and compensation, choose the right tripod, work with remote shutter-release triggers, use your camera’s self-timer, and more.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, January 21, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Rita Colwell, a pioneering microbiologist and the first woman to lead the National Science Foundation, has long known that her profession is not always welcoming to women. Yet she and others excelled despite the obstacles they faced. Colwell examines how women successfully pushed back against the status quo—and what science gained in the process.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, January 21, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

A new year is a chance to begin again. Learn strategies from Karen Mangia, TEDx presenter and best-selling author, designed to help move you from intentions to actions, acceptance to acceleration, and resolutions to results. This just might be your year to succeed!

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, January 22, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Draped on three hills, Siena is the most beautiful city in Tuscany, a flamboyant medieval ensemble of palaces and towers cast in warm brown brick. From her home in Italy, art historian Elaine Ruffolo examines how art went hand in hand with fierce civic pride to make Siena a world of its own. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts
Friday, January 22 and 29, 2021 – 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Showcase your writing or art in a book as unique as you are. Book artist Sushmita Mazumdar guides students as they work with a variety of traditional and nontraditional materials to craft one-of-a kind storybooks.

Studio Arts
Saturday, January 23 and 30, 2021 – 9:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Get the most out of your digital mirrorless or SLR camera by taking part in this workshop, which provides a solid introduction to these cameras’ features and potential.

Studio Arts
Saturday, January 23, 2021 – 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Using direct printing and water-based printing inks, create realistic looking schools of fish or a single artistic print simply by inking a whole fish and pressing it to paper.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, January 23, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET

If you’ve dreamed of glancing across a dry African savannah or standing beneath a jungle canopy, hoping to get a fleeting glimpse of a wild creature you’ve only seen in a zoo, follow veteran wilderness guide and wildlife photographer Russell Gammon on a virtual safari to his favorite wild places.

Studio Arts
Saturday, January 23 to February 13, 2021 – 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

Learn the basics of hand-stitched quilt-making—including piecing, applique, and finishing techniques—as you work on a small-scale piece that can be used as a doll quilt or a wall hanging.

Studio Arts
Saturday, January 23 to February 13, 2021 – 1:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Combine painting techniques with collage to produce pieces with texture and depth. Students work on watercolor paper and canvas as they learn how to use papers, acrylics, inks, and other materials.

Studio Arts
Sunday, January 24, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

If you’ve taken the studio arts class, Gyotaku: The Japanese Art of Fish Printing, you are ready to try Hawaiian-style gyotaku. It includes printing in colorful inks and thin acrylics and adding color and texture with watercolor crayons and acrylic media.  

Studio Arts
Sunday, January 24 to March 14, 2021 - 10:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. ET

Beginning students as well as experienced painters explore watercolor techniques and learn new approaches to painting through demonstration, discussion, and experimentation.

Course
Sunday, January 24, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. ET

Whether it’s Beethoven, Mozart, Rachmaninoff, Richard Strauss, Puccini, or Bach, opuses of almost every famous composer have added emotional depth to hundreds of films ever since talkies emerged. In this series, concert pianist and movie fanatic Rachel Franklin delves into the magic of some of the greatest film music ever composed (even when it was unintentional). This session discusses 20th-century composers and film.

Studio Arts
Monday, January 25 to February 8, 2021 – 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Boost your creativity and record your thoughts and visual observations of the world around you—and in the process transform your sketchbook into a powerful expression of your inner self.

Studio Arts
Monday, January 25, 2021 – 4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. ET and Monday, February 22, 2021 – 4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. ET

Sarinda Jones, a kiln-formed glass artist and alumna of the internationally renowned Pilchuck Glass School, guides you in creating a colorful fused-glass plate just in time for holiday table settings, gift giving, or everyday use.

Studio Arts
Monday, January 25 to March 22, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET (no class Feb. 15)

This introductory course teaches the basic skills needed for drawing. Working with a variety of materials and techniques, including charcoal and pencils, students explore the rendering of geometric forms, volume, and perspective, with an emphasis on personal gesture marks.

Studio Arts
Monday, January 25 to March 8, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET (no class Feb. 15)

If you’ve ever wanted to paint, here’s a class that offers the perfect introduction to the art—and will have you ready to pick up your brush with confidence.

Course
Tuesday, January 26, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for a series of workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on perspective.

Studio Arts
Tuesday, January 26 to March 16, 2021 – 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Whether you want to work in digital or film, this course offers a solid foundation for new photographers ready to learn the basics.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, January 26, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Historian Allen Pietrobon explores how and why the unique form of suburban living first arose in America, the legacies of the suburbs, and how they shaped our  politics, culture, race relations, and gender dynamics.

Studio Arts
Wednesday, January 27, 2021 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Are you in a rut? Has the excitement gone out of your artistic life? Would you like to think more creatively? Get your creative juices flowing again with the help of everyday materials and easy ideas.

Studio Arts
Wednesday, January 27 to February 17, 2021 – 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

Explore a liberating style of abstract embroidery using an array of improvisational stitches on found fabric, specifically scraps of vintage kimono silk. Learn some of the principles of abstract art making, developing a language of marks through different stitches, and discuss color palettes, as well as how to edit what doesn't work in your composition.

Studio Arts
Wednesday, January 27 to March 17, 2021 – 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Whether you work digitally or on film, this course is ideal for students who are familiar with their cameras but are interested in expanding their understanding of photography fundamentals.

Studio Arts
Wednesday, January 27 to February 17, 2021 – 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Center yourself through the calm flow of the rhythmic motion of stitching as you create a therapeutic textile panel using a hand needle and materials you have at home.

Tour
Wednesday, January 27, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

You’d likely be surprised that the nation’s capital is home to several significant sites connected to the beginnings of the airplane. Join Wright scholar Paul Glenshaw for an interactive virtual tour that visits locations across the Washington area to discover a story of large and small moments that helped launch flight as we know it today.

Studio Arts
Wednesday, January 27 to March 17, 2021 – 1:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Learn to sketch animals and objects found in nature, then combine your drawings with painting and additional elements and textures to create whimsical or serious mixed media art.

Studio Arts
Wednesday, January 27 to March 17, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Students are introduced to the materials, tools, and technologies used in collage and assemblage. They find inspiration in artists who worked in collage including Joseph Cornell, Romare Bearden, and Gertrude Green.

Studio Arts
Wednesday, January 27 to March 17, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Whether you work digitally or on film, this course is ideal for students who are familiar with their cameras but are interested in expanding their understanding of photography fundamentals.

Studio Arts
Wednesday, January 27 to February 24, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

This intermediate-level photography course offers a better understanding of compositional elements and practices—such as simplicity, balance, and natural lighting—that promote taking better and more unique photographs.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, January 27, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Mel Brooks, Johnny Carson, and Carol Burnett—all recipients of the Kennedy Center Honors—made it look easy, but nothing is harder than comedy that seems effortless. Join Sara Lukinson, filmmaker and writer for the annual event for 38 years, for an evening full of laughs as she covers the remarkable lives of these legendary entertainers and screens clips of their hilarious performances.

Studio Arts
Thursday, January 28, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Tangled up in a knitting problem? From dropped stitches to difficult pattern instructions to twisted stitches and more, learn a protocol to follow when you’re stuck on a project.

Studio Arts
Thursday, January 28 to February 25, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Take your skills beyond auto mode as you explore a myriad of your digital camera’s exposure options and features in this course designed for intermediate photographers.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, January 28, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Iran and America’s current fraught relationship has its roots in one that was long grounded in friendship and opportunity. Historian John Ghazvinian draws on his new book, America and Iran: A History, 1720 to the Present, to trace how and why the link between these former allies eroded and offers a glimpse of what lies in store for both nations.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, January 29, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

According to religious scholar Karen Armstrong, the misunderstanding of scripture is perhaps the root cause of many of today’s controversies. She shines fresh light on the world’s major religions to examine how a creative and spiritual engagement with holy texts can build bridges between faiths.

Course
Friday, January 29, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay for an image-rich lunchtime lecture series focusing on fascinating decorative arts and design topics. In this session, she explores the genius of 20th century industrial designers.

Studio Arts
Friday, January 29, 2021 – 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Learn the basic Palestinian cross-stitch and how to create a tatreez sampler, using a standard size sheet of Aida cloth fabric and one that can incorporate numerous patterns and eventually become a wall-hanging. This workshop’s motif focus is the road of stars, originating from the Yaffa Region.

Studio Arts
Sunday, January 31 to March 21, 2021 – 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

The beautiful decorations of religious and secular manuscripts are centuries-old Islamic traditions. Guided by a graduate of the Turquoise Mountain Institute, explore the elements of gold-leaf manuscript illumination in the Afghan tradition.

Course
Sunday, January 31, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. ET

Whether it’s Beethoven, Mozart, Rachmaninoff, Richard Strauss, Puccini, or Bach, opuses of almost every famous composer have added emotional depth to hundreds of films ever since talkies emerged. In this series, concert pianist and movie fanatic Rachel Franklin delves into the magic of some of the greatest film music ever composed (even when it was unintentional). This session discusses varied use of concert masterpieces in film genres.

Studio Arts
Monday, February 1 and 8, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Spend two sessions investigating new techniques as you have fun creating papers for collage and other art projects. Take home a glorious collection of one-of-a-kind papers accented by acrylic, inks, stamps, and other printmaking materials.

Course
Tuesday, February 2, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for a series of workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on impact.

Studio Arts
Tuesday, February 2 to March 9, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Find inspiration in both the ancient art of mosaics and the form’s international movement. Sessions guide students of all skill levels through the process of creating a mixed-media abstract mosaic. They also have the opportunity to experiment with several new mosaic fabrication techniques.

Course
Wednesday, February 3, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Some moments in movies never leave us: a snappy line of dialogue, a dance in the rain or by the Seine, a timeless love song, a great last line. Documentary filmmaker and writer Sara Lukinson revisits some of our favorite movies, setting them against the backdrop of their times, the people who dreamed them up, and the America they reflected—or asked us to imagine. This session focuses on Some Like It Hot and Tootsie.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, February 3, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

From the early 15th century, the story of the Jewish population of Florence has encompassed vast wealth and prestige—and almost continual trial and tribulation. Art historian and Florentine tour guide Laura Greenblatt explores the history of their presence in the city over the course of six centuries.

Studio Arts
Thursday, February 4 to March 25, 2021 – 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

In this course, gain the technical background and experience you need to get started as a painter. Working from still-life arrangements, explore basic painting techniques, including color-mixing, scumbling, and glazing.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 4, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

The American victory over British forces at Saratoga in September 1777 stunned the world and changed the course of the War of Independence. Kevin J. Weddle of the U.S. Army War College analyzes the strategic underpinnings of the historic Saratoga campaign, considers why events unfolded as they did, and offers a new interpretation of George Washington’s role in the American success.

Studio Arts
Friday, February 5 to 19, 2021 – 12:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. ET

This class focuses on the skills you need to make mittens and gloves. Knitters learn knitting in the round; increases; using markers, such as holders and counters; and how to knit thumbs and fingers.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, February 5, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Florence is replete with frescoes, paintings, sculpture, and architecture created in an era in which art was the cornerstone of cultural activity. From her home in Tuscany, art historian Elaine Ruffolo traces the history of this jewel of a city from the dawn of the Renaissance to the era of the Medici dukes. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts
Friday, February 5 to 19, 2021 – 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Explore the materials, tools, and techniques used in collage and assemblage as you create an artwork that’s uniquely yours. The workshop, ideal for both nonartists and those with experience, is a great way to spark your creativity in two forms that offer wide possibilities for inventive expression.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, February 5, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. ET

In an immersive tasting experience led by sommelier Erik Segelbaum, learn about the best of Northern California wines from Napa, Sonoma, Lake, and Mendocino counties, as well as hidden gems from some outlying appellations.

Course
Saturday, February 6 to 27, 2021 - 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. ET

From the Revolution to the Civil War to the postwar boom and the tech boom, Arlington County has always been a canvas for American history. Historian Kathryn Springston follows its story through four centuries of social and economic change.

Studio Arts
Saturday, February 6, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Everyone appreciates receiving a card in the mail. When it is a bespoke card just for them, the impact is greater. In this workshop, create cards that celebrate joyful events in life, like a birthday, or share a message of comfort and solace in the event of sickness or loss. 

Studio Arts
Saturday, February 6, 2021 – 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

Learn the techniques needed to create unique fine mosaic jewelry as you create beautiful silver-plate mosaic pendants using a wide variety of materials.

Course
Monday, February 8, February 22, March 1, and March 8, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Spanning more than 1400 years, three continents, and a geography that encompasses a great diversity of peoples, languages, and ethnicities, Islamic art and civilization forms one of the great contributions to humanity. Art historian Ann Birkelbach surveys its wide-ranging heritage, from calligraphy to architecture, painting to magnificent crafts. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, February 8, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Victor Weedn, a leading expert on forensic science, offers a comprehensive introduction to the fascinating history of forensic science and its basic methods, current controversies, and future.

Course
Monday, February 8, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Washington, D.C., has given much to the musical world beyond its best-known exports Duke Ellington and the punk and go-go scenes. In a 3-session series, join musician, broadcaster, and historian Ken Avis as he explores the area’s lesser-known, remarkable, and fascinating musical avenues across the decades and why they could only have developed here. This session focuses on D.C.'s jazz legacy.

Tour
Tuesday, February 9, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. ET

Photographer Bruce White has spent much time in and around the White House, shooting it for books published by the White House Historical Association. As the author of At Home in the President’s Neighborhood, he’s the perfect guide for a vitual tour of the area most closely connected with the residents of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, Lafayette Park.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, February 9, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Pizza is central to so many cultural touch points: from movies, to books, to television and even sports. Celebrate National Pizza Day (Feb. 9) with pizza experts Thom and James Elliot—and learn how the savory pie became one of the world’s favorite foods.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, February 10, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

“Leave the gun, take the cannoli.” Food plays a key featured role in Francis Ford Coppola’s first entry in The Godfather trilogy. Italian-born Ermelinda M. Campani, examines the 1972 film’s intertwined perspectives on food and family, which encompass ethnic identity, personal honor, violence, and power.

Studio Arts
Wednesday, February 10 to 24, 2021 – 1:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

Get the most out of your digital mirrorless or SLR camera by taking part in this workshop, which provides a solid introduction to these cameras’ features and potential.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, February 10, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

Join Oscar-winning actor Matthew McConaughey for a sure-to-be-memorable interview with Gayle King as he shares unvarnished stories from his memoir Greenlights and explains how they instilled in him the importance of values, the power of new experiences, and, as he puts it, “either changing your reality or changing how you see it.”

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, February 10, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Monstrous black holes lurk in the centers of almost every large galaxy in the universe. Get insights into several significant recent events in black-hole astrophysics and experience a virtual night-sky viewing with experts from George Mason University.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 11, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Great art is timeless. Paul Glenshaw explores the political backdrop of the most iconic symbol of the French Republic, the life of its creator who embodies French Romantic painting, and how they came together in a single image. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Tour
Thursday, February 11, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

Sherri Wheeler, the Smithsonian’s director of visitors services, is ready to give you a lively introduction to its 19 museums and galleries, 9 research centers, and one beloved zoo—a whirlwind virtual tour that covers destinations from D.C. to New York City, Massachusetts to Florida, and even Panama.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 11, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Oxford and its storied history have inspired a startling catalog of eccentric sleuths and outré crimes. Settle in with a spot of tea for an evening of shuttered rooms, cryptic clues, and dodgy detectives as you follow a virtual tour of the city and its byways, where danger lurks! 

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 11, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Guided by floral designer Sarah von Pollaro, modern-day romantics create a one-of-a-kind arrangement to gift to a loved one (or keep for themselves), and pick up great tips about buying and keeping flowers fresh.  

Course
Friday, February 12, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay for an image-rich lunchtime lecture series focusing on fascinating decorative arts and design topics. In this session, she explores how the indomitable women of the first generation of fashion influencers helped define the idea of style for the nation.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, February 13, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Art historian Bonita Billman explores the sinuous, and seductive art nouveau movement in modern art and design—called the New Style—which developed in France out of the arts and crafts and aesthetic movements at the very turn of the last century. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Studio Arts
Sunday, February 14 to March 21, 2021 – 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

For centuries, religious and secular Islamic manuscripts have contained beautiful geometric decorations. Explore the history and construction of these traditional designs with Sughra Hussainy, a graduate of Turquoise Mountain Institute in Kabul, Afghanistan. Then, create designs with graph paper and a compass.

Course
Tuesday, February 16, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Each of the more than 1,100 UNESCO World Heritage Sites offers a fascinating glimpse into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. Some, however, are more iconic than others. Historian Justin M. Jacobs offers an in-depth overview of four of the most significant ancient sites in Egypt, Persia, Greece, and Mesoamerica. This session focuses on Ancient Thebes.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, February 16, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

The Second World War remains the greatest catastrophe in human history, with more than 70 million deaths, most of them civilians. Historian Christopher Hamner explores the roots of the war in Europe against Adolf Hitler’s Nazi Germany.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, February 17, 2021 - 6:45 p.m ET

Explore the dramatic forces that have shaped the Icelandic landscape over 30 million years with geologist Tamie J. Jovanelly in a virtual tour that captures the island’s natural beauty and the relationships among structure, process, and time that influenced the island’s geologic evolution.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, February 17, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Despite America's newly won independence, a bitter dispute over whether to have a capital and where to locate it almost tore the young nation apart. It is a little-known tale of founding-period intrigue and an underappreciated side of Washington's exceptional political skill and leadership. Historian Robert P. Watson, examines the key role George Washington played in settling this question, the forces that influenced Washington's passion and vision for the capital city, and the intense political struggle to build it

Studio Arts
Thursday, February 18 to March 25, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Explore the spectrum of floral design. Sourcing (with a focus on sustainability), making the most of seasonal flowers, creating centerpieces, wiring techniques, bouquet-making, and photographing your work are all among the practical areas covered.

Studio Arts
Thursday, February 18, 2021 – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Ready to experiment with some novel watercolor techniques? Try your hand at using some fascinating twists to add intriguing textures and nuances to your paintings.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 18, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

The walls of Blenheim, a 19th-century brick farmhouse in Fairfax, Virginia, are a fascinating treasure trove: Their plaster is covered with a collection of Civil War soldiers’ names, regiments, hometowns, dates, personal messages, and graffiti. See how advanced digital imaging technology is revealing new layers of the history of the war and an ordinary Virginia house that played a part in it.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 18, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

In an entertaining and provocative discussion, best-selling author Simon Winchester discusses how we acquire land, how we steward it, how and why we fight over it, and finally, how we sometimes share it. 

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, February 19, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Live from her home in Tuscany, art historian Elaine Ruffolo follows the extraordinary career of Piero della Francesca, acknowledged as one of the foundational artists of the Renaissance. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts
Saturday, February 20 and Sunday, February 21, 2021 – 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Adobe Lightroom is the most useful (and user friendly) software for organizing and editing images, usable for both RAW and JPEG image files. This two-session workshop offers users an overview of the program, with a focus on working with the essential Library and Develop modules for organizing and editing your files.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, February 20, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

African Americans threw themselves into the cause of the American Revolution with more enthusiasm and with more at stake than did many white colonists. But after the transformative moment of victory, Black fortunes would diverge dramatically in the North and the South. Historian Richard Bell explores the revolution and its aftermath from the unfamiliar perspective of enslaved and free African Americans.

Studio Arts
Saturday, February 20 and 27, 2020 – 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET.

Leave your hesitation behind and get ready for a simplified, step-by-step method for creating watercolor portraits. Learn how to diagram a face by following simple spatial relationships; how to mix colors to achieve a range of skin tones; and how to layer watercolors to add dimension to facial features and hair.

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, February 21, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. ET

Join geologist Kirt Kempter on a geologic exploration of three iconic national parks, a fascinating journey that examines how the spectacular landscapes seen by today’s vistors in the Colorado Plateau were shaped across time.

Studio Arts
Monday, February 22 to March 22, 2021 – 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Learn both the classic materials and techniques of the woodcut, a printmaking technique almost as old as the printing press and that remains a popular medium of artistic expression.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, February 22, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Is a banana duct-taped to a wall really worth $120,000? What happens when a work of art’s aesthetic value is overshadowed by its market value? Ellen Gorman of Georgetown University offers a survey of the American art market from the 1950s to the present, introducing the cast of players and corporate entities behind the transformation of artworks into commodities for sale to the highest bidder. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Monday, February 22, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Washington, D.C., has given much to the musical world beyond its best-known exports Duke Ellington and the punk and go-go scenes. In a 3-session series, join musician, broadcaster, and historian Ken Avis as he explores the area’s lesser-known, remarkable, and fascinating musical avenues across the decades and why they could only have developed here. This session focuses on D.C.'s country music past.

Course
Tuesday, February 23 to March 16, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

With the works of Tchaikovsky, Mussorgsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Rachmaninoff, Prokofiev, and other 19th- and 20th-century composers, Russia has provided some of the most exciting and original music in the repertoire today. In a two-part series, concert pianist Rachel Franklin combines lectures and piano demonstrations to trace the turbulent historical movements that acted both as backdrop and engine for a nation’s fascinating musical evolution. Note: This is Part I of a two-part course.

Studio Arts
Tuesday, February 23 to March 16, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Lighting can make or break your work as a digital photographer. Learn the tech tips that will make your flash one of your most effective creative tools.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, February 23, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

The United States didn’t invent cinema, but over the last century it became an American institution. Using clips from movies ranging from Stagecoach to The Dark Knight, film critic Noah Gittell considers a trio of American archetypes that emerged at key points in Hollywood history: the Cowboy, the Rogue Cop, and the Orphan Protector.

Course
Tuesday, February 23, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Each of the more than 1,100 UNESCO World Heritage Sites offers a fascinating glimpse into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. Some, however, are more iconic than others. Historian Justin M. Jacobs offers an in-depth overview of four of the most significant ancient sites in Egypt, Persia, Greece, and Mesoamerica. This session focuses on Ancient Persepolis.

Studio Arts
Wednesday, February 24 to March 24, 2021 – 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Discover the illustrative potential of fiber art as you create a one-of-a-kind art book to document and preserve moments from your creative journey. Explore basic design principles with fabric, including the relationship of figure and ground, symmetry and asymmetry, and how to create perspective using color and line. Fusing, hand-stitching and embellishing techniques are also explored.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, February 24, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

The Russian immigrant originally named Israel Baline translated the spirit of his new country into enduringly popular music. American musical specialist Robert Wyatt covers Irving Berlin’s extraordinary life, spanning a half-century of achievement that produced songs for Tin Pan Alley, Broadway, radio, television, film, and a worldwide military audience.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, February 24, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

The world held its breath, then rejoiced when the National Zoo’s giant panda, Mei Xiang, 22, gave birth to a healthy male cub in August. SCBI staff scientist Pierre Comizzoli, who oversaw the artificial insemination process, and Laurie Thompson, assistant curator for giant pandas at the Zoo, discuss the panda’s birth and provide an update on his growth and development.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 25, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Art historian Bonita Billman analyzes artist Edgar Degas’s contributions to French impressionist art and posterity, and looks at his role as an art collector of merit. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts
Thursday, February 25 and March 4, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Discover how to easily capture a variety of subjects with loose lines and painterly colors using instructor Cindy Briggs’ quick-sketch watercolors method. This go-with-the-flow technique is perfect for studies, travel journals, and finished fine art.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 25, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Frederick Douglass was a prophet who could see a better future that lay just beyond reach. Yet his life bursts with contradiction and change. Historian Richard Bell examines this many-sided figure’s life to reveal more than another great man on a pedestal.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 25, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Why do people living in some areas of the world, called Blue Zones, live longer than the average person? Find out from John Whyte, WebMD’s chief medical officer who shares practical tips for longer lives—in your zone and beyond.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 25, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

As NASA’s Mars 2020 Perseverance rover heads toward a planned February 18, 2021, landing, planetary scientist Sarah Stewart Johnson recalls the decades-long search for life on Mars—and proof that we are not alone in the universe.

Tour
Friday, February 26, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Poster House in New York City is the first museum in the United States dedicated exclusively to posters. Join chief curator Angelina Lippert for a virtual look at the work of one of the most significant artists in the form, as seen in the exhibition Alphonse Mucha: Art Nouveau / Nouvelle Femme. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts
Friday, February 26 to March 12, 2021 – 12:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. ET

Peries, XOX, and Boarders. These may sound like the names of rock bands, but in fact they are the patterns found in Fair Isle knitting. Students in this workshop focus on learning this stranding color technique.

Studio Arts
Friday, February 26 to March 12, 2021 – 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Explore the creative possibilities of combining wool with other decorative elements such as metal, beads, and stones to make distinctive necklaces, rings, pendants, earrings, and other jewelry.

Studio Arts
Friday, February 26, 2021 – 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Learn the basic Palestinian cross-stitch and how to create a tatreez sampler, using a standard size sheet of Aida cloth fabric and one that can incorporate numerous patterns and eventually become a wall-hanging. This workshop’s motif focus is flowers, originating from the Remallah Region.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, February 26, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

How in the 5th century B.C. did a small town on a remote peninsula jutting into the Mediterranean create an unparalleled legacy of innovation, higher education, discovery, and invention? Historian Diane Cline examines how the social fabric of classical Athens shaped an environment in which creative people and their new ideas could thrive.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, February 26, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. ET

Legendary jazz saxophonist Charlie “Bird” Parker changed the world of music as one of the innovators of bebop. The Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra’s artistic director and conductor Charlie Young, Dwandalyn R. Reece, curator music and performing arts at the National Museum of African American History and Culture, and Bobby Watson from the American Jazz Museum celebrate Parker’s sound and examine how his brilliance and charisma had an impact on the course of music like no other.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, February 27, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The legacy of repeated historic conflicts still looms over an island still emerging from the 30 years of violence known as the Troubles. Historian Jennifer Paxton traces the turbulent and fascinating history of Ireland from the Tudor conquest and the English and Scottish settlements in Ulster to the Good Friday Agreement, Brexit, and beyond.

Studio Arts
Saturday, February 27, 2021 – 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

White-line woodcuts are multicolor images printed from a single block of wood. Learn to create your own by cutting a nature print or simple line drawing into a single wood block with a knife or gouge, creating the “white lines” when printed.

Tour
Sunday, February 28, 2021 - 4:00 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. ET

Whether they are park-like retreats, centers of research, or incorporate both, the world’s botanical gardens are museums with living collections that tell unique stories. Naturalist Keith Tomlinson surveys six of the most remarkable, covering gardens from Singapore to South Africa, Morocco to Missouri. This session focuses on Singapore's Gardens by the Bay.

Studio Arts
Monday, March 1 to 22, 2021 – 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

In an artist-led series designed to provide a tranquil mid-day break, create small but satisfying works of art as a way to hit “pause” and incorporate a bit of creativity into your at-home routines.

Course
Monday, March 1 to Friday, March 5, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

The British monarchy has outlasted most of its European counterparts, adapting to changing times and managing to maintain enough popularity to survive for more than a thousand years. Tudor scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger traces a path through the lives and times of the kings and queens who have ruled England, then Great Britain, and finally the United Kingdom to examine how the monarchy has endured from the days of King Arthur to today.

Studio Arts
Monday, March 1 to 22, 2021 – 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. ET

This course examines fundamental concepts of composition and their practical application in studio-art practice, offering participants tools to enrich their own work as well to analyze and appreciate visual art in general. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts
Monday, March 1 to 22, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Learn to identify the elements of composition, and how to apply and expand design concepts in individual pieces.

Studio Arts
Tuesday, March 2 to 23, 2021 – 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

This class introduces students to the principles of relief sculpture, which is a bridge between two-dimensional and three-dimensional art forms.

Studio Arts
Tuesday, March 2 to 23, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Gain increased confidence in your weaving skills and take your tapestry to the next level. Knowledge of basic tapestry weaving is required.

Course
Tuesday, March 2, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Each of the more than 1,100 UNESCO World Heritage Sites offers a fascinating glimpse into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. Some, however, are more iconic than others. Historian Justin M. Jacobs offers an in-depth overview of four of the most significant ancient sites in Egypt, Persia, Greece, and Mesoamerica. This session focuses on Acropolis.

Studio Arts
Wednesday, March 3 to 24, 2021 – 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Develop your technical skills in painting landscapes that vividly capture the atmosphere and elements of a scene.

Studio Arts
Wednesday, March 3 to 17, 2021 - 10:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. ET

This fully hands-on and interactive class is designed for those who have already had a structured introduction to Lightroom and are familiar with the Library and Develop modules.

Course
Wednesday, March 3, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Some moments in movies never leave us: a snappy line of dialogue, a dance in the rain or by the Seine, a timeless love song, a great last line. Documentary filmmaker and writer Sara Lukinson revisits some of our favorite movies, setting them against the backdrop of their times, the people who dreamed them up, and the America they reflected—or asked us to imagine. This session focuses on musicals in film history during the 1940s and ’50s.

Studio Arts
Wednesday, March 3 to 24, 2021 – 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. ET

Develop your technical skills in painting landscapes that vividly capture the atmosphere and elements of a scene.

Studio Arts
Wednesday, March 3, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Shooting a great photo is just the beginning. Get ready to show off your work by learning how to get your digital images printed accurately and to cut custom-sized windows in mat board. 

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, March 3, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

For many of the impressionists, women were not simply passive models but essential partners, collaborators, muses—and sometimes lovers and wives. Art historian Natasha Schlesinger looks at five fascinating women who inspired portraits created by Renoir, Monet, Degas, Manet, and Cassatt. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, March 4, 2021 - 5:00 p.m. ET

Tom Stoppard is a towering and beloved literary figure known for his dizzying narrative inventiveness and intense attention to language. Hermione Lee discusses her new biography of one of our greatest living playwrights with longtime Stoppard collaborator Carey Perloff in a fascinating examination of his work and a riveting look at the life a remarkable man.

Studio Arts
Thursday, March 4 to 25, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Learn to see like a scientist as you use watercolor and ink to illustrate specimens from nature. Experienced students develop their skills in applying key techniques such as composition, working with color, and recording fine detail in nature journaling, watercolor painting, drawing, and creating stand-alone biological illustrations.

Studio Arts
Thursday, March 4 to 18, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Show off your photos like a pro and learn how to assemble a personal portfolio that reflects your best work and your distinctive vision as a photographer.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, March 4, 2021 - 8:00 p.m. ET

The Badlands of North Dakota transformed Theodore Roosevelt over the course of more than three decades, reinventing himself into the kind of vigorous outdoorsman he’d idealized as a youth—and that shaped his public image as president and a passionate conservationist. Roosevelt scholar and historian Clay Jenkinson tells the story that brings you into the heart of TR’s beloved west and the national park that bears his name.

Course
Friday, March 5 to 26, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

In illustrated presentations, explore Yale University’s architecture, art and artifacts, books and documents, and medical and natural-history objects, focusing on outstanding examples in each category.

Studio Arts
Friday, March 5 to 26, 2021 – 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

This class provides intermediate-level sculpture students the opportunity to advance from creating simple studies to developing and executing advanced compositions.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, March 5, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. ET

World-class additions to any wine cellar, some of Washington’s most powerful and amazing wines are being brought to life by equally powerful and amazing women. In a guided tasting led by top sommelier Erik Segelbaum, discover some of the state’s best wines produced by women winemakers.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, March 6, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The famous breaking of the Mayan code in the late 20th century revolutionized the study of these peoples and of ancient America. Humanities scholar George Scheper examines how interdisciplinary study of the Maya extends beyond the traditional archaeological focus to comprise political and social history, art, comparative religion, and ecology.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, March 6, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. ET

As the 19th century drew to a close, Vienna was an incubator for some of the most important figures in the arts, letters, and philosophy. Art historian Aneta Georgievska-Shine explores the ways in which fin-de-siècle Vienna became the cradle of modernity in Central Europe.  (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Studio Arts
Saturday, March 6, 2021 – 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Forcing bulbs to bloom is a long and intense process. This winter, create a crimson amaryllis’s stamen, petals, leaves, and bulb using crepe paper. Leave the Zoom meeting ready to complete two or three realistic amaryllis plants.

Studio Arts
Saturday, March 6, 2021 – 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Join an orchid-care expert for a fun, informative afternoon about the native orchids that grow in the northeastern United States, where to find them in nature, and how to grow hardy orchids in your backyard.

Studio Arts
Sunday, March 7 and 14, 2021 – 9:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Get the most out of your digital mirrorless or SLR camera by taking part in this workshop, which provides a solid introduction to these cameras’ features and potential.

Course
Monday, March 8, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Washington, D.C., has given much to the musical world beyond its best-known exports Duke Ellington and the punk and go-go scenes. In a 3-session series, join musician, broadcaster, and historian Ken Avis as he explores the area’s lesser-known, remarkable, and fascinating musical avenues across the decades and why they could only have developed here. This session focuses on D.C.'s rock, go-go, and rhythms and blues legacy.

Course
Tuesday, March 9, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Each of the more than 1,100 UNESCO World Heritage Sites offers a fascinating glimpse into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. Some, however, are more iconic than others. Historian Justin M. Jacobs offers an in-depth overview of four of the most significant ancient sites in Egypt, Persia, Greece, and Mesoamerica. This session focuses on Teotihuacan.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, March 10, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Over more than five decades, the pioneering French modernist Henri Matisse created work in a dazzlingly wide range of materials and styles. Art historian Nancy G. Heller explores how all of Matisse’s diverse output reflects a unified aesthetic philosophy and investigates why his work continues to fascinate today’s creative minds. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts
Wednesday, March 10, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Take command of your photographic vision as you learn the basics of your camera’s exposure functions. Learn to control the properties of your images through the understanding of apertures, shutter speeds, depth of field, shutter motion effects, equivalent exposures, and exposure modes.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, March 10, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

In the 18th century, the British Royal Navy impressed, or forced, tens of thousands of seamen into a lifetime of service—a practice that drew resistance across the Empire. Historian Denver Brunsman examines the high human cost that enabled England’s maritime superiority.

Tour
Wednesday, March 10, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

A private club with a public mission to foster the arts in the nation’s capital, the Arts Club of Washington has welcomed sculptors, painters, poets, musicians, architects, writers, dancers, and arts lovers since 1916. The club’s historian Martin Murray offers an illustrated overview of the architecture and history of the elegant Federalist-era clubhouse and a lively history of how notable Arts Club members helped shape—and sometimes shake up—Washington’s cultural landscape.

Studio Arts
Thursday, March 11 to 25, 2021 – 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Learn the rules of bookmaking…then get creative and break them!  Each week, make different kinds of books, including an accordion book, Japanese stab bound journal, and a travel journal with sewn in pages.

Studio Arts
Thursday, March 11 and 18, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Learn to capture the likeness of a sunlit sculpture in watercolors. Explore how dramatic sunlight and layered shadows can give a watercolor painting a sense of dimension. This new way of seeing can be your stepping-stone to the world of watercolor portraiture.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, March 11, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

For 16th-century Dutch explorer William Barents, larger-than-life ambitions and an obsessive quest to chart a path through the deepest, most remote regions of the Arctic ended in both tragedy and glory. Drawing on her new book Icebound, journalist Andrea Pitzer shares this gripping tale of survival in a conversation with wildlife biologist and author Jonathan C. Slaght.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, March 12, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Sandro Botticelli’s art captures the shift from a mystical, symbolic medieval worldview to the more humanist ideals of the Early Renaissance. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo traces the life and times of this Florentine master from his rise as painter to the Medici bankers to his downfall as a devoted follower of fiery Savonarola. (World Art History Certificate elective, ½ credit)

Studio Arts
Friday, March 12, 2021 – 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Learn the basic Palestinian cross-stitch and how to create a tatreez sampler, using a standard size sheet of Aida cloth fabric and one that can incorporate numerous patterns and eventually become a wall-hanging. This workshop’s motif focus is carnations, originating from the Bersheba Region.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, March 13, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. ET

In the early 20th century, Albert C. Barnes drew on expert guidance and his own fortune to assemble a dazzling collection of primarily French post-impressionist works that reflect his interest in the creators of his time. Bill Perthes, director of adult education at the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, offers a comprehensive look at how a collector’s unique vision created an equally distinctive institution rooted in its founder’s belief that art has the power to improve minds and transform lives. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts
Saturday, March 13 and 20, 2021 – 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

In quilting, the traditional Log Cabin block offers a wonderful framework for exploring color and value contrast—and for spontaneous piecing. Learn this technique, then finish ten blocks into a table runner.

Tour
Sunday, March 14, 2021 - 4:00 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. ET

Whether they are park-like retreats, centers of research, or incorporate both, the world’s botanical gardens are museums with living collections that tell unique stories. Naturalist Keith Tomlinson surveys six of the most remarkable, covering gardens from Singapore to South Africa, Morocco to Missouri. This session focuses on Marrakech's Majorelle Gardens and Istanbul's Nezahat Botanical Gardens.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, March 15, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

Over the centuries, the dramatic life of Marie Antoinette has continued to fascinate. Decorative arts historian Stefanie Walker appraises Marie-Antoinette’s cultural legacy—and why the myths about her are so enduring.

Studio Arts
Tuesday, March 16 and 23, 2021 – 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Merge recent findings on visual perception with familiar elements of art to discover how your paintings can take on new and fresh creative edges.

Studio Arts
Tuesday, March 16, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. ET

Escape into the unique world of mosaics in a lively pictorial lecture that travels to Ravenna, Barcelona, Chartres, and other locations to celebrate the beauty and expressive variety of the art form.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, March 16, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

He’s the top! American music specialist Robert Wyatt leads a musical journey through Cole Porter’s dazzling career on Broadway and in Hollywood, his personal tragedies, and his legacy of some of the most deliciously witty, provocative, and elegant contributions  to the great American songbook.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, March 17, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

In the years after World War II, television blossomed as a creative medium, with live dramatic shows like “Kraft Television Theater” and “Playhouse 90” showcasing the talents of soon-to-be-famous performers, directors, and writers. But this golden age was a short one, as was New York City’s dominance as a center of production. Brian Rose, professor emeritus at Fordham University, explores the forces behind the demise.

Studio Arts
Wednesday, March 17 and 24, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Breathe new life into your unfinished or "failed" collages or paintings. Find ways to infuse interest and create a variety of compositions to change the look and feel of your pieces.

Studio Arts
Wednesday, March 17, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Though flashes can be intimidating, just a bit of knowledge can make yours an invaluable photographic tool. Understand the essential basics of TTL (through-the-lens) flash photography as you learn about modes, bounce flash, exposure compensation, and using accessories.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, March 17, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Look to the space-traveling future as Michael Summers, a professor of physics and astronomy at George Mason University, explores how the use of space resources could propel human colonization throughout the solar system in the coming decades and beyond.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, March 19, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Art historian Joseph Cassar explores the work of Marc Chagall whose oeuvre—whimsical, colorful and populated with images from the stories of his native Russian culture—is both emotionally and poetically dream-based. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, March 20, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The world was stunned when, in the spring of 1940, Germany invaded and quickly defeated France. Ronald C. Rosbottom, a scholar of French and European history, examines why knowing more about the impact of both occupation and resistance during WWII helps us understand aspects of France’s present political and diplomatic environment.

Studio Arts
Saturday, March 20 and Sunday, March 21, 2021 – 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

Put away your point-and-shoot camera. Learn to make the most of your iPhone’s camera, starting with essential photography basics and moving on to some of the best apps, camera accessories, and low-cost tools for editing and image management.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, March 22, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

Young British stockbroker Nicholas Winton's split-second decision to save as many Jewish children as possible from the Nazis remained a secret for nearly 50 years. Historian Ralph Nurnberger highlights the story of this ordinary but remarkable man who was knighted for his efforts.

Course
Tuesday, March 23 to April 13, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

With the works of Tchaikovsky, Mussorgsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Rachmaninoff, Prokofiev, and other 19th- and 20th-century composers, Russia has provided some of the most exciting and original music in the repertoire today. In a two-part series, concert pianist Rachel Franklin combines lectures and piano demonstrations to trace the turbulent historical movements that acted both as backdrop and engine for a nation’s fascinating musical evolution. Note: This is Part II of a two-part course.

Course
Wednesday, March 24 to April 21, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

In this richly illustrated seminar, art historian Nancy G. Heller looks at the roots and later influences of radical American art from the last five decades, from pop and minimalism to the influence of identity politics. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Studio Arts
Wednesday, March 24, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Students learn how to use their ISO settings to darken and brighten photos, and how this relates to other camera settings such as aperture and shutter speed.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, March 25, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

The Seine flows through every aspect of daily life in Paris. Longtime New York Times foreign correspondent Elaine Sciolino leads a fascinating journey through its history and its myriad reflections in art, literature, music, and film, revealing how this fabled river defines and shapes the essence of a great city.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, March 25, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

Are you someone who winces at the word irregardless? Do you find it hard to believe someone who tells you, “I was literally climbing the walls”? Do you wish everyone would use the Oxford comma in lists of three items? If so, this lively examination of language with linguist Anne Curzan is for you. (Hopefully, you’ll come.)

Studio Arts
Thursday, March 25, 2021 – 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Beginning photographers learn how to use histograms, a graphic display of the brightness levels of pixels in an image—and an essential guide to achieving the correct exposure.  

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, March 27, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

From a Dutch artist’s workshop and a Frankfurt classroom in the 17th century to the streets of Washington in the early 1900s to musical stages today, women have been making strides in their fields that have often been overlooked, uncredited, or forgotten by time. Celebrate Women’s History Month by spending a fascinating day with four experts who bring to light an array of remarkable women who have lived in the shadows of history far too long.

Tour
Sunday, March 28, 2021 - 4:00 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. ET

Whether they are park-like retreats, centers of research, or incorporate both, the world’s botanical gardens are museums with living collections that tell unique stories. Naturalist Keith Tomlinson surveys six of the most remarkable, covering gardens from Singapore to South Africa, Morocco to Missouri. This session focuses on Arizona's Boyce Thompson Arboretum and Botanical Garden.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, March 30, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Naturalist Scott Weidensaul is joined in conversation by Jennifer Ackerman, New York Times best-selling author of The Bird Way, as they explore the science and sheer wonder of global bird migration.

Course
Tuesday, March 30 to April 20, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in the Early Renaissance, explores some of the great masterworks of art and architecture created from the late-14th to the 16th centuries as he examines the intellectual trends and social context that gave rise to such giants as Giotto, Botticelli, and Michelangelo. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, March 31, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

What’s in store for bread making? Find out when a panel of top bakers mix it up in a conversation that spans traditional and new methods of sourcing ingredients to trends in the baking process itself.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, April 2, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Mantua’s history is deeply connected to the Gonzaga dynasty. Their rule may have been tyrannical and warfare their principal occupation, but the family’s patronage brought into being some of the finest buildings and works of art of the Renaissance. Join art historian Elaine Ruffolo for a gaze into the dynamics of court life and the family who shaped a city. (World Art History Certificate elective, ½ credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, April 9, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. ET

Archaeological records show domesticated grape growing and winemaking in Israel and the Levant dates back more than 5000 years and is largely responsible for the evolution of modern wine. In this guided tasting with top sommelier Erik Segelbaum, explore Israeli wine's storied past, present, and future.

Tour
Sunday, April 11, 2021 - 4:00 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. ET

Whether they are park-like retreats, centers of research, or incorporate both, the world’s botanical gardens are museums with living collections that tell unique stories. Naturalist Keith Tomlinson surveys six of the most remarkable, covering gardens from Singapore to South Africa, Morocco to Missouri. This session focuses on Maryland's Brookside Gardens and Virginia's Meadowlark Gardens.

Tour
Sunday, April 25, 2021 - 4:00 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. ET

Whether they are park-like retreats, centers of research, or incorporate both, the world’s botanical gardens are museums with living collections that tell unique stories. Naturalist Keith Tomlinson surveys six of the most remarkable, covering gardens from Singapore to South Africa, Morocco to Missouri. This session focuses on Capetown's Kirstenbosch Botanic Garden.

Tour
Sunday, May 9, 2021 - 4:00 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. ET

Whether they are park-like retreats, centers of research, or incorporate both, the world’s botanical gardens are museums with living collections that tell unique stories. Naturalist Keith Tomlinson surveys six of the most remarkable, covering gardens from Singapore to South Africa, Morocco to Missouri. This session focuses on St. Louis's Missouri Botanical Garden.