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Smithsonian Associates - Entertaining, Informative, Eclectic, Insightful

Streaming Programs

Your newest link to our world of learning

Welcome to Smithsonian Associates Streaming, a new digital platform for the high-quality, engaging and varied programs that you’ve come to expect from us.

We invite you to join us from the comfort of your home as we present individual programs, multi-part courses, studio arts classes, and virtual study tours inspired by the Smithsonian’s research, collections and exhibitions. We’re excited to present this new aspect of our 55 years as the world’s largest museum-based educational program—and to have you be an important part of our future growth.

Explore all our offerings in this month's digital program guide.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, October 27, 2021 - 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

Explore a liberating style of abstract embroidery using an array of improvisational stitches on found fabric, specifically scraps of vintage kimono silk. Learn some of the principles of abstract art making, developing a language of marks through different stitches, and discuss color palettes, as well as how to “edit" what doesn't work in your composition.

Course
Wednesday, October 27, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Documentary filmmaker and writer Sara Lukinson looks at three remarkable memoirs, as different in approach and style as the lives they led. In this session, discuss A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway which conjures a fabled youth in Paris of the 1920s.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, October 27, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Hollywood can imagine impressive and convincing alien creatures, but is there any science behind our understanding of what extraterrestrial life might be like? Although we don’t know whether they’ll be green, zoologist Arik Kershenbaum shares his insights into how familiar they might be, using lessons from the behaviors that we see in animals on our own planet.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, October 27, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Whether it be fish nurseries, migratory bird pit stops, or natural water filterers, wetlands provide near limitless value to humans and wildlife around the world. Naturalist Liana Vitali of Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary in Upper Marlboro, Maryland, offers an audio-visual immersion into the marshes, ponds, swamps, and peat bogs of North America to discover just how important these ecosystems are to life on Earth.

Course
Thursday, October 28, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Join popular speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin for a fascinating exploration into the intimate relationship between the visible and invisible arts, and how music can literally bind the arts together in this fall series. This session focuses on The Artist as Musician, the Composer as Model. (World Art Certificate Program elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, October 28, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

To wage their bitter war with the powerful British Empire from 1919 to 1921, Irish nationalists turned to novel tactics both military and political: a strategy of assassinations, hit-and-run raids, and—a new concept—urban guerrilla warfare. Historian Kevin Matthews discusses how this conflict set the standard for other independence struggles in the 20th century.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, October 28, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Like a select few in music—Hoagy, Duke, Elvis, Wynton, Dolly—you recognize her by her first name alone. Join John Edward Hasse, co-curator of the long-running Smithsonian exhibition Ella Fitzgerald: First Lady of Song, as he draws on film and video clips, rare photographs, and original recordings to provide insights into her extraordinary journey from shy orphan to beloved international celebrity.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, October 28, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Serving as crew members on flights bringing servicemen into and out of combat zones at the height of the Vietnam War was a career adventure that the young women who became stewardesses at Pan Am World Airways in the 1960s and 70s could never have imagined. Drawing on her new book Come Fly the World, Julia Cooke discusses their often-overlooked wartime stories and examines why the role of Jet Age stewardess carried far more professional weight than simply being a flying waitress.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, October 29, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

James Watson and Francis Crick’s 1953 discovery of the double helix structure of DNA is the foundation of virtually every advance in our modern understanding of genetics and molecular biology. But the discovery of DNA’s structure is the story of five towering minds: Watson, Crick, Rosalind Franklin, Maurice Wilkins, and Linus Pauling. Howard Markel, professor of the history of medicine, provides a fascinating look at the discovery of DNA’s double helix.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, October 30, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Although less famous than their Tudor cousins, the Scottish Stuarts ruled over a period of growth and chaos that changed England and Scotland forever. Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger looks at the eventful hundred years of the Stuart reign.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, October 30, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. ET

Civilizations have risen and fallen for centuries on the banks of the Mekong River. Long before there was Phnom Penh, Hanoi, or Vientiane, there were the settlements in the areas now known as Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, and Thailand. Art historian Robert DeCaroli investigates the cultures that emerged along this massive 2,700-mile-long river. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, October 30, 2021 - 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Examine some basic styles of appliqué work used by American quiltmakers, past and present. Historical and contemporary examples illustrate techniques students can practice as they complete a project incorporating the suggested techniques.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, October 30, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET

Some book forms also make whimsical toys. Learn to construct a Halloween Jacob’s Ladder (with box), smash books that become stars or caterpillars, miniature button books, and more in this enjoyable workshop.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, November 1, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Experience art in a new way and discover deeper visual meanings as you relate selected art works to your life experience. In group discussions and creative studio activity, find new inspiration in works of art while developing your skills in decoding (reading) and encoding (expressing) visual meaning.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 1, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Whether created by artists such as Calder, Oldenburg, and Christo or generated from within communities, public art can powerfully speak to viewers through a wide variety of images, messages, materials, and settings. Art historian Janetta Rebold Benton surveys public art’s many forms, its creative roots and makers, and its social value. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Workshop
Monday, November 1, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Light can make or break your photos. Understand the essentials of shooting in a natural-light setting as you learn to gauge the direction of light; recognize degree of diffusion; minimize (or emphasize) lens flare; control conditions with lens hoods, and more.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 1, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Washington, D.C., has given much to the musical world beyond its best-known export, Duke Ellington. In a new series of programs, musician, broadcaster, and historian Ken Avis spotlights the city’s music traditions and how social change, technology, and business innovations shaped the sounds that emerged from D.C.—a political town with a serious music habit. This session focuses on D.C.'s acoustic folk and blues traditions.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, November 1, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. ET

Move beyond the technical "how to's" of photography and shift your focus to cultivating and strengthening your artistic vision. In small group discussions and critiques, explore ways how to pinpoint the idea, concept, and feeling you want to communicate with your work

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 2, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for three online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on Character: Discover Dimensions.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 2, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Since its very beginning, Hollywood has made audiences laugh in forms from slapstick to screwball, romance to social satire, musicals to gross-out teen films. Media expert Brian Rose looks at major highlights of screen comedy over the last 125 years, drawing on more than 40 examples from Hollywood’s funniest films. Prepare to LOL.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 2, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

To call Cokie Roberts a legendary journalist merely scratches the surface of the life of this bestselling author and champion for women who was a fixture on national radio and television for 40 years. Steve Roberts, journalist, author, educator and Cokie’s husband of 53 years, in conversation with their daughter Rebecca Roberts, reflects on Cokie’s many accomplishments and how she lived each day with a devotion to helping others.

Studio Arts Workshop
Tuesday, November 2, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Are you an absolute beginner in photography? Consider this class the place to start: 26 topics in 180 minutes, from A (apertures) to Z (zebra stripes)—and in a relaxed atmosphere with a community feel.

Course
Wednesday, November 3, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Documentary filmmaker and writer Sara Lukinson looks at three remarkable memoirs, as different in approach and style as the lives they led. In this session, discuss Conundrum by travel writer Jan Morris who gives a spellbinding account of her riskiest journey, becoming another physical version of herself.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, November 3, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Learn the fundamentals of drawing the human body through an exploration of the skeleton, planes of motion, gesture, musculature, and other key elements. Virtual anatomy software, a digital figure drawing site, and a variety of props allow students to discover how to convey motion.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, November 3, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Actor, writer, and producer Kal Penn took a sabbatical from his entertainment career to serve as an associate director in the White House Office of Public Engagement under President Obama—a very unexpected detour for the star of the Harold and Kumar movies and TV’s “House”. Join him as he draws from his new memoir You Can’t Be Serious to talk about his journey from Hollywood to Washington and back again, as well as why your life can have more stories and more choices than you thought.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, November 4, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The world's habitats are often organized into various categories that are mainly grounded in botany. But for an amateur naturalist, a more intuitive tool for identifying habitat classifications has been lacking—until now. Several professional nature guides discuss a new guide they’ve written that explains the entire globe's habitats from a much simpler perspective.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, November 4, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Beginning with cartoonist Thomas Nast’s lasting images of Uncle Sam and Santa Claus created during the Civil War, author Jeremy Dauber traces the sweeping story of cartoons, comic strips, and graphic novels, and their continuing hold on the American imagination.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, November 4, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Since 1782, Baltimore's Lexington Market—the oldest public market in America—has brought fresh food and delicious flavors to the community long before "farm to table" was a hot culinary trend. Christine Rai explores its history and the stories behind some of its best-known foods that define the authentic taste of Baltimore.

Studio Arts Course
Friday, November 5, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

With limited time and money, artists and other small business owners need an effective content strategy that makes posting quick, easy, and impactful. Learn to use every aspect of the Instagram app (reels, stories, IGTV, posts), optimize your profile, establish your brand, and create fun and engaging posts designed to retain and grow your following.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, November 5, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Many iconic churches and palaces in Florence were constructed to represent wealth and power, but architect Filippo Brunelleschi’s Hospital of the Innocents was the first institution in the world to be dedicated to the well-being of children. Renaissance art historian Elaine Ruffolo explores its architecture and magnificent charitable history. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Members-Only Program
Friday, November 5, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

In this members-only series led by veteran arts educator Roberta Gasbarre, go behind the scenes and into the working lives of some of the most intriguing people from all across the Smithsonian and Washington’s worlds of culture, science, and education. This program features Mandy Van Heuvelen, cultural interpreter manager at the National Museum of the American Indian, and film director Kelly Gardner discuss creating the multimedia museum theatre project Hear Me Say My Name.

Studio Arts Course
Friday, November 5, 2021 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Explore the creative possibilities of combining wool with other decorative elements such as metal, beads, and stones to make distinctive necklaces, rings, pendants, earrings, and other jewelry.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, November 5, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Chef Matthew Wendel, who spent many years working for President George W. Bush, shares recipes, photographs, stories, and memories of daily life as the personal chef and personal assistant to the president, as well as a career in which he served in positions at the State Department and the Office of Presidential Advance.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, November 6, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Ireland and Britain share a troubled past. Historian Jennifer Paxton untangles the complicated threads in the story of the Irish and British peoples and analyzes how a heritage of conflict is being transformed by new opportunities and new challenges.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, November 6, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Adobe Lightroom is the best program organizing and editing your photographs. You can work with either RAW or JPEG files. This two-session workshop offers users an excellent working understanding of the program.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, November 6, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

This year, send friends and family bespoke holiday cards. From the decorated envelope to the personalized sentiment, paper crafter Karen Cadogan shares tips and demonstrates techniques for creating simply elegant, unique cards that will become a keepsake long after the season ends. 

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, November 6, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

Paste painting, a surface design technique, uses mark-making tools to manipulate pigmented paste to create beautiful decorative papers. These sheets can be used in books, collage, cards, and more.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, November 6, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

Learn the basics of filmmaking from pre-production to shooting to post-production, working with your iPhone. Each participant creates a short video to share with the class.

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, November 6, 2021 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The jewel-like pigment of soft pastels is perfect for capturing the glow of sunlight as it illuminates the landscape. Guided by a master pastel painter, create artworks as you learn the medium’s techniques and nuances.

Studio Arts Course
Sunday, November 7, 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. ET

Socks are among the most popular knitting projects, because they are easy to carry, quick to complete, and require some techniques that keep the knitter's interest. Learn how to make socks in a supportive, low-pressure setting, with time between sessions to work on projects.

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, November 7, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Film music can inspire and romance us, salvage a bad movie and make a good one great. In this weekend series, speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin explores the many elements that go into creating an effective score and showcases the memorable work of some of the leading masters of the form. Fasten your seatbelts…it’s going to be a fabulous ride! This session focuses on film music from The Red Pony, High Noon, and The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly.

Course
Sunday, November 7, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. ET

The notion that a picture is worth a thousand words is meant to convey the power of imagery. But what of the power of words—if they are Hemingway’s musings on a work of art, Van Gogh’s personal letters, or Michelangelo’s thoughts on his life and art expressed in his poetry? Explore the alchemy that occurs at the intersection of art and literature with David Gariff,  senior lecturer at the National Gallery of Art.  This session focuses on The Poetry of Michelangelo. (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 8, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Some moments in movies never leave us: the piercing eyes of a private eye, a raft hurtling down the rapids, that little black dress, the close-up of a fading movie star. In a 5-session film discussion series, documentary filmmaker and writer Sara Lukinson revisits some of our favorite movies and characters, setting them against the backdrop of their times, the people who dreamed them up, and the America they reflected—or asked us to imagine. This session focuses on Anatomy of a Murder and 12 Angry Men.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 8, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

In the 1890s, the first great American musical craze, ragtime, swept the nation—and the sounds of the parlor piano would never be the same. Composer and pianist Orin Grossman traces the form from its beginnings to the more complex styles of stride and “novelty” piano in a lively and entertaining program that includes Joplin’s wonderful rags and a few of his own arrangements of favorite Gershwin’s songs.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 8, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. ET

Senator Elizabeth Warren’s political outlook is grounded in the experiences of growing up in Oklahoma. She shares those valuable life lessons with the next generation of leaders—especially young girls—in her newest book, Pinkie Promises. Join Warren as she shares the inspiration behind the book, the meaning of “pinkie promises,” and what girls can achieve, even when told they cannot.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 9, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for three online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on Setting: Explore Place and Time.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 9, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

What was it like to be a Jewish citizen in Venice between their settlement there in the 16th century to the end of World War II? From the beginning, the rules that governed Jewish life in the ghetto—a Venetian word—contrasted greatly with those outside the quarter. Historian Monica Chojnacka highlights the complicated history of the Venetian Jews and places it in the context of greater European history.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 9, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Eleanor of Aquitaine is the stuff of legend. Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger considers how the many stories have grown from the real life of the ambitious and powerful woman who managed to become queen consort of England and France and shaped the reigns of two of England’s most famous kings: Richard the Lionheart and King John.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, November 9, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Learn how to take great photographs of architecture and public art. Class discussions include techniques and camera settings for cityscapes, individual buildings, architectural details, contemporary public art, monuments and memorials, and more.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 9, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

The elusive, complex, and baffling scent of the truffle sent James Beard-award-winning author Rowan Jacobsen down a rabbit hole. He emerged into a mysterious secretive world of black-market deals, obsessive chefs, and some very determined dogs. Hear Jacobsen’s colorful account of this world, and the memorable truffle hunters he met along the way.

Course
Wednesday, November 10, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Pop music would not be the same without Carole King, Tina Turner, Billy Joel, and Neil Diamond. Their music defined the summer of a generation’s youth, and now the whole world still sings their songs. In this 2-session daytime series, join Sara Lukinson, filmmaker and writer for the Kennedy Center Honors for 38 years, to talk about the lives of these performing arts legends, enjoy clips of their performances, and explore what made them so moving, memorable, and exciting. This session focuses on Carole King and Tina Turner.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, November 10, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Pure Land Buddhism—the most popular of the Buddhist traditions in the East—remains  surprisingly unknown in the West. For a closer look at its thought and practice, join Charles B. Jones, professor of religion at the Catholic University of America, who traces the practice’s history and shares some of the features and goals of this prevalent form of Buddhism.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, November 10, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

In 1932 Frank Lloyd Wright published The Disappearing City, a polemic about the evils of urban centers. He envisioned a better future centered on the automobile, telephone and radio, and mass production, integrated to bring mobility, freedom, and choice to the individual. In a richly illustrated program, Bill Keene examines the apparent contradictions between Wright’s essentially anti-city views and his ongoing fascination with work to enhance urban life. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, November 11, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

In the early years of the 20th century, Paris became a magnet for artists from all over the world and the birthplace for some of the principal innovations of modern art. Using high-definition Deep Zoom technology, Barnes Foundation educator Penny Hansen guides a live virtual tour that highlights works in the museum’s collection by Picasso, Matisse, Modigliani, and Soutine that bring this seminal period to life. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Friday, November 12, 2021 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Breathe new life into your unfinished or "failed" collages or paintings. Find ways to infuse interest and create a variety of compositions to change the look and feel of your pieces.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, November 12, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Expand your knowledge of the world of wine as you sip along with sommelier Erik Segelbaum in an exploration of Oregon’s signature grapes. This immersive program includes a curated personal tasting kit to enhance the experience.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, November 13, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

For nearly two millennia, Augustine’s arguments, insights, and ideas on faith have profoundly shaped the Western intellectual tradition. Augustine scholar Scott MacDonald explores some of those enduringly compelling ideas.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, November 13, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Understanding Italian architecture is understanding Western Civilization. No country has produced such an extraordinary number of iconic architectural monuments. Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in the Early Renaissance, traces the evolution of Italian architecture from its ancient Roman origins through the Middle Ages, and concludes with the breathtaking theatrics of Baroque architecture. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, November 13, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET

This two-part workshop focuses on the art of self-portraiture through photography and students will have the opportunity to create their own self-portraits.

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, November 14, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Film music can inspire and romance us, salvage a bad movie and make a good one great. In this weekend series, speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin explores the many elements that go into creating an effective score and showcases the memorable work of some of the leading masters of the form. Fasten your seatbelts…it’s going to be a fabulous ride! This session focuses on film music from To Kill a Mockingbird, Psycho, and Planet of the Apes.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, November 15, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Explore many new techniques and build new skills as you create four small projects in an intermediate-level course.

Course
Monday, November 15, 2021 - 1:00 p.m. to 2:15 p.m. ET

Art historian Joseph Cassar examines important masterworks within selected genres and offers a new way to understand and appreciate the similarities among—and the uniqueness of—the artists and the cultural norms that influenced their choices. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 15, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Washington, D.C., has given much to the musical world beyond its best-known export, Duke Ellington. In a new series of programs, musician, broadcaster, and historian Ken Avis spotlights the city’s music traditions and how social change, technology, and business innovations shaped the sounds that emerged from D.C.—a political town with a serious music habit. This session focuses on D.C.'s soul, funk, and go-go traditions.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 16, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for three online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on Story: Imagine Possibilities.

Studio Arts Workshop
Tuesday, November 16, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Use flowing watercolors to create a poinsettia that blooms all year. Learn how to quickly draw a poinsettia or trace one. Finish the class with a watercolor poinsettia to give as a gift, or use the image to make prints for cards.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 16, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Yoga originated in India thousands of years ago and has become a part of the lives of many millions around the globe. Comparative religion scholar and yogi Graham M. Schweig examines the many facets of the practice as he answers the most basic of questions: What is yoga?

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 16, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

We often think of the civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome as discrete incubators of Western culture. However, Greece and Rome did not develop in isolation. The lands to the north of the Greek and Roman peninsulas were inhabited by non-literate communities that stretched from the Atlantic Ocean to the Ural Mountains. Archaeologist Peter Bogucki reveals the development of these nearly forgotten people from the Stone Age through the collapse of the Roman Empire in the west.

Course
Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Pop music would not be the same without Carole King, Tina Turner, Billy Joel, and Neil Diamond. Their music defined the summer of a generation’s youth, and now the whole world still sings their songs. In this 2-session daytime series, join Sara Lukinson, filmmaker and writer for the Kennedy Center Honors for 38 years, to talk about the lives of these performing arts legends, enjoy clips of their performances, and explore what made them so moving, memorable, and exciting. This session focuses on Billy Joel and Neil Diamond.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The ancient city of Ephesus in southwestern Turkey offers a sense of timelessness. Structures from the ancient world found there today include the Temple of Artemis—one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient Word—the Library of Celsus, and Hadrian’s Temple. Author, filmmaker, and tour guide Serif Yenen highlights the rich history and archaeological wonders of Ephesus.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Art historian Bonita Billman examines how a group of painters created powerful and personal works that revealed unvarnished truths about urban life in the early 20th century. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

For thousands of years people have wondered if there are planets like Earth, if they’re common, and if any have signs of life. Sara Seager, a professor of physics and planetary science at MIT who is one of the leading experts on the search for Earth-like planets, shares the latest advances in this revolutionary field. Afterward, Peter Plavchan, a professor of physics and astronomy at George Mason University, brings the skies into your living room with remote control of the GMU Observatory.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, November 18, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The Lady with the Unicorn tapestries celebrate a world in which unicorns—no less than lions, bunny rabbits, or refined ladies—surely exist. Barbara Drake Boehm, curator emerita of the Met Cloisters, leads a virtual visit to the Cluny Museum to explore the exceptionally rich imagery, the history—real and imagined—and meaning behind these charming early 16th-century masterpieces. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Workshop
Thursday, November 18, 2021 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Learn a mindful-drawing approach to botanical sketching. This workshop emphasizes freedom to interpret botanicals with line sketching by observing the geometric and organic shapes of plants.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, November 18, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

The Old English epic poem Beowulf tells the rollicking tale of a fearless hero who defeats two monsters and a dragon. But does the story contain a kernel of historical truth? And what can it teach us about life in early England? Jennifer Paxton, a scholar of English and Irish history, explores how Beowulf provides a window into a society that struggled to balance the competitive forces that the warrior ethos often unleashed.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, November 18, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

General Black Jack Pershing’s 1916 “Punitive Expedition” into Mexico was intended to capture Pancho Villa in retribution for an attack on a small New Mexico town carried out by his revolutionary forces. Although it failed in its objective, historian Dakota Springston examines how the expedition changed American warfare and why the United States’ first truly mechanized conflict served as a testing ground for the country’s entry into WWI.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, November 19, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Kevin Tervala, associate curator of African art at the Baltimore Museum of Art, explores the monumental and aesthetically innovative structures made from mud and earthen material built across the African continent—and how they communicated fundamental social, cultural, and religious beliefs. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, November 20, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Adobe Lightroom is the best program organizing and editing your photographs. You can work with either RAW or JPEG files. This two-session workshop offers users an excellent working understanding of the program.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, November 20, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Create colorful poinsettias as you learn floral papercraft techniques. At the workshop’s end, leave with the ability to complete two realistic poinsettia shrubs.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, November 20, 2021 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Using mini-canvases as the base, decorative embellishments, and photos and other personal mementos, create one-of-a-kind small hanging artworks that can be individualized to fit any occasion for giving.

Studio Arts Workshop
Sunday, November 21, 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Take a break from the stress of the season to enjoy an entertaining and informative afternoon with an orchid expert and come away with an elegant orchid centerpiece.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 22, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

The geologic story of the rugged San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado reveals an explosive volcanic origin, including 18 supervolcano eruptions that peaked between 26 and 28 million years ago. Join volcanologist Kirt Kempter on a virtual tour of the region to discover how these massive eruptions forever transformed the landscape in the blink of an eye.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 23, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Orchid expert Barbara Schmidt leads a tour of several of the most exotic and beautiful collections in the United States. In virtual visits from California to Florida to Pennsylvania, a specialist from each botanical garden shares what makes their collection unique and highlights some of its rarest orchids.

Course
Monday, November 29, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

In a 3-session evening series, historian Justin M. Jacobs presents in-depth overviews of three particularly intriguing UNESCO World Heritage sites. This session focuses on the Forbidden City in Beijing.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 29, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Washington, D.C., has given much to the musical world beyond its best-known export, Duke Ellington. In a new series of programs, musician, broadcaster, and historian Ken Avis spotlights the city’s music traditions and how social change, technology, and business innovations shaped the sounds that emerged from D.C.—a political town with a serious music habit. This session focuses on D.C.'s 21st century music scene.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 30, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

At the center of the vibrant world of 15th-century Florence was a bookstore beside the Bargello run by Vespasiano da Bisticci—known as the “king of the world’s booksellers.” He created magnificent libraries and deluxe manuscripts for clients that included popes, kings, and three generations of Medici. Author Ross King paints a portrait of the intellectual, political, and religious ferment of this world through a bookseller’s eyes.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 30, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

In the shadow of the Second World War and the looming threat of nuclear holocaust, British philosopher Bertrand Russell signaled an urgent need to recover the practice of philosophy in everyday life. Steven M. Emmanuel, dean of the Susan S. Goode School of Arts and Humanities at Virginia Wesleyan University, examines Russell’s writings on the practical value of philosophy to find important and timely lessons for today’s turbulent and uncertain times.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 30, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Throughout the Middle Ages the vast majority of Jews lived under either Islamic rule or Christian rule. Under caliphate rule across North Africa and the Middle East, Jews flourished. In contrast, life in Christian Europe was fraught with challenges. Historian Gary Rendsburg focuses on how the Jews survived during the Middle Ages, the period that bridges their historical roots in the land of Israel and the dawn of modernity brought on by the Renaissance.

Studio Arts Workshop
Tuesday, November 30, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

You don’t necessarily need great light to make a great photo. Understand the essentials of night photography and tripods as you learn to manage longer exposure times and exposure modes and compensation, choose the right tripod, work with remote shutter-release triggers, use your camera’s self-timer, and more.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, November 30, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Use traditional botanical illustration techniques such as continuous tone, parallel line, and scumble to build 3D shading and texture, to create a realistic line drawing working with graphite.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, December 1, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Hollywood is an industry that has always depended on blockbusters. But beginning in 1974, two young filmmakers, Steven Spielberg and George Lucas, would together change the way the movie industry made movies, introducing the age of the “modern blockbuster,” which featured elaborate special effects and thrilling spectacle. Brian Rose, professor emeritus at Fordham University, looks at their four decades of filmmaking and discusses how they changed the movies.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, December 1, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Learn the strange history of a small group of pro-slavery sympathizers who, in the 1850s, formed the Knights of the Golden Circle, a secret society whose goal it was to create a vast new empire for slavery that extended into Mexico and South America.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, December 1, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Quickly capture your travels with loose lines and painterly colors with the quick-sketch watercolors method. This technique is perfect for studies, travel journals, and finished fine art.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, December 1, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Streaming Program Option: Jodi Picoult draws inspiration from real-life events once again in her new novel, Wish You Were Here. Set in March 2020, it tells the story of what happens when best-laid plans go awry when the world turns upside down. Join Picoult as she discusses the timely book and her research and writing process.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, December 1, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

Myths surrounding so-called “human races”—often used as evidence of the innate superiority or inferiority of individuals, groups, or nations—can be traced from ancient Greeks to Darwin to Nazi Germany to today. Evolutionary biologist Rui Diogo examines how scientific research and scholarship have played crucial roles in buttressing prejudice—and how false racially based beliefs still continue to color political discourse and social media.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, December 2, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Peter Carl Faberge is best known and remembered for the amazing imperial Easter eggs he created for the last Russian Tsar’s wife and mother. He and his firm also designed and produced jewelry and decorative pieces of unparalleled workmanship. Art critic and author Judy Pomeranz examines the life and times of Faberge, his extraordinary art, and his illustrious clients. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, December 2, 2021 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Bring an animal portrait to life—and add a new skill to your drawing toolbox. Describe a form on toned paper using contour line and highlights while considering negative and positive space.

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, December 2, 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Merge recent findings on visual perception with familiar elements of art to discover how your paintings can take on new and fresh creative edges.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, December 2, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

The Shroud of Turin has been an object of reverence and fascination since it surfaced in mid-14th century France. Historian Cheryl White and the Rev. Peter Mangum, noted specialists in the study of the shroud, explore the mystery of this artifact through its known history and scientific findings, as well as the current state of research and scholarship. What stories held in this cloth are yet to be told?

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, December 3, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

Post-impressionism was less a negative reaction to impressionism than a desire to improve upon it. Art historian Janetta Rebold Benton presents an intimate look at the background, life, and art of four post-impressionist luminaries. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Friday, December 3, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Circular weaving is a fun and versatile technique for new weavers as well as experienced fiber artists. Learn how to warp and weave on several sizes of circle looms as you create projects from coasters to cushions to home décor.

Members-Only Program
Friday, December 3, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

In this members-only series led by veteran arts educator Roberta Gasbarre, go behind the scenes and into the working lives of some of the most intriguing people from all across the Smithsonian and Washington’s worlds of culture, science, and education. This program features mixed-media artist, Sharon Robinson.

Studio Arts Workshop
Friday, December 3, 2021 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Learn to transform a milkweed pod and its floss into a whimsical nesting swan that will add a touch of nature to your holiday décor.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, December 3, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Although its vision of a coming decade of peace, prosperity, and progress collapsed into the fires of WWII, the 1939 World’s Fair succeeded in providing a captivating glimpse into the science, technology, and innovation of the future. Historian Allen Pietrobon examines how, despite the clash of international politics, the dazzling exhibition drew huge crowds to a former Queens dumping ground transformed into Flushing Meadow.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, December 4, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The Arts and Crafts Movement was a dominant influence in visual and decorative arts and architecture in England and the United States around the turn of the last century. Art historian Bonita Billman explores the flowering and legacy of this movement. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, December 4, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

In a morning of artistic experimentation designed to deepen skills in visual expression, explore five modes of visual thinking including working from memory, observation, imagination, narrative, and experimental approaches.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, December 4, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Create four different fancy-fold cards sure to impress the people on your holiday card list! Fancy folds can be intimidating, but this workshop painlessly guides you through the steps. Detailed instructions provide you with everything you need to create future fancy folds on your own.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, December 4, 2021 - 11:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Virtually escape to Tuscany by drawing poppies with flowing organic lines, then painting the scene with mingling colors. Add interest by painting an old stone wall or sun-dappled trees. Create drama with light and shadow.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, December 4, 2021 - 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Inspired by the 6-Word Memoir Project, learn to capture quick images of personal stories in quilted wall-hangings.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, December 4, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. ET

Learn the techniques needed to create unique fine mosaic jewelry as you create beautiful silver-plate mosaic pendants using a wide variety of materials.

Studio Arts Course
Sunday, December 5, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Get the most out of your digital mirrorless or SLR camera by taking part in this workshop, which provides a solid introduction to these cameras’ features and potential.

Course
Sunday, December 5, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. ET

The notion that a picture is worth a thousand words is meant to convey the power of imagery. But what of the power of words—if they are Hemingway’s musings on a work of art, Van Gogh’s personal letters, or Michelangelo’s thoughts on his life and art expressed in his poetry? Explore the alchemy that occurs at the intersection of art and literature with David Gariff,  senior lecturer at the National Gallery of Art.  This session focuses on Ernest Hemingway, Joan Miró, and The Farm (1921-22). (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, December 5, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. ET

Taliesin, the Wisconsin home and studio of architect Frank Lloyd Wright, was witness to some of the greatest tragedies of his life, as well as some of his greatest triumphs. Join Taliesin historian Keiran Murphy as she tells the story of the iconic house and how it reflects decades of shifts in Wright's personal and professional life. (World Art Certificate Program elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Monday, December 6, 2021 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Showcase your writing or art in a book as unique as you are. Book artist Sushmita Mazumdar guides students as they work with a variety of traditional and nontraditional materials to craft one-of-a kind storybooks.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, December 6, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

More than simply the inspiration for the poem that later became our national anthem, the War of 1812 was a watershed moment in the history of a young republic. Historian Richard Bell examines this misunderstood conflict that established the credibility of the newly formed United States and cemented American citizens’ own sense of themselves as a nation apart, emerging from the crucible of war a proud and patriotic people.

Course
Monday, December 6, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

In a 3-session evening series, historian Justin M. Jacobs presents in-depth overviews of three particularly intriguing UNESCO World Heritage sites. This session focuses on the Canadian Rocky Mountain Parks.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, December 6, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Explore a spectacular land of fire and ice in a virtual field trip led by volcanologist Kirt Kempter, who spotlights the key features that make Iceland a bucket-list destination for all geologists.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, December 7, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover the power of reflective writing guided by the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s Writing Salon, Mary Hall Surface. Experience new ways to contemplate the gifts of winter inspired by the vibrant Winter Landscape by Wassily Kandinsky, an artist who embraced the transcendent power of color.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, December 7, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

For centuries no one had been aware of the ancient Indus civilization. Today we know it was as ancient and extensive as those of Egypt and Mesopotamia. Historian and science writer Andrew Robinson introduces this tantalizing ‘lost’ civilization that uniquely combined artistic excellence, technological sophistication, and economic vigor with social egalitarianism, political freedom, and religious moderation.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, December 7, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

Duccio di Buoninsegna and Giotto di Bondone revolutionized the field of Italian painting in the 14th century. Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in the Early Renaissance, compares Duccio’s and Giotto’s art and examines the characteristics that defined their respective schools of painting. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, December 7, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

When Andrew Johnson assumed the presidency after Abraham Lincoln’s assassination, African Americans were optimistic that he would pursue aggressive federal policies for Black equality. However, author Robert S. Levine addresses the conflicts that led Frederick Douglass and the wider Black community to reject Johnson and reveals the lost promise and dire failure of Reconstruction.

Studio Arts Workshop
Wednesday, December 8, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Just in time for the holidays, create a modern wreath design with fresh evergreens on a metal hoop.  Using a method similar to floral arrangement, combine local textures, shapes, and colors in your design.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, December 8, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

The sound of their music for Broadway, films, and television defined the spirit and mood of mid-century America—and continues to captivate us. In a lively evening, pianist, raconteur, and American music specialist Robert Wyatt celebrates the lives and works of Rodgers and Hammerstein, icons of the American musical whose songs elevated the human spirit.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, December 8, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

It was a startling, unheard-of idea: to remake Shakespeare’s romantic tragedy into a musical set in the streets of New York City. Filmmaker and writer Sara Lukinson looks at West Side Story’s creators who risked everything, broke all rules, reshaped the American theater, and gave us a contemporary masterpiece, as well as how new interpretations are re-making the show for our times.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, December 9, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Although the Barnes Foundation is widely known for its post-impressionist and early modern art, its extensive African collection has long been central to the museum’s educational mission. Using high-definition Deep Zoom technology, Barnes educator Penny Hansen guides a live virtual tour that surveys highlights of these distinctive holdings. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, December 9, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Joseph Luzzi, a professor of comparative literature at Bard College, explores the fascinating world of Shakespeare through Maggie O’Farrell’s celebrated 2020 novel Hamnet. He considers the links between her fictional reconstruction of the life and tragic death of William Shakespeare’s young son and the playwright’s actual works.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, December 9, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Pati Jinich’s newest cookbook brings together the signature recipes that Mexican home cooks, market vendors, and chefs have shared with her as she crisscrossed her native country for the past decade. Join her as she examines how these dishes represent the historic culinary diversity of the nation—and offers tips on how to bring the iconic tastes of Mexico into your own kitchen.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, December 9, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The tumultuous friendship between George Harrison and Eric Clapton shaped not only their lives and careers but the shifting face of rock music in the early 1970s. Beatles expert Ken Womack and music historian Jason Kruppa explore the rock legends’ musical and personal collaboration, friendship, and rivalry—and a love triangle for the ages, involving Clapton, Harrison, and Harrison’s wife Pattie Boyd.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, December 10, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

From the sunny fields of the Mediterranean to the misty meadows of England, the history of lavender spans civilizations, centuries, and continents. Speaker and food historian Christine Rai explores lavender's role in history, art, music, literature, religion, and folklore, and how it continues to compel us today.

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, December 11, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

Take your iPhone camera skills to another level in a two-day workshop that focuses on the ProCamera app and editing techniques; organizing, printing, and posting your photos; and a critique session on images.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, December 11, 2021 - 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

No home in America celebrates the holidays quite like the White House, and behind each annual celebration is a first lady who lends her distinctive style to the festivities. Historian Coleen Christian Burke, a former White House holiday design partner, surveys the signature holiday decorating style of modern residents from Jackie Kennedy to Jill Biden.

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, December 11, 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. ET

Whether you know how to knit a scarf but not much more, used to knit but now feel rusty, or are confident in your beginning knitting skills but want to make sure you're ready for an intermediate class or project, this workshop is for you.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, December 11, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Expand your knowledge of the world of wine as you sip along with sommelier Erik Segelbaum in a tasting of wines from across the globe made under the oversight and collaboration of Château Lafite Rothschild’s head winemaker. This immersive program includes a curated personal tasting kit to enhance the experience.

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, December 12, 2021 - 4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. ET

The landscape of Florida is unlike any other in the United States. Deciduous forests give way to subtropical wetlands, savannahs, and emerald palm-lined beaches. Join interpretive naturalist and popular tour leader Keith Tomlinson on a journey around the best of the peninsula that highlights some of the best places to hike, swim, and camp.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, December 13, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Virtually join art historian and culinary expert Elaine Trigiani in her 15th-century Tuscan farmhouse for a look at Venice through its artistic and culinary heritage. Learn how Giambattista Tiepolo became the 18th-century master of the Venetian school of painting. Then, watch her demonstrate the preparation of cicchetti, a favorite snack of today’s Venetian cocktail hour scene. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, December 13, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Dylan Thomas is among the 20th century’s most romantic and tragic figures, famous not only for his lyrical, soul-stirring poetry, but also his turbulent, hard-drinking lifestyle. Join us as we “burn and rave at close of day” in a celebration of this incandescent spirit. Author Daniel Stashower explores Thomas’s life and legacy, and actor Scott Sedar offers dramatic readings of some of his most celebrated poems.

Course
Monday, December 13, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

In a 3-session evening series, historian Justin M. Jacobs presents in-depth overviews of three particularly intriguing UNESCO World Heritage sites. This session focuses on the Redwood National and State Parks.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, December 13, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Tapped by his one-time political rival Abraham Lincoln to become secretary of the treasury, Salmon P. Chase proved essential to the Civil War effort and pressed the president to emancipate the country’s slaves and recognize Black rights. Biographer Walter Stahr sheds new light on a complex and fascinating political figure, as well as on the pivotal events of the Civil War and its aftermath.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, December 14, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

At the start of the First World War, a handful of volunteers created an all-American fighter squadron in the French Air Service, the legendary Lafayette Escadrille. Join filmmakers Paul Glenshaw and Darroch Greer, creators of a new documentary on the squadron, as they trace its beginnings, the colorful characters in it, and their motivations—some noble, some opportunistic—to risk their lives for America’s oldest ally.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, December 15, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

The festivals, special foods, and spectacular customs of the holiday season last a glorious three weeks in Italy! Join food historian Francine Segan for a lively presentation on the many splendors of Christmas and New Year in Italy.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, December 16, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

Art historian Robert DeCaroli examines the sites and structures that made up the urban landscape of the Khmer Empire and traces the historical shifts, royal decisions, religious beliefs, and cultural processes that led to its development. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, December 17, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

As a young man, Leonardo da Vinci wrote about finding the skeleton of a great “fish” while roaming in the hills of Tuscany. What followed was decades of interest in fossils and informed speculation about the planet’s history. Biologist Kay Etheridge examines how this fascination with fossils is reflected in his artworks.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, December 20, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Everyone loves a holiday visit to Bedford Falls. But it took years for Frank Capra’s now-beloved film—a flop in its 1946 release—to become a Christmas classic. Lecturer Brian Rose examines the fascinating story of It’s a Wonderful Life, looking at the challenges of how it was made, its surprisingly dark portrait of small-town life, and how it evolved into the ultimate portrayal of holiday goodwill and cheer.

Course
Tuesday, January 4, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can spark creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for five online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on character.

Course
Wednesday, January 5, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

In a 4-session course, popular speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin uses her unique live piano demonstrations and both historic and contemporary film clips to illustrate how the music from such ballet masterpieces as Giselle, Swan Lake, Daphnis and Chloë, Le Sacre du Printemps, and Appalachian Spring became a treasured part of our cultural landscape.

Course
Wednesday, January 5, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Chinese civilization has given rise to some of the world’s most remarkable artistic creations. Art historian Robert DeCaroli examines how, across the centuries, social, religious, and political life have influenced transformations in China’s material culture. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, January 6, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Join Christine Rai to explore how Dutch history geography, and climate shaped its distinct cheese styles and how cheese has played a role in the wider culture of the Netherlands. In addition to the fascinating history, she surveys how today’s Dutch cheese makers are innovating beyond their roots and shares tips and suggestions for savoring a range of delicious Dutch cheeses.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, January 7, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Rivalries can be dangerous and frustrating, but they can also fuel the creation of great works of art—as was the case among the Renaissance masters. Renaissance art historian Elaine Ruffolo brings into sharp focus the artistic rivalry among these painters and the often-overwhelming emotional and professional pressures that compelled them to create. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, January 8, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

How do we unlock the mysteries of a great poem? Discover the fascinating world of poetic form and gain a better understanding of the internal mechanisms and strategies that poets employ in their art.

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, January 9, 2022 - 4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. ET

One of the world’s most striking natural wonders, Yosemite National Park is much more than “the valley.” Keith Tomlinson, an interpretive naturalist and popular tour leader, examines the area’s glacial history, plant life, emerging climate issues, and distinctive topography.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, January 10, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

The Founders—and their true intentions for our young nation—are often the subject of heated debates. But what do we really know about how their ideas evolved? Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Joseph Ellis explores how the complexities of the struggle helped the Founders find a way to form a new nation.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, January 10, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The romantic feminine lines and chic textured suits that emerged in Paris after the austerity of WWII are admired even today. Christian Dior’s luxurious bounty of expansive skirts with tiny wasp waists and Coco Chanel’s impeccably tailored signature suits defined the arc of fashion in the 1950s. Join design historian Elizabeth Lay as she looks at the seeds of each style, the customers who bought these marvelous designs, and the minute details of haute couture that set these fashions apart from the ordinary.

Course
Tuesday, January 11, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can spark creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for five online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on setting.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, January 11, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Historian Allen Pietrobon takes us back to the Eisenhower era, a time before the “celebrity president.” He reveals how Sen. John F. Kennedy’s domination of the medium during the first-ever televised debate was key in his winning the presidency. Pietrobon also uses the 1960 presidential election as a lens to explore American politics and culture in this pivotal era in history.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, January 12, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

PBS television host Darley Newman shares insights into the Alabama Civil Rights Trail, which traces the footsteps of civil rights legends such as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks, whose stories are told in the museums, churches, and other landmarks lining the trail. Darley suggests area guides and experts who can enhance your experience.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, January 13, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

The Barnes holds 59 of Henri Matisse’s works, including his fauvist masterpiece Le Bonheur de Vivre, and the The Dance, commissioned by collector Albert Barnes in 1930. The collection’s 46 works by Pablo Picasso range from The Peasants, which greets visitors in the main room, evolving to his Head of a Woman (Tête de femme). Barnes educator Penny Hansen uses high-definition Deep Zoom technology to explore the artists’ work and influence on 20th-century modernism. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, January 13, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

From the late 1920s through the end of World War II, Hollywood studios dominated film production both in America and throughout the world, producing some the best-loved and most significant movies ever made. Brian Rose, a professor emeritus at Fordham University, examines the forces that shaped this giant of global filmmaking and the special nature of its achievements during its golden age—as well as the factors that brought this short-lived period to a final fadeout.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, January 13, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Baltimore's Federal Hill holds a prominent place in the city's history and lent its name to a distinctive and appealing South Baltimore neighborhood.  Arts journalist and Baltimore resident Richard Selden leads an illustrated virtual tour of both the hill itself, with its storied monuments and stunning views, and the urban village that surrounds it.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, January 13, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The saga of our home planet is far more spectacular than any Hollywood blockbuster (Boiling seas of lava! Meteor strikes! Towering sheets of ice!). But only recently have we begun to piece together the whole mystery into a coherent narrative. Andrew H. Knoll, a geologist and professor at Harvard University, offers a short biography of Earth, charting its epic 4.6-billion-year story and placing 21st-century climate change in deep context.

Course
Tuesday, January 18, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can spark creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for five online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on dialogue.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, January 18, 2022 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Get an introduction to stylized lettering, including altered block letters, botanical borders, and illuminated initials with vines and flourishes.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, January 18, 2022 - 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Learn simple and easy techniques to create land and seascape paintings. Special emphasis is given to various watercolor techniques such as wet-on-wet, wet-on-dry, and masking.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, January 18, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Popular theory on right side brain activity holds that the right brain is primarily responsible for the intuitive understanding of visual and spatial relationships. Designed to improve the way people see and record objects on paper, this class provides a set of visual exercises to help build the ability to draw.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, January 18, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Gain increased confidence in your weaving skills and take your tapestry to the next level. Knowledge of basic tapestry weaving is required.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, January 18, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The story of Jerusalem is the tale of how science, politics, and religion meet in its shadowy subterranean spaces. Journalist Andrew Lawler traces that buried history as he discusses the early explorers who navigated sewage-filled passages; follows the European, American, and Israeli archaeologists who made stunning discoveries beneath the city; and explores how these finds became essential elements in the battle to control the Holy City.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, January 19, 2022 - 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

Learn to embrace and celebrate the unpredictability, versatility, and beauty of watercolor. Class discussions cover supplies; color theory, palettes and pigment control; and various exercises and experiments to achieve different effects.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, January 19, 2022 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Whether you want to work in digital or film, this course offers a solid foundation for new photographers ready to learn the basics.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, January 19, 2022 - 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

Learn the basics of hand-stitched quilt-making—including piecing, applique, and finishing techniques—as you work on a small-scale piece that can be used as a doll quilt or a wall hanging.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, January 19, 2022 - 1:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Create your own story as you learn to upcycle book pages as surfaces for drawing, painting, and collage using gelatin plate prints, textures, photo transfers, drawing, painting, and text redaction.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, January 19, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Students are introduced to the materials, tools, and technologies used in collage and assemblage. They find inspiration in artists who worked in collage including Joseph Cornell, Romare Bearden, and Gertrude Green.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, January 19, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Whether you work digitally or on film, this course is ideal for students who are familiar with their cameras but are interested in expanding their understanding of photography fundamentals.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, January 19, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

This intermediate-level photography course offers a better understanding of compositional elements and practices—such as simplicity, balance, and natural lighting—that promote taking better and more unique photographs.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, January 19, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Biographer Bob Spitz tells the story of how Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, Robert Plant, and John Bonham came together to form the legendary rock band Led Zeppelin—one of the most successful (and certainly one of the most notorious) bands of all time.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, January 20, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Despite prejudice, prosecution, and political setbacks, nothing could force out the Jews of Kazimierz—a district of Krakow in Poland established in the 14th century. For centuries, they built their lives here, gaining religious and other freedoms along the way—until the Holocaust. Author and tour guide Christopher Skutela surveys the district’s rich history, its sites, and its significance.

Course
Thursday, January 20, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Using a medley of filmed performances, documentary filmmaker and cultural historian Sara Lukinson traces how some of our favorite love songs from the American songbook came to be in a 3-session winter series and how re-imaginings by different artists, unexpected arrangements, and changing times transformed them into something more. This session focuses on “My Funny Valentine” and “Someone to Watch Over Me.”

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, January 20, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Explore the basis of abstraction by studying color, line, and shape as they relate to composition. Learn to create exciting and innovative works of art, using a series of drawing and painting exercises designed to examine non-traditional ways of handling traditional materials and subject matter.

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, January 20, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Take your skills beyond auto mode as you explore a myriad of your digital camera’s exposure options and features in this course designed for intermediate photographers.

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, January 20, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Learn the fundamentals of drawing the human body through an exploration of the skeleton, planes of motion, gesture, musculature, and other key elements. Virtual anatomy software, a digital figure drawing site, and a variety of props allow students to discover how to convey motion.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, January 20, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the face of the travel industry and the criteria that guides travelers in planning their trips. Television host, writer, and producer Darley Newman shares insider’s tips and recommendations on where to travel in 2022—places that combine culture, cuisine, history, and a healthy dose of wellness and nature.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, January 21, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The Tiber River flows around the famous hills of Rome. Nourishing Rome for centuries, for the ancient Romans the river personified a majestic old man, crowned with laurel and holding a cornucopia. Some of Rome’s greatest monuments are found along its banks. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo leads an art-historical adventure along the Tiber River. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, January 22, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Humans are obviously part of the animal kingdom in many important ways, and yet they exhibit features and activities that set them apart from other species. Philosophy professor Michael Gorman leads a fascinating exploration into the nature of what makes us uniquely human, touching on topics including consciousness, free will, morality, and the duality of body and soul.

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, January 22, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Get the most out of your digital mirrorless or SLR camera by taking part in this workshop, which provides a solid introduction to these cameras’ features and potential.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, January 22, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

Put away your point-and-shoot camera. Learn to make the most of your iPhone’s camera, starting with essential photography basics and moving on to some of the best apps, camera accessories, and low-cost tools for editing and image management.

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, January 22, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Create a personal and powerful record of experiences by drawing and painting moments from your life that you include in your sketchbook.

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, January 22, 2022 - 1:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

Collage is an amazingly versatile art form with no limit when it comes to techniques and materials. In this beginner-level course, learn about tools, adhesives, materials, and appropriate bases for supporting a collage.

Studio Arts Course
Sunday, January 23, 2022 - 10:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. ET

A continued study of watercolor techniques provides the opportunity for greater individual experimentation and expression. Go beyond the basics of paint application, constructing strong, vibrant, personality-filled paintings.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, January 24, 2022 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

This course examines fundamental concepts of composition and their practical application in studio-art practice, offering participants tools to enrich their own work as well to analyze and appreciate visual art in general. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Monday, January 24, 2022 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Learn the basics of weaving handmade bobbin lace, from winding the bobbins to making four small lace projects.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, January 24, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

In an artist-led series designed to provide a tranquil mid-day break, create small but satisfying works of art as a way to hit “pause” and incorporate a bit of creativity into your at-home routines.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, January 24, 2022 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Colored pencil, an often-over-looked dry medium, is coming into its own. Whether used in fine art or illustration, they can enliven work with rich, vibrant color and a dizzying range of effects. Learn basic to intermediate methods and strategies with colored pencils.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, January 24, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

You don’t necessarily need great light to make a great photo. Understand the essentials of night photography and tripods as you learn to manage longer exposure times and exposure modes and compensation, choose the right tripod, work with remote shutter-release triggers, use your camera’s self-timer, and more.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, January 24, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

This introductory course teaches the basic skills needed for drawing. Working with a variety of materials and techniques, including charcoal and pencils, students explore the rendering of geometric forms, volume, and perspective, with an emphasis on personal gesture marks.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, January 24, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The popular 2017 film Dunkirk presented a vivid look the famous evacuation of British forces from France in the spring of 1940. But as he examines the planning and execution of the desperate boatlift and analyzes its overall strategic impact on the continuing war effort, Kevin J. Weddle, a professor of military theory and strategy at the U.S. Army War College, reveals why there’s much more to Dunkirk, and why its lead-up and aftermath are just as exciting as the evacuation itself.

Course
Tuesday, January 25, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can spark creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for five online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on story.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, January 25, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Discover how to “see” abstraction in everyday objects and scenes—and then interpret it in a mosaic in classes that highlight classical mosaic technique and include work-in-progress discussion, lecture, demonstration, and in-class projects.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, January 25, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

In this class, students focus on the fundamentals of drawing birds: physical makeup (face, body, wings, and feet) and nuanced differences that distinguish one species from another.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, January 26, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

This introductory course teaches the basic skills needed for drawing. Working with a variety of materials and techniques, including charcoal and pencils, students explore the rendering of geometric forms, volume, and perspective, with an emphasis on personal gesture marks.

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, January 27, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET

Beginning students as well as experienced painters explore watercolor techniques and learn new approaches to painting through demonstration, discussion, and experimentation.

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, January 27, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Explore the basics of color theory including temperature, value, and harmony-creating color schemes. In three hands-on projects, learn to use a color wheel with tinting and toning, color charts, and color harmony studies.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, January 27, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

There’s no writer quite like Charles Dickens. Author and humanities scholar Clay Jenkinson uses three of his beloved novels as the basis for the serious but playful look at Dickens you’ve always wanted—an exploration of the fabulous and fantastic creativity of a timeless author who could write English prose as if it were iambic pentameter poetry.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, January 29, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Historian Alexander Mikaberidze examines four historical moments crucial in the emergence of France, a country with a uniquely lengthy, dramatic, and varied history. Accept his virtual invitation to the coronation of the greatest of medieval European rulers, to fight alongside King Philippe Auguste as he confronted an English-led coalition of monarchs, to look behind the intrigues at the French royal court, and to follow Parisians as they stormed the parapets of the Bastille.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, January 29, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Use basic stitches to create an embroidered rainbow-watermelon patch to embellish a favorite jacket or pair of jeans. Learn how to prepare fabric with a simple design, then ready a hoop and begin stitching.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, January 31, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Designed for beginners who want to learn how to use their digital or mirrorless camera as a creative tool, students will gain skill in technical aspects of photography so that they can concentrate on composing beautiful images.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, January 31, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Great art is timeless, and speaks to us across time, culture, and space. Yet great works come from real people living real lives. Paul Glenshaw examines Albert Bierstadt’s 1868 work Among the Sierra Nevada, California—a majestic depiction of the natural beauty of the American West that also served as part of a brazen self-marketing scheme, a lure to immigrants and settlers, and a reflection of the complex legacy of Manifest Destiny. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Tuesday, February 1, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can spark creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for five online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on first person.

Course
Tuesday, February 1, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Our modern world echoes and even replicates the creative vestiges of the past—and the key to understanding our surroundings is through an overview of ancient material culture. Focusing on the Mediterranean region, art historian Renee Gondek offers a survey of the earliest traces of artistic production from the Paleolithic period through the late Bronze Age. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, February 2, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Why are William Shakespeare’s plays still considered essential reading? How can lessons from his Elizabethan theatrical universe help us to better understand social and political conflicts we confront today? Explore three of the Bard’s great tragedies to discover why Shakespeare remains vital and relevant.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, February 2, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Experiment with a variety of painting styles such as cubism, suprematism, and abstract expressionism to learn practical applications of the concepts and techniques of modernism. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Thursday, February 3, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Using a medley of filmed performances, documentary filmmaker and cultural historian Sara Lukinson traces how some of our favorite love songs from the American songbook came to be in a 3-session winter series and how re-imaginings by different artists, unexpected arrangements, and changing times transformed them into something more. This session focuses on "Autumn Leaves," "Send in the Clowns," and "This Nearly Was Mine."

Course
Thursday, February 3, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

For centuries, the English monarchy was male, but several notable women shattered that royal glass ceiling. Tudor scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger leads an assumption-challenging survey of female reigns, from the first crowned queen of England to the record-breaking longevity of Elizabeth II, examining how each redefined the role of the ruler and nature of the monarchy.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, February 4, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

From the late Middle Ages to the early Renaissance, the Book of Hours, filled with groups of prayers designed for use by lay people, was more in demand than the Bible itself. Roger S. Wieck, Melvin R. Seiden curator and department head of Medieval and Renaissance manuscripts at the Morgan Library and Museum, explores the textual and pictorial riches to be found within the pages of these fascinating books. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, February 5, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The English painters, poets, and critics who gave birth to the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in 1848 wanted to reform art by rejecting what they called the melodramatic style of High Renaissance artists like Raphael. Art historian Bonita Billman traces this fascinating movement from its origins to flowering conclusion. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, February 5, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET

Art historian and photographer Patricia Howard introduces the world of the photo surrealists and explores how they pushed the boundaries of photographic imagery in the 1920s to 1940s. Create your very own surrealist collage as part of the experience. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Monday, February 7, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Sharpen your knowledge of focus and depth of field through in-class discussion and homework assignments. Gain a better understanding of focus modes, area modes, and hyperfocal distance/focusing. DSLR, mirrorless, and film cameras are welcome.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, February 9, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Brian Rose, a professor emeritus at Fordham University, examines how advertising evolved during television’s first two decades and the important role it played in convincing viewers that the key to happiness quite literally lay in buying their way into the American dream.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 10, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

The Barnes Foundation holds the world’s largest collection of works by Paul Cézanne, some 69 pieces including his masterworks The Large Bathers and The Card Players. Barnes educator Penny Hansen uses high-definition Deep Zoom technology to explore Cézanne’s career, his reclusive life, his style, his characteristic brushstrokes, and his deep influence on 20th-century art. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 10, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Thomas Eakins spent a lifetime on a quest to create the most accurate portrayal of the human figure. Art critic and author Judy Pomeranz examines the life of this exceptional American painter and his impact on the course of art history. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 10, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Why and how do living languages change? The answer, in a word, is fascinating. Linguist and English language historian Anne Curzan leads a lively tour across the language’s shifting landscape, from Beowulf to blogging.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, February 12, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. ET

The state of Oaxaca in Mexico, and its eponymous Spanish colonial capital city, have been important cultural crossroads from pre-Columbian times to the present day. Learn about its rich cultural history, from the domestication of maize corn more than 10,000 years ago to Oaxaca’s emergence as a contemporary international cultural center.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, February 15, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

His unique voice and passionate style made Ray Charles one of the most beloved and influential musicians of our time. Music curator John Edward Hasse of the American History Museum celebrates the music, the man, and his place in our country’s cultural history.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, February 16, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Explore the spectrum of floral design. Sourcing (with a focus on sustainability), making the most of seasonal flowers, creating centerpieces, wiring techniques, bouquet-making, and photographing your work are all among the practical areas covered. 

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, February 16, 2022 - 1:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

Get the most out of your digital mirrorless or SLR camera by taking part in this workshop, which provides a solid introduction to these cameras’ features and potential.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, February 16, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Willa Cather’s visits to Santa Fe in the 1920s with her partner, book editor Edith Lewis, inspired her to research and write the enduring novel she referred to as her best book. Author and historian Garrett Peck examines how the setting and spirit of Death Comes for the Archbishop is rooted in those travels and in their relationship.

Course
Thursday, February 17, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Using a medley of filmed performances, documentary filmmaker and cultural historian Sara Lukinson traces how some of our favorite love songs from the American songbook came to be in a 3-session winter series and how re-imaginings by different artists, unexpected arrangements, and changing times transformed them into something more. This session focuses on "What a Wonderful World" and "Smile."

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, February 19, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

Take your iPhone camera skills to another level in a two-day workshop that focuses on the ProCamera app and editing techniques; organizing, printing, and posting your photos; and a critique session on images.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, February 19, 2022 - 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Learn from an orchid-care expert how orchids grow in their native environments and beginner care instructions to keep your orchids blooming.

Studio Arts Workshop
Sunday, February 20, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Using direct printing and water-based printing inks, create realistic looking schools of fish or a single artistic print simply by inking a whole fish and pressing it to paper.

Studio Arts Workshop
Wednesday, February 23, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Gain an understanding of aspect ratios (digital sensors and film). The class explores changing the aspect ratio in camera, aspect-ratio constraints in cropping and post-production, and use of the Photoshop image size and canvas size commands.

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, February 24, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Learn how to create a photo essay, a set of photographs that tells a story or evokes a series of emotions. Homework assignments are designed to encourage students to explore their own personal interests.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 24, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Some of the most significant American losses and victories of the Revolutionary War took place in South Carolina, where the state’s brand-new Liberty Trail invites travelers to uncover lesser-known sites and fascinating figures related to the period. Emmy Award–nominated PBS television host Darley Newman shares how to get the most out of your exploration of the Liberty Trail, as well as tips about nearby attractions and great local food, drink, lodging, and hotspots along the way.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, February 26, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Biblical scholar and historian Gary Rendsburg presents a fascinating survey of aspects of the Jewish diaspora from the ancient and medieval periods, tracing the histories of communities in Egypt, Babylonia, Russia, Arabia, Italy, and Spain.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, February 26, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Adobe Lightroom is the most useful (and user friendly) software for organizing and editing images, usable for both RAW and JPEG image files. This two-session workshop offers users an overview of the program, with a focus on working with the essential Library and Develop modules for organizing and editing your files.

Studio Arts Workshop
Monday, February 28, 2022 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Learn how to make color choices in your art to bring out a reaction from the viewer. Create combinations with colored pencils that illustrate how color theory works.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, March 2, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

This introductory course teaches the basic skills needed for drawing. Working with a variety of materials and techniques, including charcoal and pencils, students explore the rendering of geometric forms, volume, and perspective, with an emphasis on personal gesture marks.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, March 10, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

In mid-19th-century France, as political, social, and cultural changes swept through Europe, many painters rejected idealized classicism and romanticism, and began painting what they saw around them. The style became known as realism. Art historian Nancy G. Heller examines its evolution, significance, and later influence. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, March 14, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

In 1775, the British Empire’s most valuable colonies in the New World were in the Caribbean. Historian Richard Bell discusses how fearful imperial officials struggled to insulate the British West Indies from the contagion of revolution that was overtaking its colonies on the mainland—and how those attempts ultimately failed.