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Smithsonian Associates - Entertaining, Informative, Eclectic, Insightful

Streaming Programs

Your newest link to our world of learning

Welcome to Smithsonian Associates Streaming, a new digital platform for the high-quality, engaging and varied programs that you’ve come to expect from us.

We invite you to join us from the comfort of your home as we present individual programs, multi-part courses, studio arts classes, and virtual study tours inspired by the Smithsonian’s research, collections and exhibitions. We’re excited to present this new aspect of our 55 years as the world’s largest museum-based educational program—and to have you be an important part of our future growth.

Explore all our offerings in this month's digital program guide.

Studio Arts Course
Sunday, August 1, 2021 - 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. ET

Explore the wide range of colors that nature can yield. In this workshop, learn how to establish a dye studio at home, dive into various dyestuffs and colors, and walk through the process of dyeing fiber with natural materials.

Course
Monday, August 2, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Curator Elizabeth Lay is joined by art historian and collector Samantha Viksnins, who delves deeper into the history of the Hermès Carré, the production process of the limited-edition scarves, and illustrates what sets the Hermès designs apart from those of other luxury scarves. Part of a 3-session Decorative Arts summer series.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, August 2, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Designed for those who have already taken a structured introduction to Lightroom class and are familiar with the Library and Develop modules, this class will help you leverage all of the Library functions.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, August 3, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Media and communications expert Brian Rose surveys the extraordinary landscape of American TV comedy, examining how it has evolved since the 1950s. 

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, August 3, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

The Valois dynasty, which rose to power in France in 1328, is largely overshadowed by their English rivals, the Tudors. Yet, the two centuries of the Valois reign were crucial in the establishment of France as a major European power. Historian Alexander Mikaberidze explores the dynasty’s rise—and fall.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, August 3, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Understanding how to fully utilize your camera’s flash is key for photographers wishing to take their photographic skill to the next level. This class, designed for digital photographers familiar with aperture, shutter speed, ISO and metering in manual mode, offers to do just that.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, August 3, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Historian Sam Lebovic traces the evolution of the Espionage Act to provide a new history of state secrecy today—and how it reveals American democracy’s struggles to balance security and liberty.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, August 3, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Smithsonian curators started collecting Olympic artifacts in earnest in the 1970s and ’80s. Join Kenneth Cohen, a curator at the National Museum of American History, for an engaging discussion about what’s in the Smithsonian’s Olympic collections—and what’s not—as well as a look at how Smithsonian curators might approach the Games this year and beyond.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, August 4, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

In 1940 Adolph Hitler had two choices when it came to the Mediterranean region: Stay out or commit sufficient forces to expel the British from the Middle East. Against his generals’ advice, the Fuhrer committed a major strategic blunder.

Studio Arts Workshop
Wednesday, August 4, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Discover how to quickly capture a variety of subjects with loose lines and painterly colors using instructor Cindy Briggs’ quick sketch watercolors method. This “go with the flow” technique is perfect for studies, travel journals, and finished fine art.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, August 4, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

When a freak accident on board the International Space Station results in an order to return to Earth, astronaut Walli Beckwith refuses to leave her post. Earth is in trouble and she feels she must do something. Join Jeffrey Kluger, author of Apollo 13, in a discussion of his new novel, Holdout, and his career as a science writer with former NASA astronaut Marsha Ivins.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, August 5, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Artists, activists, and radio DJs transformed music into a political weapon and unifying force in the Civil Rights Movement, delivering powerful messages of hope to the Black community and beyond. Historian Leon Burnette explores how the music that grew out of a seminal era became an indelible part of America’s social and cultural heritage.

Studio Arts Workshop
Thursday, August 5, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

If you venture outside the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, you discover a walkway filled with marble statues of Renaissance masters including Michelangelo, da Vinci, and Ravello. Bring a bit of Italy to your artwork as you learn to capture the likeness of a sunlit sculpture in watercolors. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, August 5, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Lena Richard, a Black chef and entrepreneur in New Orleans, built a dynamic culinary career in the segregated South, defying harmful stereotypes of Black women that severely diminished their role in the creation and development of American food culture and its economy.

This program is hosted in collaboration with the Southern Food and Beverage Museum where Lavigne is the Director of Culinary Programming.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, August 6, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The golden period of the Serenissima Republic is reflected in the glorious art generated for its churches, confraternities, and palaces, including works by Bellini, Tintoretto, Tiepolo, and other masters. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo traces the history of this fabled city and the art and architecture created there. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, August 7, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Their scandals became the stuff of legends, but this royal family in just three generations, reshaped the monarchy and changed England, Europe, and the world. Scholar Carol Ann Lloyd Stanger of the Folger Shakespeare Library leads a look behind the Tudors’ carefully contrived image of monarchy.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, August 7, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Get the most out of your digital mirrorless or SLR camera by taking part in this workshop, which provides a solid introduction to these cameras’ features and potential.

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, August 7, 2021 - 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Center yourself through the calm flow of the rhythmic motion of hand stitching. Create a therapeutic textile panel using a hand needle and materials you have at home, which can include vintage family textiles such as table napkins to add a connection to warm personal memories.

Course
Monday, August 9, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

From colossal Olmec heads to the paintings of Frida Kahlo, Aztec temples to Mexican murals, this survey of Latin American art sweeps through the centuries. Join art historian Michele Greet, who traces the significant creators and trends that defined and shaped the arts of Latin America from their earliest expressions through the 19th and 20th centuries. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Course
Tuesday, August 10, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Paul Glenshaw reprises four of his most popular programs from his daytime series Art + History, in which he examines great works of art in their historical context. As he explores seminal works by John Singleton Copley, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Edouard Manet, and Auguste Rodin he brings the world of the art and its creator to vivid life. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit) This session focuses on The Shaw Memorial by Augustus Saint Gaudens.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, August 11, 2021 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Learn the basics of bobbin lacemaking, from winding the bobbins to making four small lace projects, in this introductory class. Colored threads are used to make it easier to see what is happening.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, August 11, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Learn how to take great photographs of architecture and public art. Class discussions include techniques and camera settings for cityscapes, individual buildings, architectural details, contemporary public art, monuments and memorials, and more. 

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, August 11, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Over more than a century, three generations of Wyeths have created a collective portrait of America. Art historian Bonita Billman traces the family tradition reflected in their disparate subjects and styles. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, August 11, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

This introductory course teaches the basic skills needed for drawing. Working with a variety of materials and techniques, including charcoal and pencils, students explore the rendering of geometric forms, volume, and perspective, with an emphasis on personal gesture marks.

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, August 12, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Go beyond taking random photographs and develop a cohesive body of work that is uniquely yours. Review some contemporary photographers’ work and define the characteristics that are incorporated into their portfolios.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, August 12, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger explores how London served as a backdrop and inspiration for William Shakespeare. She reveals how he was inspired by the humanity he observed in the city to create the unforgettable worlds of his plays.

Members-Only Program
Friday, August 13, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

In this members-only series led by veteran arts educator Roberta Gasbarre, go behind the scenes and into the working lives of some of the most intriguing people from all across the Smithsonian and Washington’s worlds of culture, science, and education. This program features Christopher Wilson, Director of Visitor Design at the National Museum of American History.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, August 13, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Spend a fascinating Friday evening expanding your knowledge of the world of wine as you sip along with sommelier Erik Segelbaum in a series of delectable adventures. This immersive program showcases Portuguese wines and includes a curated personal tasting kit to enhance the experience.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, August 14, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The famous breaking of the Mayan code in the late 20th century revolutionized the study of these peoples and of ancient America. Humanities scholar George Scheper examines how interdisciplinary study of the Maya extends beyond the traditional archaeological focus to comprise political and social history, art, comparative religion, and ecology.

Course
Monday, August 16, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Curator Elizabeth Lay is joined by the daughter of the owner of Mae's Millinary shop known for its stunning "showstopper" hats, Donna Limerick, who discusses her mother’s entrepreneurial spirit, her memories of working in the shop, and shares cherished family photographs of “showstopper” hat images to view and enjoy.  She also talks about her experience working with the curators at NMAAHC to create the exhibition dedicated to her mother and her shop. Part of a 3-session Decorative Arts summer series.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, August 16, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

During the harsh winter of 1777 when the Continental Army was camped at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, Gen. George Washington initiated a new set of drills and regimental regulations that helped to turn a rag-tag collection of enlistees into a professional fighting force. Historian Richard Bell tells the Valley Forge story through the perspective of Baron Friedrich von Steuben, an immigrant who trained the troops as he dealt with anti-German sentiments and rumors about his sexuality.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, August 17, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. ET

“How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.” With these words, Elizabeth Barrett Browning has come down to us as a romantic heroine, a recluse controlled by a domineering father and often overshadowed by her husband, Robert Browning. But she defied cultural constraints—a modern figure whose life is a study in self-invention. Writer and poet Fiona Sampson presents a nuanced, comprehensive portrait of Britain’s most famous female poet.

Studio Arts Workshop
Friday, August 20, 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

For generations, Palestinian women have gathered with their daughters to work collectively on embroidery projects, bonding with one another over a cup of tea. Guided by Wafa Ghnaim, who began her training in embroidery with her mother at age 2, learn the basic Palestinian cross-stitch and how to create a tatreez sampler, using Aida cloth fabric. Motif Focus: Flowers, Ramallah Region

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, August 21, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Whether you’re a beginner or an expert, you’ll be solving puzzles faster and more accurately after this intensive and fun seminar led by crossword editor for Newsday Stanley Newman.

Course
Monday, August 23, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Join Author Michael Gorra in an exploration of works by William Faulkner, one of the greatest—and most problematic—figures in American literature. This session focuses on Light in August.

Course
Tuesday, August 24, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Paul Glenshaw reprises four of his most popular programs from his daytime series Art + History, in which he examines great works of art in their historical context. As he explores seminal works by John Singleton Copley, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Edouard Manet, and Auguste Rodin he brings the world of the art and its creator to vivid life. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit) This session focuses on The Railway by Edouard Manet.

Studio Arts Workshop
Tuesday, August 24, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Like the myriad of small pieces of colored stone, tile, and glass that make up a mosaic, the Washington, DC area contains a surprising number of works that together provide a picture of the styles and techniques that mark an art form that’s been practiced since ancient times. Join mosaic artist Bonnie Fitzgerald for a virtual tour of a wide variety of local mosaic treasures at notable public sites, contemporary spaces, and federal and private buildings. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, August 26, 2021 - 7:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

From the last years of the 19th century throughout much of the following one, Los Angeles evolved from a destination for health seekers and winter vacations to a dynamic center of industry and the leading port of the Western United States. Bill Keene draws on booster literature, magazine articles, and scholarly and informal histories to examine how LA’s vision of itself became a reality.

Studio Arts Workshop
Friday, August 27, 2021 - 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

Nothing can be more frustrating than realizing there’s something wrong with your knitting, and not knowing how to fix it. This workshop focuses on avoiding errors, learning to detect them sooner, and what to do once you know there’s a problem.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, August 27, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in the Early Renaissance, examines the style, iconography, and history of The Last Judgment and the influence that it had on later artists. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, August 28, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Use colorful Akua water-based printmaking ink to create evocative spring-themed prints on fabric.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, August 28, 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

In their native environments, most common orchids grow above the soil attached to trees or rocks. Discover the unique attributes of orchids that allow them to grow this way. 

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, August 29, 2021 - 5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. ET

Join volcanologist Kirt Kempter as he focuses on the geologic origins of Copper Canyon and the Sierra Madre Occidental.

Course
Tuesday, August 31, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Paul Glenshaw reprises four of his most popular programs from his daytime series Art + History, in which he examines great works of art in their historical context. As he explores seminal works by John Singleton Copley, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Edouard Manet, and Auguste Rodin he brings the world of the art and its creator to vivid life. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit) This session focuses on The Burghers of Calais by Auguste Rodin.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Hummingbirds have captured our imaginations with their unsurpassed jewel-like plumage, acrobatic flight, and ethereal presence. Nature writer Jon Dunn recalls his adventures following hummingbirds from Alaska to the tip of South America.

Studio Arts Workshop
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Learn how to create a photo essay, a set of photographs that tell a story or evoke a series of emotions. Homework assignments are designed to encourage students to explore their own personal interests.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

How did American transform from a country that relied on a relatively wholesome and nourishing food system to one in which the daily diet is laden with fats, sugar, and ultra-processed unhealthy foods? Historian Allen Pietrobon traces the changes in American cuisine since the end of WWII, highlighting key events that radically changed how and what Americans eat.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, September 2, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

For more than seven decades, Carl Reiner and Mel Brooks made America laugh—either through their remarkable solo careers or their legendary partnership. Discover the extraordinary comic talents of these giants of American comedy who conquered every medium they took on: television, films, Broadway, recordings.

Studio Arts Course
Friday, September 3, 2021 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Composition is one of the most important of elements of any artwork. This workshop examines fundamental concepts of composition and their practical application in studio-art practice. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit) 

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, September 7, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

In 1932 Frank Lloyd Wright published The Disappearing City, a polemic about the evils of urban centers. He envisioned a better future centered on the automobile, telephone and radio, and mass production, integrated to bring mobility, freedom, and choice to the individual. In a richly illustrated program, Bill Keene examines the apparent contradictions between Wright’s essentially anti-city views and his ongoing fascination with work to enhance urban life. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, September 8, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

In a recital with commentary, popular speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin serves as tour guide to the England that Haydn, Mozart, Mendelssohn, Liszt, and Chopin experienced. Through delightful music plus contemporary letters and newspaper articles, she follows the musical travelers as they hobnob with royalty, dazzle the critics, complain about the weather, and admire the ladies.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, September 8, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

The House of Bourbon remains one of the most historically important European royal houses. The Bourbons came to prominence in the 16th century when they first became the rulers of Navarre, in Spain, and later of France proper. Historian Alexander Mikaberidze explores their rise to power—and the root causes of their fall.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, September 8, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Twentieth-century American artist Jacob Lawrence’s depictions of Black life memorialized many significant events and figures of African American history. The emphasis on narrative in his work has deflected from a consideration of the artist’s deep engagement with form. Art historian Jordana Moore Saggese examines the career of Lawrence in terms of his formal innovations, repositioning this work within the avant-garde.  (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, September 9, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The National Archaeology Museum in Naples is one of the most spectacular showcases of antiquities in the world, with treasures from Pompeii, Herculaneum, and their sister towns and villas. Join art historian and tour guide Laura R. Weinstein live from Rome as she highlights some of the most fascinating collections of this visit-worthy cultural gem in Naples. (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, September 9, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Historian Richard Bell examines Paine’s meteoric rise to celebrity status during the American Revolution and his equally dramatic fall from grace. Once lionized as our most relatable and revolutionary founding father, according to Bell, Paine died a pariah, too radical for the cautious new country he had helped call into being.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, September 10, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Florence’s imposing Pitti Palace was chosen by Cosimo I de’ Medici and his wife Eleanor of Toledo as the grand ducal residence in 1549 and it soon became the new symbol of the Medicis’ power over Tuscany. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo leads a virtual visit to the Pitti Palace, where she highlights a selection of painting masterpieces, discusses the extraordinary objets d'art, and leads a stroll through the Boboli Gardens. (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1/2 credit)

Members-Only Program
Friday, September 10, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

In this members-only series led by veteran arts educator Roberta Gasbarre, go behind the scenes and into the working lives of some of the most intriguing people from all across the Smithsonian and Washington’s worlds of culture, science, and education. This program features Felix Contreras, co-creator and host of Alt.Latino, NPR's pioneering radio show and podcast celebrating Latin alternative music and world Latino culture.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, September 10, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Food markets and food halls are a hot culinary trend right now, but Baltimore is home to the nation’s oldest continuously operating public market system, one that draws on the harvest of Marlyand farms and the Chesapeake Bay. Christine Rai explores each of the city’s markets, delving into their history, architecture, and evolution, as well as stories of the city’s traditional produce vendors, the arabbers and their iconic horse-drawn carts.

Studio Arts Course
Friday, September 10, 2021 - 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

It takes a village! In this workshop, students construct their own tiny houses, which they personalize working in paper-mache, acrylics, and mixed media.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, September 11, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Delightful and detailed prints on paper can be made using real fish. Using direct printing and water-based printing inks, create realistic looking schools of fish or a single artistic print simply by inking a whole fish and pressing it to paper.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, September 11, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

The Civil War was the largest slave revolt in world history—and a war for freedom that hurled American history off its rails. It would end with the destruction of American slavery and the passage of the 13th Amendment. Historian Richard Bell explores the antislavery fight, focusing on the people whose courage and personal struggle led to the final victory.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, September 11, 2021 - 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

In this workshop, beginners are introduced to surface freestyle hand embroidery. In this style, the stitches are applied freely, disregarding the weave or structure of the ground cloth. Students learn how to select and prepare fabric using a simple design, ready their hoop, and begin stitching.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, September 11, 2021 - 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

Inspired by the 6-Word Memoir project, learn to capture quick images of personal stories in quilted wall-hangings. Fusing allows students to appliqué shapes quickly, while embroidered details emphasize essential ideas.

Studio Arts Course
Sunday, September 12, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Bead weaving offers an endless possibility of stitches, designs, and color combinations to explore and create. The class focuses on how to start and finish wearable pieces, create patterns, and choose bead colors and finishes.

Studio Arts Workshop
Sunday, September 12, 2021 - 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. ET

Natural dyes are all around us: fields of wildflowers, tree- and flower-lined city streets; our own kitchen composts. Students learn where to find natural in-season dyestuff sources in the Mid-Atlantic area, how to extract dye, and how to prepare and dye fabric. 

Studio Arts Workshop
Sunday, September 12, 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Your orchids are thriving and blooming. If you’re wondering what’s next in your orchid adventure, this class is for you. Learn about the conditions necessary to raise vigorous, healthy orchids for shows—and tips on transporting competition-ready orchids.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, September 13, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Some moments in movies never leave us: the piercing eyes of a private eye, a raft hurtling down the rapids, that little black dress, the close-up of a fading movie star. In a 5-session film discussion series, documentary filmmaker and writer Sara Lukinson revisits some of our favorite movies and characters, setting them against the backdrop of their times, the people who dreamed them up, and the America they reflected—or asked us to imagine. This session focuses on Katharine Hepburn and Elizabeth Taylor.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, September 13, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Learn the rules of bookmaking…then get creative and break them!  Each week, make different kinds of books, including an accordion book, Japanese stab bound journal, and a travel journal with sewn in pages. 

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, September 13, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Join Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger on a journey to Regency England as seen through the eyes of Jane Austen and her novels.  She provides fans of Austen added insight into the characters and their lives, and aficionados of history with the details and dramas that made this one of the most fascinating eras in English history.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, September 13, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

This class plumbs the depths of creative inspiration, focusing on harnessing ideas and starting points for making art. It incorporates discussion, visual aids, and exercises to engage the senses in the act of design. Writing, drawing, painting, collage and other techniques will be used to create pieces of art to express individual creative ideas.

Studio Arts Workshop
Monday, September 13, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

You don’t necessarily need great light to make a great photo. Understand the essential basics of night photography and tripods as you learn to manage longer exposure times (up to 30 seconds) and exposure modes and compensation; choose the right tripod style; work with wired or wireless remote shutter-release triggers; use the self-timer; and more.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, September 13, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

In the wake of the January 6 siege on the Capitol, bitter political divisiveness, anger, and irrational thinking continue to roil the United States, inhibiting the possibility of logical debate. Enlightenment scholar Seth David Radwell proposes a plan to begin the process of repair and reconciliation: a new dialogue between all thoughtful Americans, informed by our country’s history.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, September 14, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Over the centuries, Notre Dame Cathedral has survived myriad threats to its survival, emerging as a resilient yet vulnerable symbol of the historical and cultural legacy of Paris and all of France. Art historian Judy Scott Feldman surveys the cathedral’s history and the ongoing restoration and historic preservation efforts to return the cathedral to its condition before the devastating April 2019 blaze. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, September 14, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

In a return to old-school photography, this class focuses on a wide range of topics, from 35mm and “toy” film cameras;  film developing theory and chemicals; evaluating negatives; negative storage and scanning basics; condenser vs. diffuser enlargers; print storage and scanning basics; and plenty more.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, September 14, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Custer, Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse, Sheridan, Bloody Nose, Reno: The Battle of the Little Bighorn is one of the central episodes of the frontier era of American history, and an event on which new points of view regularly emerge. Humanities scholar Clay Jenkinson, who has spent his life in Sitting Bull and Custer country, brings his perspectives on the conflict to an insightful exploration of the most iconic event in the Plains Indian Wars.

Course
Wednesday, September 15, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

In this introductory course, music educator and conductor Ernest Johnson offers the perfect opportunities to gain or expand your knowledge of music theory, the essential language and elements of musical notation and composition for singers or instrumentalists.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, September 17, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

The Barnes is often considered the greatest post-impressionist and early-modern art collection in the world. Join Barnes Foundation educator Penny Hansen as she covers its history and uses unique high-definition Deep Zoom technology to offer closeup looks masterpiece that reveal their surfaces and details in ways that bring the art and the artists to vivid life. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Workshop
Friday, September 17, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Circular weaving is fun technique for new weavers as well as experienced fiber artists. Learn how to warp and weave on several sizes of circle looms as you explore plain weave as well as twinning, soumak, ray knots, and loops.

Studio Arts Workshop
Friday, September 17, 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

For generations, Palestinian women have gathered with their daughters to work collectively on embroidery projects, bonding with one another over a cup of tea. Guided by Wafa Ghnaim, who began her training in embroidery with her mother at age 2, learn the basic Palestinian cross-stitch and how to create a tatreez sampler, using Aida cloth fabric. Motif Focus: Carnations, Bersheba Region

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, September 17, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Spend a fascinating Friday evening expanding your knowledge of the world of wine as you sip along with sommelier Erik Segelbaum in a series of delectable adventures. This immersive program showcases South American wines and includes a curated personal tasting kit to enhance the experience.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, September 18, 2021 - 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

The final task in making a quilt is finishing the raw edges, yet this important step is often an afterthought. A quilt’s finished edge often make a difference in the piece’s overall impact. Learn how to use self-binding or applied bindings, facings, and overstitching to apply the edge.

Course
Monday, September 20, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Art historian Nancy G. Heller focuses on a quartet of Spain’s most significant painters—unearthing their sources, analyzing their principal works, discussing the critical receptions of their pictures, and demonstrating their influences on later generations of visual artists, both within and beyond the borders of Spain. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, September 20, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Christopher Hamner, a professor of history at George Mason University, explores the most destructive battle ever fought in North America, from the beginning of Lee’s invasion in early June through the climactic fighting in central Pennsylvania to the Confederate retreat in July.

Studio Arts Workshop
Monday, September 20, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Take command of your photographic vision as you learn the basics of your camera’s exposure functions. Learn to control the properties of your images through the understanding of apertures, shutter speeds, depth of field, shutter motion effects, equivalent exposures, and using exposure modes (program, aperture priority, shutter priority, and manual).

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, September 20, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Join geologist Kirt Kempter for an exploration of the splendid scenery and geology of the northern Rocky Mountains that straddle the border between the United States and Canada. From the emerald Lake Louise near Banff to the majestic views along Going-to-the-Sun Road at Glacier, a deep geologic history created these spectacular park landscapes, which are now designated as World Heritage Sites. 

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, September 21, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Pulitzer Prize-winning author and columnist George F. Will casts a careful eye on what defines the American experience as he explores an array of topics including drug policy and the criminal justice system; the First Amendment; meritocracy and education; Frank Sinatra, Bob Dylan, and The Beach Boys; and, yes, the morality of enjoying football.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, September 21, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

With a story that ranges from Louis Armstrong to Wynton Marsalis, educators and documentary filmmakers Darroch Greer and Paul Glenshaw share great moments, characters, and incredible music from the ongoing love affair between Paris and jazz.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, September 21, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

The Korean Peninsula is arguably one of the most perplexing and paradoxical places on the planet. Today, South Korea conjures up images of a dynamic, vibrant, and modern country. North Korea evokes images of an archaic, desperately poor, and unstable society. Explore Korea’s unique culture and long history—and how this tiny corner at the northeastern tip of Asia will likely play a pivotal global role in the 21st century.

Studio Arts Workshop
Wednesday, September 22, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

The American West’s beautiful landscapes are best appreciated beneath expansive dark skies. Using watercolor, learn how to capture light and shadow in a nighttime scene, work with gouache to create highlights and stars, and mix colors to portray the region’s unique red-rock landscapes.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, September 22, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Lady Bird Johnson’s complex and captivating role—as a political partner to her husband, as a vital yet underappreciated presence in the White House, and as a critical advisor and strategist—is revealed in Julia Sweig’s new biography of the first lady. The story is told in Lady Bird’s own words through the largely unknown audio diaries that she kept during her five-plus years as first lady.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, September 22, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

NASA’s long-awaited Hubble Space Telescope successor will complement and extend the discoveries of the Hubble Space Telescope, with a greatly improved sensitivity that enables it to look much closer to the beginning of time and for the unobserved formation of the first galaxies. Astrophysicist John Mather reviews Webb’s development, capabilities, and planned observing program.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, September 23, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Learn about Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, located along the Appalachian flyway in eastern Pennsylvania. Founded in 1934 as the world’s first sanctuary for raptors, Hawk Mountain’s 2,500 acres of land are dedicated to conservation and connected to an important migratory pathway that thousands of birds pass through daily in peak fall migration.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, September 23, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

The thought of Thomas Aquinas (1225–1274) presents one of Western civilization’s most comprehensive philosophical systems. Although a theologian by profession, this man of faith dedicated much of his vast writings to discerning what the human mind can learn independently of faith. Aquinas scholar Gregory T. Doolan explores Aquinas’s philosophical thought.

Course
Thursday, September 23, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Join Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of history at American University, for in-depth looks at four UNESCO World Heritage sites that have been profoundly affected by nearby volcanoes, from Pompeii to Virunga National Park. Each lavishly illustrated program goes far beyond the typical tourist experience, incorporating insights drawn from current scholarship and research. This session focuses on Herculaneum and Pompeii.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, September 24, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

With the Ducal Palace providing the splendid backdrop, Urbino’s became the ideal princely court among the most illustrious of Europe, providing patronage to such artists as Raphael and Titian. Return to the 15th century with art historian Elaine Ruffolo to experience a Renaissance court in all its glory. (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, September 24, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

In the last 20 years, scientists around the world have uncovered new fossils that have drastically rewritten the story of mammal evolution as we knew it. Paleontologist Elsa Panciroli goes back hundreds of million years as she discusses the emergence of the extraordinary lineage to which we belong, called Synapsida, from their murky split from a shared ancestor with reptiles at the dawn of life on land.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, September 25, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

Something about Baltimore clearly nurtures the literary impulse, but what is it, exactly? Arts journalist and Charm City resident Richard Selden explores the reasons as he takes a look at the sites and works closely connected with the most famous writers who lived there.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, September 25, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

Put away your point-and-shoot camera and pull out your iPhone to create great images. Learn to make the most of your phone’s camera, starting with photography basics such as essential compositional skills and exposure, then moving on to an exploration of some of the best apps, camera accessories, and low-cost tools for editing and image management.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, September 27, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Some moments in movies never leave us: the piercing eyes of a private eye, a raft hurtling down the rapids, that little black dress, the close-up of a fading movie star. In a 5-session film discussion series, documentary filmmaker and writer Sara Lukinson revisits some of our favorite movies and characters, setting them against the backdrop of their times, the people who dreamed them up, and the America they reflected—or asked us to imagine. This session focuses on Humphrey Bogart and Paul Newman.

Course
Monday, September 27, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay and her expert guests for an image-rich lunchtime lecture series focusing on fascinating decorative arts and design topics. This session explores what our collections tell us about our time, our values, and ourselves. Part of a 3-session Decorative Arts fall series.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, September 27, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Radiologist Cullen Ruff explores the history of medical imaging, from the discovery of X-rays that revolutionized medicine, to newer modalities such as nuclear medicine, computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging.

Course
Monday, September 27, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Join Author Michael Gorra in an exploration of works by William Faulkner, one of the greatest—and most problematic—figures in American literature. This session focuses on Absalom, Absalom!

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, September 28, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Volcanic activity occurs in almost every corner of the solar system, even in the most unexpected of locations. Geologist and cosmochemist Natalie Starkey guides a fascinating exploration of the tallest, coldest, hottest, and most unusual volcanoes and their origins.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, September 28, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Frank Lloyd Wright’s residence for Buffalo businessman Darwin D. Martin is one of the most substantial and highly developed of his Prairie-style houses and among the architect’s most significant early commissions. Mary Roberts, executive director of the Martin House, leads a live virtual tour through sections of the main house, the open-air pergola, and conservatory as she shares the fascinating history of the site.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, September 28, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Plat du Jour, French for dish of the day, is announced on chalkboards displayed in front of France’s restaurants, cafes, brasseries, and bistros. Cooking teacher, author and journalist Susan Herrmann Loomis highlights this iconic part of a set menu.  Virtually enter her Parisian kitchen as she shares what the cook needs to know to make a delicious plat du jour.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, September 29, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

From the earliest administrations to today, presidents have recognized the important function wine plays in entertaining at the White House. In an illustrated conversation, Fred Ryan, Jr., author of Wine and the White House: A History, is joined by Smithsonian Distinguished Scholar Richard Kurin for an informative and entertaining evening perfect for devotees of presidential history, lovers of wine, or both.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, September 29, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Folklorists Sara Cleto and Brittany Warman share the surprising history of Grimms Fairytales, and how these tales—too often dismissed as simple children's stories—have profoundly shaped Western culture.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, September 30, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

He went from bobby-soxers’ dreamboat to the Chairman of the Board—and he did it his way. Music historian John Edward Hasse toasts the unmistakable voice that defined Sinatra’s stardom.

Course
Thursday, September 30, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Join Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of history at American University, for in-depth looks at four UNESCO World Heritage sites that have been profoundly affected by nearby volcanoes, from Pompeii to Virunga National Park. Each lavishly illustrated program goes far beyond the typical tourist experience, incorporating insights drawn from current scholarship and research. This session focuses on Thingvellir.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, September 30, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

In Stir-Frying to the Sky’s Edge, culinary historian and award-winning cookbook author Grace Young writes of how for centuries the Chinese carried their woks and stir-frying techniques around the globe. In America, beginning around the late-19th century, Chinese immigrants struggled to establish themselves in cities and small towns—from San Francisco to the Mississippi Delta—while contending as well with poverty, discrimination, and to this day, anti-Asian bias.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, October 1, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Springtime in Washington is legendary, but what about that other fabulous season, fall? Join author and tree expert Melanie Choukas-Bradley on a virtual tour through autumn in the capital and see why its beauty should be as celebrated as spring’s cherry blossoms.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, October 2, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Aristotle’s The Nicomachean Ethics is one of the most influential works on human happiness ever written. Philosophy scholar Michael Gorman examines this seminal treatise on practical wisdom and its lasting influence on Western thinking about living one’s best life ethically.

Course
Sunday, October 3, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. ET

The notion that a picture is worth a thousand words is meant to convey the power of imagery. But what of the power of words—if they are Hemingway’s musings on a work of art, Van Gogh’s personal letters, or Michelangelo’s thoughts on his life and art expressed in his poetry? Explore the alchemy that occurs at the intersection of art and literature with David Gariff,  senior lecturer at the National Gallery of Art.  This session focuses on Van Gogh: Artist and Writer. (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, October 4, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Some moments in movies never leave us: the piercing eyes of a private eye, a raft hurtling down the rapids, that little black dress, the close-up of a fading movie star. In a 5-session film discussion series, documentary filmmaker and writer Sara Lukinson revisits some of our favorite movies and characters, setting them against the backdrop of their times, the people who dreamed them up, and the America they reflected—or asked us to imagine. This session focuses on Breakfast at Tiffany’s and Charade.

Course
Monday, October 4, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay and her expert guests for an image-rich lunchtime lecture series focusing on fascinating decorative arts and design topics. This session explores how to spot the originals and the knockoffs among classic mid-century modern furniture pieces. Part of a 3-session Decorative Arts fall series.

Course
Tuesday, October 5, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

In an advanced series, music educator and conductor Ernest Johnson offers a more detailed analysis of melody and harmony and weekly assignments in ear-training, sight-reading, composition, and musical dictation.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, October 5, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Can a Renaissance feast tell us about perspective in painting? Drawing on his new book The Hungry Eye, Leonard Barkan, a professor of comparative literature at Princeton University, explores the central role of food and drink in literature, art, philosophy, religion, and statecraft from antiquity to the Renaissance.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, October 5, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

When Hernando Cortés and his company of conquistadores landed near present-day Veracruz, Mexico, in April of 1519, he kept hearing “Motecuhzoma, Motecuhzoma, Motecuhzoma.” This was Motecuhzoma Xocoyotzin, king of the Mexica and emperor of the powerful Aztec empire. Anthropologist Frances F. Berdan examines some of the most interesting (and often misunderstood) aspects of Aztec life.

Course
Wednesday, October 6, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Documentary filmmaker and writer Sara Lukinson looks at three remarkable memoirs, as different in approach and style as the lives they led. In this session, discuss Born a Crime by comic Trevor Noah who recounts his childhood in apartheid South Africa.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, October 6, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The official and personal residences of Queen Elizabeth II scattered through the United Kingdom are magnificent living palaces, estates, and castles that are used daily to serve the needs of the royal family. Join monarchy expert Andrew Lannerd to explore the vibrant history of each of these famed residences in detail, including behind-the-scenes accounts of events such as a royal wedding at Windsor Castle and a private party that celebrated the queen’s 80th birthday.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, October 6, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

There’s no mystery why the fame of Sherlock Holmes now stretches into a third century or why Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is firmly established as one of the most popular and best-loved writers of all time. Writer Daniel Stashower, author of Teller of Tales: The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle, and actor Scott Sedar investigate the life and works of the legendary sleuth of Baker Street and his creator.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, October 7, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover the power of reflective writing guided by the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, Mary Hall Surface. Inspired by works of art by Hudson River landscape painter Jasper Francis Cropse and poetry by Mary Oliver, explore the lessons that the season of autumn offers us when we slow down, look closely, and reflect.

Course
Thursday, October 7, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Join popular speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin for a fascinating exploration into the intimate relationship between the visible and invisible arts, and how music can literally bind the arts together in this fall series. This session focuses on Marc Chagall and opera. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Thursday, October 7, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Join Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of history at American University, for in-depth looks at four UNESCO World Heritage sites that have been profoundly affected by nearby volcanoes, from Pompeii to Virunga National Park. Each lavishly illustrated program goes far beyond the typical tourist experience, incorporating insights drawn from current scholarship and research. This session focuses on Mount Fuji.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, October 7, 2021 - 8:00 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. ET

Award-winning actor and food obsessive Stanley Tucci grew up in an Italian American family that spent every night around the kitchen table. Join him for a big night as he discusses his favorite food memories; his recent series for CNN; his new book, Taste: My Life Through Food; and what he’s most looking forward to in the future of food. Mangia!

Course
Friday, October 8, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Environmental historian Hayden Mathews brings the heritage of one of the most storied rivers in North American to life in a three-part series that focuses on how the Potomac has shaped the lives of the those who settled along its banks from their arrival after the last Ice Age to the present day and how those lives have had an impact on the river.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, October 8, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Ambitious, extravagant, progressive, and oftentimes sexually notorious, the Sforza family took over the ducal throne of Milan in 1450, ushering in a period of unprecedented peace and prosperity. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo reveals how Milan and its rulers exemplified the political, cultural, religious, and economic aspirations of Renaissance Italy. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, October 12, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Whether you are traveling, exploring, or just adventuring through your daily life, draw the things that are important to you and start noticing the small details around you. Learn to create illustrated art journals on paper, with drawings in pen and watercolors.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, October 12, 2021 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Popular theory on right-side brain activity holds that the right brain is primarily responsible for the intuitive understanding of visual and spatial relationships. Designed to improve the way people see and record objects on paper, a set of visual exercises helps build the ability to draw. If you doubt your artistic ability or were told as a child that you could not draw, this is your opportunity to challenge that perception.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, October 12, 2021 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Whether you want to work in digital or film, this course offers a solid foundation for new photographers ready to learn the basics. Topics include camera functions, exposure, metering, working with natural and artificial light, and composition.

Course
Tuesday, October 12, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Powerful, thrilling, epic, and eloquent, choral music embodies a glorious musical tradition. Saul Lilienstein leads an insightful survey of great works and their composers from the Renaissance through the 20th century.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, October 12, 2021 - 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Say goodbye to flat and boring painting as you learn to create patterns of light and dark in watercolor. Through demonstrations and hands-on exercises, you’ll gain confidence in creating these contrasting elements which add magic, excitement, and drama to your work. 

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, October 12, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on experimentation introduce the medium of oils. Working from museum masterpieces, still-life arrangements or your own favorite photos, explore basic painting techniques, including color-mixing, scumbling, and glazing to gain the technical background and experience you need to get started as a painter.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, October 12, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Whether you work digitally or in film, this course is ideal for students who are familiar with their cameras but are interested in expanding their understanding of photography fundamentals. Sessions focus on lighting, composition, shooting techniques, and gear, and photo-editing software is also discussed. 

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, October 12, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Learn to see like a scientist as you use watercolor and ink to illustrate specimens from nature. Gain confidence in observing form while documenting and interpreting what you see.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, October 12, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Create a beautiful flower inspired by nature in the mosaic material of your choice. Sessions led by Bonnie Fitzgerald focus on principals of color, tone, perspective, classical and contemporary cutting techniques, and styles.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, October 12, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

The Patagonia region of South America has long attracted naturalists and explorers to unravel the mysteries of its dramatic landscape. Join geologist Kirt Kempter on a virtual tour of the region including highlights such as national parks, glaciers, and several picturesque volcanoes of the southern Andes.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, October 13, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

Photographers who want better picture quality and more control of the process are moving away from their phones to either digital SLRs or mirrorless cameras. Both provide a full range of ISO, shutter, and aperture controls, which makes the process of taking pictures much more interesting, and provides results that are clearer, sharper, and enriched with more delicate tones and colors. Learning to use an SLR or mirrorless camera is not complicated.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, October 13, 2021 - 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

Log Cabin quilts—popular in the United States since the Civil War—are made of arrangements of a repeated single block pattern consisting of hand-pieced strips of fabric around a central square. Explore color and value contrast using this simple and familiar pieced block as a framework for spontaneous piecing—and be open to not knowing exactly how the finished piece will turn out!

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, October 13, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Join floral artist Arrin Sutliff to explore the spectrum of floral design. Sourcing (with a focus on sustainability), making the most of seasonal flowers, creating centerpieces, wiring techniques, bouquet-making, and photographing your work are all among the practical areas covered. 

Course
Wednesday, October 13, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

The radical innovations made by European and American painters and sculptors between 1900 and 1960 forever altered the way we think about visual art. In a richly illustrated course, art historian Nancy G. Heller discusses major works by the period’s seminal painters and sculptors, emphasizing their broader socio-political and aesthetic contexts. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, October 13, 2021 - 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

Get a grounding in the basics of this exciting medium in a course that will have you painting in vibrant new colors—and perhaps developing ideas for your other works. Group technique demonstrations and one-on-one instruction are part of the class, which welcomes both beginners and seasoned artists.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, October 13, 2021 - 1:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

In this course, students are introduced to the materials, tools, and technologies used in collage and assemblage. They find inspiration in artists who worked in collage including Joseph Cornell, Romare Bearden, and Gertrude Green, whose works are held in Smithsonian collections. Students express their observations by developing their own collage, mixed-media, or assemblage projects.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, October 13, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

This workshop is designed for students interested in sharpening their figure drawing skills by focusing on the most challenging and expressive details of the human figure. Working from photographs, students employ both wet and dry media to experiment with line, modeling, foreshortening, structure, expression, and varied rates of drawing.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, October 13, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. ET

From day one of the Covid pandemic, Anthony Fauci has been front and center in the fight to destroy the virus. Now, as the crisis begins to ease, the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases helps us understand—from a scientific viewpoint—where we have been and what the post-pandemic world will look like.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, October 13, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Whether you want to work in digital or film, this course offers a solid foundation for new photographers ready to learn the basics. Topics include camera functions, exposure, metering, working with natural and artificial light, and composition.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, October 13, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Try new techniques as you have fun creating papers for collage and other art projects. Create a glorious collection of one-of-a-kind papers accented by acrylic, inks, stamps, and other printmaking materials.

Studio Arts Workshop
Wednesday, October 13, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

This workshop is a comprehensive introduction to all aspects of exposure, and how to manipulate each element to positively affect your histogram. Topics covered include in-camera exposure meters, exposure compensation, and ISO/film speed.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, October 13, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

With an emphasis on imagery from the natural world, explore the possibilities of collage: a highly versatile and accessible art technique that results in the playful combination of various and sometimes-unlikely materials.  Learn to sketch animals and objects found in nature, then combine your drawings with painting and additional elements and textures to create whimsical or serious mixed-media art.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, October 13, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Historian Alexander Mikaberidze breaks with the traditional focus on Napoleon and instead explores his remarkable family which produced two emperors and three kings, not to mention princes, poets, neurotics, heroes of the French Résistance, and even the founder of the FBI.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, October 14, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Albert Barnes amassed 181 works by Pierre-August Renoir—the world’s largest collection. Barnes Foundation educator Penny Hansen uses high-definition Deep Zoom technology to offer remarkable close-up views of his paintings as she examines his stylistic changes over the years, and discusses Barnes’ great affinity for Renoir, especially his late works. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, October 14, 2021 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Composition is one of the most important of elements of any artwork. This workshop examines fundamental concepts of composition and their practical application in studio-art practice, offering participants tools to enrich their own work as well to analyze and appreciate visual art in general. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, October 14, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Explore the basis of abstraction by studying color, line and shape as they relate to composition.  Learn to create exciting and innovative works of art using a series of drawing, painting, and collage exercises designed to examine nontraditional ways of handling traditional materials and subject matter. 

Course
Thursday, October 14, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Join popular speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin for a fascinating exploration into the intimate relationship between the visible and invisible arts, and how music can literally bind the arts together in this fall series. This session focuses on symbols and allegories. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, October 14, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Explore the basics of color theory including temperature, value, and harmony-creating color schemes. In three hands-on projects, learn to use a color wheel with tinting and toning, color charts, and color harmony studies.

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, October 14, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

In this workshop designed for intermediate photographers, participants develop a greater understanding of the complex relationship among aperture, shutter speed, and ISO and how a camera’s exposure meter views a scene. Topics covered in depth include exposure modes, exposure compensation, filter exposure factors, bracketing, metering modes, histograms, the zone system, dynamic range, eliminating camera shake, tripods, and flash concepts.

Course
Thursday, October 14, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Join Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of history at American University, for in-depth looks at four UNESCO World Heritage sites that have been profoundly affected by nearby volcanoes, from Pompeii to Virunga National Park. Each lavishly illustrated program goes far beyond the typical tourist experience, incorporating insights drawn from current scholarship and research. This session focuses on Virunga National Park.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, October 15, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Spend a fascinating Friday evening expanding your knowledge of the world of wine as you sip along with sommelier Erik Segelbaum in a series of delectable adventures. This immersive program showcases Loire Valley wines and includes a curated personal tasting kit to enhance the experience.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, October 16, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

Put away your point-and-shoot camera and pull out your iPhone to create great images. Learn to make the most of your phone’s camera, starting with photography basics such as essential compositional skills and exposure, then moving on to an exploration of some of the best apps, camera accessories, and low-cost tools for editing and image management.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, October 16, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Dante’s epic poem has provided inspiration for countless artists—from manuscript illuminators to painters and sculptors from a variety of cultures and time periods. Art historian Aneta Georgievska Shine explores some of the greatest of those works by such artists as Botticelli, Blake, Redon, and Rodin. (World Art History Certificate elective,1 credit)

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, October 16, 2021 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Explore creating unique mixed-media artworks by using food- and plant-based items, recycled materials, and household tools and implements to fashion colors, make stencils, and add textures.

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, October 16, 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

The elegant script, commonly known as Copperplate, is unmatched in its usefulness for social stationery. The rhythm and grace of the letterform is used on invitations, menus, and place cards, and can take your personal correspondence to a whole new level. This beautiful script will be explored methodically throughout these class sessions.

Studio Arts Course
Sunday, October 17, 2021 - 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

The beautiful decorations of religious and secular manuscripts are centuries-old Islamic traditions. In this beginning course, Sughra Hussainy, a graduate of Turquoise Mountain Institute in Kabul, Afghanistan, teaches elements of gold-leaf manuscript illumination in the Afghan tradition.

Studio Arts Course
Sunday, October 17, 2021 - 10:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. ET

This course, a valuable introduction for beginners, teaches the basic skills needed as a strong foundation for drawing.

Studio Arts Course
Sunday, October 17, 2021 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

For centuries, religious and secular Islamic manuscripts have contained beautiful geometric decorations. Explore the history and construction of these traditional designs with Sughra Hussainy, a graduate of Turquoise Mountain Institute in Kabul, Afghanistan. 

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, October 17, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Film music can inspire and romance us, salvage a bad movie and make a good one great. In this weekend series, speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin explores the many elements that go into creating an effective score and showcase the memorable work of some of the leading masters of the form. Fasten your seatbelts…it’s going to be a fabulous ride! This session focuses on film music from Jaws, Laura, and The Third Man.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, October 18, 2021 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

The most sculptural of all printmaking techniques, woodblock printing and linocut printing are ideal for creating bold images composed of patterns and textures. This course introduces the relief print, from techniques of design and transfer through cutting and printing the block.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, October 18, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Learn the basics of bobbin lacemaking, from winding the bobbins to making four small lace projects, in this introductory class. Colored threads are used to make it easier to see what is happening.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, October 18, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Artists throughout the world and the centuries have developed practices that allow them to center themselves, find calm, and prepare for making art. The same techniques can be helpful in everyday life as well, offering both a quiet escape and a spark for your imagination.

Course
Monday, October 18, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay and her expert guests for an image-rich lunchtime lecture series focusing on fascinating decorative arts and design topics. This session offers some valuable insider’s tips on navigating today’s changing auction world. Part of a 3-session Decorative Arts fall series.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, October 18, 2021 - 4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. ET

Alcohol inks can be used on a variety of surfaces, including glossy paper, plastic, metal, and glass. Beginning painting students develop their artistic voice in classes that focus on materials and techniques. Students complete several note cards and a frameable print as they experiment with alcohol inks on a variety of surfaces.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, October 18, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Designed for beginners who want to learn how to use their digital or mirrorless camera as a creative tool, students will gain skill in technical aspects of photography so that they can concentrate on composing beautiful images.  Topics include aperture, shutter speed, ISO, the exposure triangle, focal length, metering, white balance, composition and more.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, October 18, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Beginning students as well as experienced painters explore new materials and techniques in watercolor painting.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, October 18, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Understanding the machinations of British diplomacy during World War I is essential to comprehending today’s Middle East. Historian Ralph Nurnberger suveys the fascinating cast of characters involved in often-contradictory secret negotiations over boundaries, as well as how the results contributed to more than a century of conflicts in the region and the establishment of the modern states of Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, and Iraq.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, October 18, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Learn how to paint expressive portraits as you improve your observational skills, the ability to see angles and shapes, and your understanding of color and value. The class emphasizes how to define a subject’s unique features by determining shapes of light and shadow.

Studio Arts Workshop
Tuesday, October 19, 2021 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

This fun class is full of ideas to help boost your brain and spark your creativity. Award winning artist Lori VanKirk Schue will get your creative juices flowing again with the help of everyday materials and easy ideas.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, October 19, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

During the Renaissance, artists began to portray plants and animals with increased fidelity to nature, and natural philosophers began to replace myths with scientific explanations of the natural world. Kay Etheridge, a biology professor at Gettysburg College, traces how revolutionary changes in the ways animals and plants were visually portrayed led to a transformation in our understanding of the world around us.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, October 19, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Who gets commemorated in art and why? Drawing on her new book Twelve Caesars: Images of Power from the Ancient World to the Modern, noted classicist Mary Beard tells the story of how for more than two millennia portraits of the rich, powerful, and famous in the western world have been shaped by the image of Roman emperors, from the ruthless Julius Caesar to the fly-torturing Domitian. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, October 19, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Great art is timeless, and speaks to us across time, culture and space. Yet great works come from real people living real lives. Paul Glenshaw looks at three iconic works by Jacques-Louis David that capture Napoleon and how the collaboration of artist and subject established an imperial image for the world. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Wednesday, October 20, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Documentary filmmaker and writer Sara Lukinson looks at three remarkable memoirs, as different in approach and style as the lives they led. In this session, discuss A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway which conjures a fabled youth in Paris of the 1920s.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, October 20, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

The balance of tension in an image is fundamental in photography: When achieved successfully, well-made visual relationships are created. This course offers participants a better understanding of compositional elements and how best to apply them.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, October 20, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Historian Christopher Hamner examines Grant’s often-overlooked 1864 Overland Campaign to illustrate how his effectiveness as a military commander proved crucial in driving the Union toward its overall victory the following year.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, October 20, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Dorie Greenspan's name is synonymous with baking—and always-tempting recipies. Join her in conversation with Zoë François, host of "Zoë Bakes" on the Magnolia Network, as she reflects on the art of baking, shares stories and great home baking  tips, and talks about how she created her newest book, Baking With Dorie.

Course
Thursday, October 21, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Join popular speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin for a fascinating exploration into the intimate relationship between the visible and invisible arts, and how music can literally bind the arts together in this fall series. This session focuses on The Sharp Family. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, October 21, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

We live surrounded by drowned worlds according to geologist Patrick Nunn. Join him live from Australia as he recounts the histories of some of these shadow lands and what their understanding implies, drawing on research informed by science as well as human memories of submerged lands retained in oral traditions and eyewitness observations that became encoded in myth.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, October 21, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Follow the writer’s footsteps through the capital’s downtown as historian Garrett Peck examines the urban backdrop against which Whitman carved out a role as a nurse to Civil War soldiers; met the love of his life; worked as a federal clerk; and built a community through his literary circle.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, October 22, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The greatest painter of the Venetian Renaissance, Titian, was also the first whose clientele was largely international. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo surveys how the golden age of the Serenissima Republic is reflected in the art Titian generated for its churches, confraternities, and palaces. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Friday, October 22, 2021 - 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

In this course, students are introduced to the materials, tools, and technologies used in collage and assemblage. They find inspiration in artists who worked in collage including Joseph Cornell, Romare Bearden, and Gertrude Green, whose works are held in Smithsonian collections. Students express their observations by developing their own collage, mixed-media, or assemblage projects.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, October 23, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET

Delve into the fascinating history of photography as an art form in this unique program that combines a lecture with a hands-on project. Art historian and photographer Patricia Howard introduces the world of the photo surrealists—Man Ray, Laszlo Maholy Nagy, Hannah Höch and others—and explores how they pushed the boundaries of photographic imagery in the 1920s to 1940s. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, October 23, 2021 - 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

In this workshop, beginners are introduced to surface freestyle hand embroidery. In this style, the stitches are applied freely, disregarding the weave or structure of the ground cloth. Students learn how to select and prepare fabric using a simple design, ready their hoop, and begin stitching.

Studio Arts Workshop
Sunday, October 24, 2021 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The nearly 2,000-year-old art of Coptic stitch binding is still used in contemporary book binding. Create a Coptic-bound journal and learn about Coptic language, literature, and book culture in a class that is perfect for beginners interested in art, history, and bookbinding.

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, October 24, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Film music can inspire and romance us, salvage a bad movie and make a good one great. In this weekend series, speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin explores the many elements that go into creating an effective score and showcase the memorable work of some of the leading masters of the form. Fasten your seatbelts…it’s going to be a fabulous ride! This session focuses on film music from The Madness of King George, Chicken Run, and Dr. Zhivago.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, October 25, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Some moments in movies never leave us: the piercing eyes of a private eye, a raft hurtling down the rapids, that little black dress, the close-up of a fading movie star. In a 5-session film discussion series, documentary filmmaker and writer Sara Lukinson revisits some of our favorite movies and characters, setting them against the backdrop of their times, the people who dreamed them up, and the America they reflected—or asked us to imagine. This session focuses on Billy Wilder.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, October 25, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Oprah Winfrey’s interview with Harry and Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex riveted a public desperate for distraction from the ongoing pandemic. Historian Julie Taddeo explores their withdrawal from the royal family—Megxit—and its fallout within a larger historical context, linking it to past scandals from the Georgian era through the late 20th century.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, October 25, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Begin by learning basic tapestry weaving techniques and design. Then, create a miniature woven tapestry on a small frame loom. Techniques covered include warping the loom; color mixing and hatching; and how to create horizontal stripes, vertical lines, irregular shapes, shading, and contour.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, October 26, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The Sumerians are famous as a people who created the world’s earliest civilization. Living on the fertile plains of what is today southern Iraq (ancient Sumer), they developed a flourishing culture between about 3500 and 2000 B.C. Paul Collins, a curator at Oxford University’s Ashmolean Museum and author of The Sumerians: Lost Civilizations, tells the story of how a Sumerian people came to be “discovered” and how things are not always as they seem.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, October 26, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Understanding how to fully utilize your camera’s flash is key for photographers wishing to take their photographic skill to the next level. This class, designed for digital photographers familiar with aperture, shutter speed, ISO and metering in manual mode, offers to do just that.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, October 27, 2021 - 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

Explore a liberating style of abstract embroidery using an array of improvisational stitches on found fabric, specifically scraps of vintage kimono silk. Learn some of the principles of abstract art making, developing a language of marks through different stitches, and discuss color palettes, as well as how to “edit" what doesn't work in your composition.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, October 27, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Hollywood can imagine impressive and convincing alien creatures, but is there any science behind our understanding of what extraterrestrial life might be like?  Although we don’t know whether they’ll be green, zoologist Arik Kershenbaum shares his insights into how familiar they might be, using lessons from the behaviors that we see in animals on our own planet.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, October 27, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Whether it be fish nurseries, migratory bird pit stops, or natural water filterers, wetlands provide near limitless value to humans and wildlife around the world. Naturalist Liana Vitali of Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary in Upper Marlboro, Maryland, offers an audio-visual immersion into the marshes, ponds, swamps, and peat bogs of North America to discover just how important these ecosystems are to life on Earth.

Course
Thursday, October 28, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Join popular speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin for a fascinating exploration into the intimate relationship between the visible and invisible arts, and how music can literally bind the arts together in this fall series. This session focuses on The Artist as Musician, the Composer as Model. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, October 28, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Like a select few in music—Hoagy, Duke, Elvis, Wynton, Dolly—you recognize her by her first name alone. Join John Edward Hasse, co-curator of the long-running Smithsonian exhibition Ella Fitzgerald: First Lady of Song, as he draws on film and video clips, rare photographs, and original recordings to provide insights into her extraordinary journey from shy orphan to beloved international celebrity.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, October 28, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

To wage their bitter war with the powerful British Empire from 1919 to 1921, Irish nationalists turned to novel tactics both military and political: a strategy of assassinations, hit-and-run raids, and—a new concept—urban guerrilla warfare. Historian Kevin Matthews discusses how this conflict set the standard for other independence struggles in the 20th century.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, October 30, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Although less famous than their Tudor cousins, the Scottish Stuarts ruled over a period of growth and chaos that changed England and Scotland forever. Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger looks at the eventful hundred years of the Stuart reign.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, October 30, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. ET

Civilizations have risen and fallen for centuries on the banks of the Mekong River. Long before there was Phnom Penh, Hanoi, or Vientiane, there were the settlements in the areas now known as Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, and Thailand. Art historian Robert DeCaroli investigates the cultures that emerged along this massive 2,700-mile-long river. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, October 30, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET

Some book forms also make whimsical toys. Learn to construct a Halloween Jacob’s Ladder (with box), smash books that become stars or caterpillars, miniature button books, and more in this enjoyable workshop.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 1, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Whether created by artists such as Calder, Oldenburg, and Christo or generated from within communities, public art can powerfully speak to viewers through a wide variety of images, messages, materials, and settings. Art historian Janetta Rebold Benton surveys public art’s many forms, its creative roots and makers, and its social value. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 1, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Washington, D.C., has given much to the musical world beyond its best-known export, Duke Ellington. In a new series of programs, musician, broadcaster, and historian Ken Avis spotlights the city’s music traditions and how social change, technology, and business innovations shaped the sounds that emerged from D.C.—a political town with a serious music habit. This session focuses on D.C.'s acoustic folk and blues traditions.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, November 1, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. ET

Move beyond the technical "how to's" of photography and shift your focus to cultivating and strengthening your artistic vision. In a small group discussions and critiques, explore ways how to pinpoint the idea, concept, and feeling you want to communicate with your work

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 2, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for three online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on Character: Discover Dimensions.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 2, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Since its very beginning, Hollywood has made audiences laugh in forms from slapstick to screwball, romance to social satire, musicals to gross-out teen films. Media expert Brian Rose looks at major highlights of screen comedy over the last 125 years, drawing on more than 40 examples from Hollywood’s funniest films. Prepare to LOL.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 2, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

To call Cokie Roberts a legendary journalist merely scratches the surface of the life of this bestselling author and champion for women who was a fixture on national radio and television for 40 years. Journalist, author, and educator Steve Roberts, Cokie’s husband of 53 years, reflects on her many accomplishments and how she lived each day with a devotion to helping others.

Course
Wednesday, November 3, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Documentary filmmaker and writer Sara Lukinson looks at three remarkable memoirs, as different in approach and style as the lives they led. In this session, discuss Conundrum by travel writer Jan Morris who gives a spellbinding account of her riskiest journey, becoming another physical version of herself.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, November 3, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Learn the fundamentals of drawing the human body through an exploration of the skeleton, planes of motion, gesture, musculature, and other key elements. Virtual anatomy software, a digital figure drawing site, and a variety of props allow students to discover how to convey motion.

Studio Arts Course
Friday, November 5, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

With limited time and money, artists and other small business owners need an effective content strategy that makes posting quick, easy, and impactful. Learn to use every aspect of the Instagram app (reels, stories, IGTV, posts), optimize your profile, establish your brand, and create fun and engaging posts designed to retain and grow your following.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, November 5, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Many iconic churches and palaces in Florence were constructed to represent wealth and power, but architect Filippo Brunelleschi’s Hospital of the Innocents was the first institution in the world to be dedicated to the well-being of children. Renaissance art historian Elaine Ruffolo explores its architecture and magnificent charitable history. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, November 6, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Adobe Lightroom is the best program organizing and editing your photographs. You can work with either RAW or JPEG files. This two-session workshop offers users an excellent working understanding of the program.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, November 6, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

This year, send friends and family bespoke holiday cards. From the decorated envelope to the personalized sentiment, paper crafter Karen Cadogan shares tips and demonstrates techniques for creating simply elegant, unique cards that will become a keepsake long after the season ends. 

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, November 6, 2021 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The jewel-like pigment of soft pastels is perfect for capturing the glow of sunlight as it illuminates the landscape. Guided by a master pastel painter, create artworks as you learn the medium’s techniques and nuances.

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, November 7, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Film music can inspire and romance us, salvage a bad movie and make a good one great. In this weekend series, speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin explores the many elements that go into creating an effective score and showcase the memorable work of some of the leading masters of the form. Fasten your seatbelts…it’s going to be a fabulous ride! This session focuses on film music from The Red Pony, High Noon, and The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly.

Course
Sunday, November 7, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. ET

The notion that a picture is worth a thousand words is meant to convey the power of imagery. But what of the power of words—if they are Hemingway’s musings on a work of art, Van Gogh’s personal letters, or Michelangelo’s thoughts on his life and art expressed in his poetry? Explore the alchemy that occurs at the intersection of art and literature with David Gariff,  senior lecturer at the National Gallery of Art.  This session focuses on The Poetry of Michelangelo. (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 8, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Some moments in movies never leave us: the piercing eyes of a private eye, a raft hurtling down the rapids, that little black dress, the close-up of a fading movie star. In a 5-session film discussion series, documentary filmmaker and writer Sara Lukinson revisits some of our favorite movies and characters, setting them against the backdrop of their times, the people who dreamed them up, and the America they reflected—or asked us to imagine. This session focuses on Anatomy of a Murder and 12 Angry Men.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 8, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

In the 1890s, the first great American musical craze, ragtime, swept the nation—and the sounds of the parlor piano would never be the same. Composer and pianist Orrin Grossman traces the form from its beginnings to the more complex styles of stride and “novelty” piano in a lively and entertaining program that includes Joplin’s wonderful rags and a few of his own arrangements of favorite Gershwin’s songs.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 9, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for three online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on Setting: Explore Place and Time.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 9, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

What was it like to be a Jewish citizen in Venice between their settlement there in the 16th century to the end of World War II? From the beginning, the rules that governed Jewish life in the ghetto—a Venetian word—contrasted greatly with those outside the quarter. Historian Monica Chojnacka highlights the complicated history of the Venetian Jews and places it in the context of greater European history.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 9, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Eleanor of Aquitaine is the stuff of legend. Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger considers how the many stories have grown from the real life of the ambitious and powerful woman who managed to become queen consort of England and France and shaped the reigns of two of England’s most famous kings: Richard the Lionheart and King John.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, November 13, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

For nearly two millennia, Augustine’s arguments, insights, and ideas on faith have profoundly shaped the Western intellectual tradition. Augustine scholar Scott MacDonald explores some of those enduringly compelling ideas.

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, November 14, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Film music can inspire and romance us, salvage a bad movie and make a good one great. In this weekend series, speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin explores the many elements that go into creating an effective score and showcase the memorable work of some of the leading masters of the form. Fasten your seatbelts…it’s going to be a fabulous ride! This session focuses on film music from To Kill a Mockingbird, Psycho, and Planet of the Apes.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, November 15, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Explore many new techniques and build new skills as you create four small projects in an intermediate-level course.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 15, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Washington, D.C., has given much to the musical world beyond its best-known export, Duke Ellington. In a new series of programs, musician, broadcaster, and historian Ken Avis spotlights the city’s music traditions and how social change, technology, and business innovations shaped the sounds that emerged from D.C.—a political town with a serious music habit. This session focuses on D.C.'s soul, funk, and go-go traditions.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 16, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for three online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on Story: Imagine Possibilities.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 16, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

We often think of the civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome as discrete incubators of Western culture. However, Greece and Rome did not develop in isolation. The lands to the north of the Greek and Roman peninsulas were inhabited by non-literate communities that stretched from the Atlantic Ocean to the Ural Mountains. Archaeologist Peter Bogucki reveals the development of these nearly forgotten people from the Stone Age through the collapse of the Roman Empire in the west.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Art historian Bonita Billman examines how a group of painters created powerful and personal works that revealed unvarnished truths about urban life in the early 20th century. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

For thousands of years people have wondered if there are planets like Earth, if they’re common, and if any have signs of life. Sara Seager, a professor of physics and planetary science at MIT who is one of the leading experts on the search for Earth-like planets, shares the latest advances in this revolutionary field. Afterward, Peter Plavchan, a professor of physics and astronomy at George Mason University, brings the skies into your living room with remote control of the GMU Observatory.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 29, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Washington, D.C., has given much to the musical world beyond its best-known export, Duke Ellington. In a new series of programs, musician, broadcaster, and historian Ken Avis spotlights the city’s music traditions and how social change, technology, and business innovations shaped the sounds that emerged from D.C.—a political town with a serious music habit. This session focuses on D.C.'s 21st century music scene.

Course
Sunday, December 5, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. ET

The notion that a picture is worth a thousand words is meant to convey the power of imagery. But what of the power of words—if they are Hemingway’s musings on a work of art, Van Gogh’s personal letters, or Michelangelo’s thoughts on his life and art expressed in his poetry? Explore the alchemy that occurs at the intersection of art and literature with David Gariff,  senior lecturer at the National Gallery of Art.  This session focuses on Ernest Hemingway, Joan Miró, and The Farm (1921-22). (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, December 7, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

For centuries no one had been aware of the ancient Indus civilization. Today we know it was as ancient and extensive as those of Egypt and Mesopotamia. Historian and science writer Andrew Robinson introduces this tantalizing ‘lost’ civilization that uniquely combined artistic excellence, technological sophistication, and economic vigor with social egalitarianism, political freedom, and religious moderation.