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All upcoming Biography & Autobiography programs

All upcoming Biography & Autobiography programs

Showing programs 1 to 10 of 34
Session 1 of 5
May 28, 2024

Stravinsky’s spectacular early ballet scores such as Le Sacre du Printemps can distract us from where this prolific artist went next. Classical music and opera expert Saul Lilienstein examines a selection of classically inspired masterworks spanning 1918 through 1951—from L’Histoire du Soldat to The Rake’s Progress. Film excerpts of Stravinsky in conversation with other artists enhance the portrait of the man and the conductor.


May 30, 2024

The taboo-smashing star Anna May Wong challenged Hollywood at its own game by speaking out about the industry’s blatant racism. Unhappy with being typecast as a China doll or dragon lady, she used her international fame to reshape Asian American representation in film. Biographer Katie Gee Salisbury discusses Wong’s career as a groundbreaking artist, bringing an unsung heroine to light and reclaiming her place in cinema history.


Session 2 of 5
June 4, 2024

Stravinsky’s spectacular early ballet scores such as Le Sacre du Printemps can distract us from where this prolific artist went next. Classical music and opera expert Saul Lilienstein examines a selection of classically inspired masterworks spanning 1918 through 1951—from L’Histoire du Soldat to The Rake’s Progress. Film excerpts of Stravinsky in conversation with other artists enhance the portrait of the man and the conductor.


June 6, 2024

Famous since the late 1920s, a century later Georgia O’Keeffe remains an icon of American art. Art historian Bonita Billman traces O’Keeffe’s life and artistic career from her upbringing in rural Wisconsin to her association with New York City’s avant-garde circle of the ’20s to her years in New Mexico, where the desert opened a new range of subject matter for her work. She also looks at the influences on O’Keeffe—including fellow artist Arthur Wesley Dow, who taught her the importance of “filling a space in a beautiful way,” and her husband, gallerist and photographer Alfred Stieglitz. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Session 3 of 5
June 11, 2024

Stravinsky’s spectacular early ballet scores such as Le Sacre du Printemps can distract us from where this prolific artist went next. Classical music and opera expert Saul Lilienstein examines a selection of classically inspired masterworks spanning 1918 through 1951—from L’Histoire du Soldat to The Rake’s Progress. Film excerpts of Stravinsky in conversation with other artists enhance the portrait of the man and the conductor.


June 11, 2024

Walter Raleigh called Henry VIII a “merciless prince.” He was a “disgrace to human nature and a blot of blood and grease upon the history of England” according to Charles Dickens, and clergyman Edward Lewis declared him “a sincere Christian and a patriot king.” Tudor scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger examines why the real Henry VIII was all these men, a complex king who fascinates us more than 450 years after his tumultuous reign.


June 12, 2024

Édouard Manet was one of the first 19th-century artists to paint modern life, as well as a pivotal figure in the transition from Realism to Impressionism. In a richly illustrated program, art historian Joseph P. Cassar critically examines several of Manet’s key works within their historical context. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


June 14, 2024

Though best known for his psychologically revealing self-portraits, Rembrandt was also an unrivaled master of light and shadow and expressive, luxuriant brushwork, qualities that would be emulated by generations of later artists. Art historian Aneta Georgievska-Shine explores the most distinctive aspects of Rembrandt’s artistic language through an analysis of some of his greatest masterpieces—from public commissions to his representations of stories from classical and biblical history to his most private of works. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)


June 15, 2024

Vincent van Gogh spent 1886 to 1888 living in Paris with his brother Theo. Drawn into a social and artistic circle of like-minded rising painters that he called the Painters of the Petit Boulevard, van Gogh’s immersion in the world of the avant-garde helped him define his own style and technique. Art historian Bonita Billman explores why these years in Paris were among the most influential in van Gogh’s brief life. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)


June 15, 2024

What did women do to shape England’s culture and traditions in nine centuries of turmoil, plague, famine, religious reform, and the rise of empire and industry? Author Philippa Gregory shares stores of the female soldiers, highwaywomen, pirates, miners, ship owners, runaway enslaved women, “female husbands,” social campaigners, and rebels who shaped a nation—as well as the prejudice they faced and how they built a society as diverse and varied as the women themselves.