Skip to main content
Smithsonian Associates - Entertaining, Informative, Eclectic, Insightful

Archaeology

Course
Tuesday, February 16, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Each of the more than 1,100 UNESCO World Heritage Sites offers a fascinating glimpse into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. Some, however, are more iconic than others. Historian Justin M. Jacobs offers an in-depth overview of four of the most significant ancient sites in Egypt, Persia, Greece, and Mesoamerica. This session focuses on Ancient Thebes.

Course
Tuesday, February 23, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Each of the more than 1,100 UNESCO World Heritage Sites offers a fascinating glimpse into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. Some, however, are more iconic than others. Historian Justin M. Jacobs offers an in-depth overview of four of the most significant ancient sites in Egypt, Persia, Greece, and Mesoamerica. This session focuses on Ancient Persepolis.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, February 26, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

How in the 5th century B.C. did a small town on a remote peninsula jutting into the Mediterranean create an unparalleled legacy of innovation, higher education, discovery, and invention? Historian Diane Cline examines how the social fabric of classical Athens shaped an environment in which creative people and their new ideas could thrive.

Course
Tuesday, March 2, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Each of the more than 1,100 UNESCO World Heritage Sites offers a fascinating glimpse into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. Some, however, are more iconic than others. Historian Justin M. Jacobs offers an in-depth overview of four of the most significant ancient sites in Egypt, Persia, Greece, and Mesoamerica. This session focuses on Acropolis.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, March 6, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The famous breaking of the Mayan code in the late 20th century revolutionized the study of these peoples and of ancient America. Humanities scholar George Scheper examines how interdisciplinary study of the Maya extends beyond the traditional archaeological focus to comprise political and social history, art, comparative religion, and ecology.

Course
Tuesday, March 9, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Each of the more than 1,100 UNESCO World Heritage Sites offers a fascinating glimpse into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. Some, however, are more iconic than others. Historian Justin M. Jacobs offers an in-depth overview of four of the most significant ancient sites in Egypt, Persia, Greece, and Mesoamerica. This session focuses on Teotihuacan.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, April 10, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Excavations at the extraordinarily preserved desert city at Tell el-Amarna provide unmatched evidence of the daily life and religious practices of ancient Egyptians. Egyptologist Jacquelyn Williamson, a senior member of the Tell el-Amarna archaeological team, examines the latest discoveries at the site and what they reveal about the city founded as a center for Pharaoh Akhenaten’s monotheistic cult of the sun god Aten. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, April 28, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

The 11,000-year old megalith Göbekli Tepe in a remote part of present-day Turkey has yet to yield definitive answers to the many questions swirling around it. Serif Yenen, a Turkish travel specialist, writer, and filmmaker, tells the story of this magnificent and mysterious built environment and what we can glean about the people who lived in a place once assumed to predate civilization.