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All upcoming Art & Architecture programs

All upcoming Art & Architecture programs

Showing programs 1 to 10 of 53
June 14, 2024

The rolling hills east of the Anacostia River, with a commanding view of Washington D.C., have been settled for centuries. From the trading grounds of the Indigenous Nacotchtank to a whites-only suburb known as Uniontown to a predominantly Black community, Anacostia has seen dramatic change. Join Carolyn Muraskin, founder of DC Design Tours, for a look at the area’s architecture, which encapsulates its many identities.


June 14, 2024

Though best known for his psychologically revealing self-portraits, Rembrandt was also an unrivaled master of light and shadow and expressive, luxuriant brushwork, qualities that would be emulated by generations of later artists. Art historian Aneta Georgievska-Shine explores the most distinctive aspects of Rembrandt’s artistic language through an analysis of some of his greatest masterpieces—from public commissions to his representations of stories from classical and biblical history to his most private of works. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)


June 15, 2024

Vincent van Gogh spent 1886 to 1888 living in Paris with his brother Theo. Drawn into a social and artistic circle of like-minded rising painters that he called the Painters of the Petit Boulevard, van Gogh’s immersion in the world of the avant-garde helped him define his own style and technique. Art historian Bonita Billman explores why these years in Paris were among the most influential in van Gogh’s brief life. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)


June 17, 2024

Join curator Elizabeth Lay Little for an image-rich late spring lunchtime series focusing on decorative arts and design topics. This session explores how Coco Chanel’s Riviera vacation home mirrored its owner, a designer who was equal parts modern, simple, and complex with design historian Jean Marie Layton. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


June 18, 2024

Since the late 1940s, California has been an epicenter for some of the most striking and innovative modern domestic architecture in the world. Whether built for the families of industrial workers and returning GIs or Hollywood stars seeking a Modernist getaway in Palm Springs, they represent some of the most iconic and significant examples of Mid-Century Modern houses. Bill Keene, a lecturer on architecture and urban studies, surveys the state’s bold postwar landscape of housing design, materials, and construction. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


June 20, 2024

The rolling hills east of the Anacostia River, with a commanding view of Washington D.C., have been settled for centuries. From the trading grounds of the Indigenous Nacotchtank to a whites-only suburb known as Uniontown to a predominantly Black community, Anacostia has seen dramatic change. Join Carolyn Muraskin, founder of DC Design Tours, for a look at the area’s architecture, which encapsulates its many identities.


Session 3 of 4
June 20, 2024

From the vibrant paintings found in Stone Age caves to the abstract sculptures produced during the continent’s colonial period, the arts of Africa have been shaped by unique creative insight as well as by specific political, social, religious, and economic forces. In a four-part series, art historian Kevin Tervala explores these vibrant artistic expressions through an examination of the continent’s historical trajectory. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)


June 21, 2024

Author Coleen Christian Burke surveys weddings of presidential family members that reflected a mix of the private, the public, and the political—and examines how the high-profile events played out against the changing cultural and political mores of the day. She focuses on three presidential daughters—Lynda Byrd and Luci Baines Johnson and Tricia Nixon—and offers highlights of other notable White House weddings through history.


June 21, 2024

Founded 50 years before the federal capital of Washington, D.C., Georgetown got its start as a gritty port city on the banks of the Potomac River. Despite very modest beginnings, the area eventually came to have the most expensive and desirable property in the District. Carolyn Muraskin, founder of DC Design Tours, reveals the highlights and secrets of the city’s most exclusive neighborhood, home to palatial mansions, notable cemeteries, stately churches, and a world-class university.


June 23, 2024

The rolling hills east of the Anacostia River, with a commanding view of Washington D.C., have been settled for centuries. From the trading grounds of the Indigenous Nacotchtank to a whites-only suburb known as Uniontown to a predominantly Black community, Anacostia has seen dramatic change. Join Carolyn Muraskin, founder of DC Design Tours, for a look at the area’s architecture, which encapsulates its many identities.