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Art & Architecture

Course

Enduring Themes in Western Art (Part III)

Wednesday, November 30, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Art historian Joseph Cassar examines important masterworks within selected genres and offers a new way to understand and appreciate the cultural norms that influenced artists’ choices. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

Maria Sibylla Merian: A Biologist to the Bone

Thursday, December 1, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

The aesthetic appeal of the images created by Maria Sibylla Merian (German, 1647–1717) has led history to label her as an artist who painted and etched natural history subjects. Kay Etheridge, a professor emeritus of biology at Gettysburg College, draws on Merian’s own words and art to reveal she was as passionate a naturalist (biologist in modern terms) as Charles Darwin or Carl Linnaeus.


Lecture/Seminar

Michelangelo's Women

Friday, December 2, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Michelangelo’s artistic audacity extended far beyond his heroic men to encompass an amazing cohort of authoritative, prophetic, nurturing, and active women. Art historian Elizabeth Lev looks at Michelangelo’s life and work to reveal how the Florentine master turned the tables on old tropes and stereotypes in his portrayals of women in daring, innovative, and empowering imagery. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

Europe 1900: The Golden Ages of Vienna, Paris, London

Saturday, December 3, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

The year 1900 found three of Europe’s greatest cities entering defining eras in their historical and cultural development. In a richly illustrated seminar, lecturer George Scheper explores how the alignment of creative forces shaped three highly distinctive urban milieus—each nourished by the energy and excitement of new ideas and each witnessing the birth of modernism in the coming century. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

Winter Wisdom: A Reflective Writing Workshop

Tuesday, December 6, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover the power of reflective writing guided by the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, Mary Hall Surface. Inspired by Claude Monet’s The Magpie and two winter poems by Mary Oliver, you’ll explore the lessons that the season offers us when we slow down, look closely, and reflect.


Course

UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Wednesday, December 7, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The 1,121 UNESCO World Heritage sites throughout the world provide fascinating glimpses into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. In a lavishly illustrated series, historian Justin M. Jacobs offers an in-depth overview of the Great Wall of China.


Lecture/Seminar

Rediscovering Botticelli’s Lost Drawings—and the Renaissance

Thursday, December 8, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

The 19th-century rediscovery of Sandro Botticelli’s drawings illustrating The Divine Comedy reminded the art world of how the artist’s work embodies the spirit of the Renaissance. Joseph Luzzi of Bard College explains how and why Botticelli’s creations from the beauty of Primavera and the Birth of Venus to the drama of Dante’s Purgatorio—still move us today. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

The Barnes Foundation Philadelphia

Friday, December 9, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

The Barnes is often considered the greatest post-impressionist and early-modern art collection in the world. Join Barnes Foundation educator Penny Hansen as she covers its history and uses unique high-definition Deep Zoom technology to offer closeup looks at masterpieces that reveal their surfaces and details in ways that bring the art and the artists to vivid life. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Tour

Holidays at Winterthur and Longwood Gardens: Featuring Jacqueline Kennedy and H. F. du Pont: From Winterthur to the White House

Sunday, December 11, 2022 - 8:00 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Kick off your holidays in grand style with a day spent visiting two special destinations. Begin at Winterthur to view the opulent holiday décor and take in the exhibition Jacqueline Kennedy and H. F. du Pont: From Winterthur to the White House. An evening visit to nearby Longwood Gardens offers time on your own to relax, wander the grounds, and take in the spectacular seasonal decorations.


Lecture/Seminar

Decking the Halls at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue

Sunday, December 11, 2022 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Author and historian Coleen Christian Burke, a 2014 White House design partner, leads a journey through Christmas history as she reveals how the annual decorating themes developed by first ladies are turned into sparkling realities. She also discusses how the holiday White House functions as both a private home and public space and offers views of some of the most memorable seasonal settings created at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.


Lecture/Seminar

Building St. Peter's Basilica

Monday, December 12, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

After 100 years of construction, the reign of 18 different popes, and the direction of 12 different architects, St. Peter’s Basilica was finally completed in 1626. Rocky Ruggiero, an architectural historian and specialist in the Italian Renaissance, explores the dramatic construction history of this great church and the breathtaking artwork by artists such as Michelangelo and Bernini that adorns it. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

Winter Wisdom: A Reflective Writing Workshop

Tuesday, December 13, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover the power of reflective writing guided by the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, Mary Hall Surface. Inspired by Claude Monet’s The Magpie and two winter poems by Mary Oliver, you’ll explore the lessons that the season offers us when we slow down, look closely, and reflect.


Course

UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Wednesday, December 14, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The 1,121 UNESCO World Heritage sites throughout the world provide fascinating glimpses into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. In a lavishly illustrated series, historian Justin M. Jacobs offers an in-depth overview of the Sacred Buddhist Landscape of Bagan.


Lecture/Seminar

Los Angeles: Portrait of a Mature Metropolis

Wednesday, December 14, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

In the decades following World War II, a myriad of factors shaped modern Los Angeles, including the growth of industry, the evolution of the entertainment business, and the city’s transformation into the home of notable cultural and educational institutions. Bill Keene, a lecturer in history, urban studies, and architecture, examines the social and economic forces that made Los Angeles the powerhouse it is today.


Lecture/Seminar

Donatello: Artist of the Florentine Renaissance

Friday, December 16, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

A technical master, Donatello broke new ground in the methods he used and the forms he chose to develop, leaving behind a legacy of creations that seem startlingly modern. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo highlights the life and work of this artist who embodied the ideas of the Renaissance in sculpture. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

Frederic Church's Olana: A Masterwork of American Landscape and Design

Friday, January 6, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Olana, the Hudson Valley home of 19th-century landscape artist Frederic Church might be his most enduring masterwork. Sean Sawyer, president of the Olana Partnership, provides an overview of Church’s creation and leads a virtual tour of the landscape and main house, with its rich collection of fine and decorative arts that reflect the global reach of Church's travels and vision.


Course

Write Into Art: Creative Writing Inspired by Visual Art

Tuesday, January 10, 2023 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for five online workshops that spotlight a diverse range of visual art chosen to inspire writers of all experience levels to deepen their process and practice. This writing session is inspired by Kenjiro Nomura’s The Farm.


Course

The Women Who Made Art History: From the Renaissance to the 21st Century

Tuesday, January 10, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

For centuries, women were conspicuously underrepresented in—and indeed almost absent from—art history books. Art historian Judy Pomerantz examines the role women have played in Western visual arts from the Renaissance to the present through an exploration of the works and lives of female artists who made significant marks on the art of their time and on the course of art history. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

The Transformation of Christ in Art: From the Catacombs to Caravaggio

Wednesday, January 11, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

The depiction of Jesus in Western art underwent dramatic transformation from the earliest known images through the Baroque period of early modernity. Historian Cheryl White examines the unique social and artistic influences that shaped these diverse representations and progressions of Christ’s images across time. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

Spanish Art and Architecture: A Treasury of Delights

Friday, January 13, 2023 - 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

The art and architecture of Spain as seen in the works of El Greco, Goya, Velazquez, Picasso, and Gaudi offer a window into the influences that define the country's history and national identity. Art historian Joseph Cassar highlights artists and structures that exemplify Spain’s distinctive cultural heritage. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

Mid-century Modern: Sleek, Stylish, and Accessible

Friday, January 13, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

There’s much more to the Mid-century Modern movement than just the iconic buildings it inspired. The style was spread by design principles and color palettes that saturated everything from kitchen appliances to advertising to airline paint schemes. Lecturer Bill Keene examines the architecture and the wider implications of the broad scope of Mid-century Modern design trends and developments.


Course

Write Into Art: Creative Writing Inspired by Visual Art

Tuesday, January 17, 2023 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for five online workshops that spotlight a diverse range of visual art chosen to inspire writers of all experience levels to deepen their process and practice. This writing session is inspired by Antonio Martorell’s La Playa Negra I (Tar Beach I).


Lecture/Seminar

The Three Greatest Paintings in Florence

Friday, January 20, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Florence nurtured an unceasing succession of great artists for centuries, but among its hundreds and hundreds of Renaissance masterpieces, which are considered the most significant? Renaissance art historian Elaine Ruffolo offers an in-depth look at three paintings and why she considers them the most important in the city. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Tour

An Artful Weekend in New York: The Whitney, the Met, and the Neue Gallery

January 21 - 22, 2023, 8:00 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. ET

It’s the perfect post-holiday treat for yourself: an art-filled weekend escape to Manhattan that gives you plenty of time to take in several of the most intriguing exhibits on view in three cultural powerhouses—and a night on the town to enjoy as you like. Art historian Ursula Rehn Wolfman leads the visit, which highlights early 20th-century artists and their works. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

Renaissance Rome

Saturday, January 21, 2023 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The return of the papacy in the 15th century transformed Rome from a dilapidated town littered with ruins to a city at the center of the Renaissance movement in Europe. The pope and cardinals spent lavishly as Bramante, Michelangelo, and Raphael were given one commission after another to complete and beautify the city of God. Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in early-Renaissance art, examines this pivotal time in art history as it swept across Rome. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)


Course

Write Into Art: Creative Writing Inspired by Visual Art

Tuesday, January 24, 2023 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for five online workshops that spotlight a diverse range of visual art chosen to inspire writers of all experience levels to deepen their process and practice. This writing session is inspired by a self-portrait of 19th-century French artist Suzanne Valadon.


Lecture/Seminar

Cocktails, Lipstick, and Jazz: Fashion and the 1920s New Woman

Tuesday, January 24, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Beaded fringe bounced to the syncopated sounds of jazz, while illegal gin sloshed in long-stemmed glasses. The New Woman of the ’20s was smart, bold, and sophisticated. Design historian and curator Elizabeth Lay shares the stories and images of this singular era in our history when the new was everything, particularly for women.


Course

Write Into Art: Creative Writing Inspired by Visual Art

Tuesday, January 31, 2023 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for five online workshops that spotlight a diverse range of visual art chosen to inspire writers of all experience levels to deepen their process and practice. This writing session is inspired by Edward Hopper’s People in the Sun.


Lecture/Seminar

Art Crimes: International Art Heists

Wednesday, February 1, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Big-money art attracts big-money criminals. Expert on art fraud and former FBI agent Robert Wittman provides a closeup view of some of the notorious heists and daring recovery operations he worked on as an agent.


Course

Write Into Art: Creative Writing Inspired by Visual Art

Tuesday, February 7, 2023 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for five online workshops that spotlight a diverse range of visual art chosen to inspire writers of all experience levels to deepen their process and practice. This writing session is inspired by Alma Thomas’ colorful compositions, including Pansies in Washington.


Lecture/Seminar

Marisol: A Pop Art Superstar

Thursday, February 9, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Glamorous, sophisticated, worldly, and wickedly funny, Marisol Escobar, better known simply as “Marisol,” was the most famous and successful female Pop artist. Art historian Nancy G. Heller examines Marisol’s major works and career, with particular attention to the difficulties of a female Latinx artist in a world dominated by white men. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

Astrology in Renaissance Art: Representation and Meaning

Thursday, February 9, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The intersection of art and astrology played a key role during the Renaissance, particularly for patrons like the Medici family, who used astrological imagery to promote themselves and their increasing de-facto power in Florence. Art critic Claudia Rousseau examines the development of astrological practices during the period, their cultural importance, and the artworks they influenced. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

War and Pieces: The Met Cloisters and the Lens of History

Friday, February 10, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

When the Cloisters—the branch of the Metropolitan Museum devoted to the art of the medieval world—opened in 1938, not a word was spoken about the threat of war looming over Europe. Yet ironically, the Cloisters’ very foundations stand in witness to the devastating impact of centuries of war and revolution on artistic heritage. Barbara Drake Boehm, curator emerita of the Met Cloisters, examines the museum’s finest works of art against the backdrop of history. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Lecture/Seminar

The Regency World of Jane Austen: Art, Architecture, Culture

Saturday, February 11, 2023 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Emma Woodhouse, Elizabeth Bennet, Anne Elliot, and the Dashwood sisters may be fictional heroines, but their creator Jane Austen set their adventures in romance against the very real social and historical backdrop of Regency England. Art historian Bonita Billman brings the era to life as she surveys Regency manners and fashions, the personalities who dominated the public imagination, and the stylish spa town of Bath, where many of Austen’s characters made appearances. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)


Course

Lunchtime with a Curator: Decorative Arts Design Series

Monday, February 13, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay as she hosts an image-rich series on decorative arts and design topics with guests. In this winter lunchtime program, Lay's guest is Rosemary Harden, senior curator and Fashion Museum Bath manager, who surveys the past, present, and future of this museum.


Lecture/Seminar

Ancient Art Collections of Rome

Monday, February 13, 2023 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Many of Rome’s lesser-known museums contain some of the world’s most significant Greco-Roman art. Rocky Ruggiero, an expert in Renaissance art, explores the ancient art collections of the Capitoline Museums, the Ara Pacis Museum, the Villa Giulia, and the Palazzo Massimo. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Course

UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Wednesday, February 15, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The 1,154 UNESCO World Heritage sites throughout the world provide fascinating glimpses into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. In a lavishly illustrated series, historian Justin M. Jacobs offers an in-depth overview of Samarra and the Abbasid Caliphate.


Lecture/Seminar

Discovering Türkiye

Thursday, February 16, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

PBS television host Darley Newman shares great places to discover in Türkiye (the now-official name for Turkey) and how to get the most out of your travels, whether you’re visiting bustling bazaars in Istanbul or venturing off the beaten path. Discover the most intriguing places to experience food, culture, adventure, and history in Istanbul, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Antalya, and the Aegean Coast.


Lecture/Seminar

Winslow Homer: Capturing an America in Transformation

Wednesday, February 22, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

In-Person Program Only: Winslow Homer (1836–1910) has often been called America’s favorite painter. His work was both quintessentially American and quietly replete with narratives for and about people of all races and ages. Drawing on his new biography, Winslow Homer: American Passage, William R. Cross offers an illustrated look at the man behind the art and examines Homer’s role in American culture. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Course

UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Wednesday, February 22, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The 1,154 UNESCO World Heritage sites throughout the world provide fascinating glimpses into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. In a lavishly illustrated series, historian Justin M. Jacobs offers an in-depth overview of Angor Wat.


Lecture/Seminar

Wildfire: The Life and Works of Edmonia Lewis

Thursday, February 23, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Nineteenth-century artist Edmonia Lewis, the daughter of a Black man and a Native American woman, overcame poverty and racial and gender-based discrimination to become an enormously successful professional sculptor based in Rome. Art historian Nancy G. Heller discusses Lewis’s place within the broader context of American Neoclassicism and African American art history. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Course

Lunchtime with a Curator: Decorative Arts Design Series

Monday, February 27, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay as she hosts an image-rich series on decorative arts and design topics with guests. In this winter lunchtime program, Lay's guest is textile historian Natalie F. Larson, who uses primary sources to look at the variety of sleeping arrangements from slave dwellings and Indigenous populations to the homes of middle-class and upwardly aspiring Virginians.


Course

Understanding Contemporary Art: From Pop to Pluralism

Tuesday, February 28, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

The work of American artists today explores an enormous range of materials, techniques, and styles—a  pluralistic experimentation that encompasses forms from conceptual and super-realist art to environmental and performance art. Art historian Nancy G. Heller surveys the roots and later influences of radical American art from the last five decades. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)


Course

Exploring Ancient Anatolia: A Turkish Odyssey

Wednesday, March 1, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Anatolia’s colorful history has left a windfall of riches—ancient ruins, ornate Byzantine churches, supremely elegant mosques, and splendid Ottoman palaces. In an illustrated series, Serif Yenen, a Turkish-born tour guide and author, highlights the heritage and splendor of ancient Turkey through an examination of some of its cultural gems.


Course

UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Wednesday, March 1, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The 1,154 UNESCO World Heritage sites throughout the world provide fascinating glimpses into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. In a lavishly illustrated series, historian Justin M. Jacobs offers an in-depth overview of Philippine Rice Terraces of Ifugao.


Course

UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Wednesday, March 8, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The 1,154 UNESCO World Heritage sites throughout the world provide fascinating glimpses into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. In a lavishly illustrated series, historian Justin M. Jacobs offers an in-depth overview of Sacred Sites of Tibet.


Lecture/Seminar

Ancient Egypt Through its Art and Architecture

Saturday, March 11, 2023 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The secret to understanding the daily life and culture of ancient Egypt under its great rulers and pharaohs is right before our eyes—in its art and architecture. Using evidence from the most recent archaeological discoveries, Egyptian specialist Jacquelyn Williamson surveys the social and historical realities of this civilization from its early pyramids through its art created under King Akhenaten, who upended centuries of tradition to create new artistic conventions. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)


Course

Lunchtime with a Curator: Decorative Arts Design Series

Monday, March 13, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay as she hosts an image-rich series on decorative arts and design topics with guests. In this winter lunchtime program, Lay's guest is textile conservationist Julia M. Brennan, who has built cultural bridges to preserve textile heritage.


Lecture/Seminar

The Tale of Shuten Doji

Tuesday, March 14, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The 14th-century Japanese legend The Tale of Shuten Doji was a popular subject in visual and performing arts during the Edo period. Art historian Yui Suzuki examines the illustrated tale in depth, focusing on both the conventional and cryptic meanings that the artworks convey. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


Course

UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Wednesday, March 15, 2023 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The 1,154 UNESCO World Heritage sites throughout the world provide fascinating glimpses into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. In a lavishly illustrated series, historian Justin M. Jacobs offers an in-depth overview of Brasilia, the Utopian Capital of Brazil.


Lecture/Seminar

Tudor London: A Dynasty’s Imprint on History

Saturday, March 18, 2023 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The rule of three generations of Tudor monarchs became inextricably linked with the growth and identity of London as a powerful urban center. Historian Cheryl White examines how the dynasty created an indelible Tudor imprint on history—and the city—across the reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary I, and Elizabeth I.


Lecture/Seminar

Thomas Gainsborough: Beyond the Blue Boy

Thursday, March 23, 2023 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Thomas Gainsborough, one of the most important British artists of the second half of the 18th century, was also one of England’s earliest homegrown geniuses. Art historian Bonita Billman examines Gainsborough’s lush painterly technique, iconic masterworks (especially those in America), and his influence on painting. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)