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News, Politics, & Media

The Science of CBD: Anecdotes and Evidence

Products that tout the powers of CBD are popping up all over the marketplace. Join Steven Grant, a neuroscientist at the National Institutes of Health, for an examination of what research has—and more importantly, has not—discovered about this elusive chemical's potential benefits and risks.

Date of event
Thursday, February 20, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

The Constitution and Declaration of Independence: A Contrary View

Have we gotten the principles of the Declaration of Independence and Constitution all wrong? Constitutional law professor Kermit Roosevelt challenges the conventional view that these hallowed documents established our core values and tell us who we are.

Date of event
Tuesday, March 3, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

Re-examining Plato's Republic

Classicist Frederick Winter examines the continuing influence of Plato’s utopian vision of the state and how a re-examination of this key Western text provides important insights into our own era of political transformation.

Date of event
Monday, March 9, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

Ireland's Fight for Freedom

Ireland’s bitter war with the British Empire from 1919 to 1921 created the template for other independence struggles in the 20th century. Historian Kevin Matthews examines its development and tactics—and the price that Ireland paid for freedom.

Date of event
Tuesday, March 17, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

Democracy Today: A Promise in Peril

Historian Charles Ingrao discusses threats to democratic practices in this country and elsewhere today.

Date of event
Thursday, March 26, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

Forgotten No More: Rediscovering Remarkable Women

Women have been making strides in their fields that have often being overlooked, uncredited, or forgotten by time. Celebrate Women’s History Month by spending a fascinating day with four experts who bring to light an array of remarkable women who have lived in the shadows of history far too long.

Date of event
Saturday, March 28, 2020 - 9:30 a.m.

Leadership in Crisis: Defining Moments of Modern Presidencies

Leaders from Franklin Roosevelt to Donald Trump dealt with their defining moments in a variety of ways that forever changed our perceptions of them. As he surveys these responses, journalist Ken Walsh identifies what we have learned about presidential attributes and skills that matter most in trying times, and also takes a fresh look at President Trump through the prism of his crisis-filled administration.

Date of event
Tuesday, March 31, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

Extreme Weather and Climate: Adaptation in a Changing World

Meeting the shock and awe of extreme floods, droughts, storms, and fires calls for plans and action—and authoritative scientific information. Roger S. Pulwarty, the senior scientist in the physical sciences division at NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory, examines the significance and sources of that information as countries, communities, and businesses make critical decisions in response to changing weather and extreme climate trends.

Date of event
Tuesday, March 31, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

Ayn Rand: The Controversy Continues

Writer and philosopher Ayn Rand continues to be controversial years after the publication of her books The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged. Prepare for a deep dive into Rand’s complicated worldview with Onkar Ghate, a senior fellow at the Ayn Rand Institute.

Date of event
Wednesday, April 15, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

Sustainable Eating: Conscious Choices for Eating More Plants

How do we make informed food choices that are right for us and the planet—and are still delicious? Health and nutrition expert Sophie Egan leads a panel of chefs, restaurateurs, and a fellow food writer to explore how an emphasis on plant-based eating might offer one of the major answers.

Date of event
Thursday, April 16, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

The Napoleonic Wars: A Global Conflict

Austerlitz, Borodino, and Waterloo are among the places most closely associated with the era of the Napoleonic Wars. But this period of nearly continuous Franco-British conflict affected nations far beyond Europe. Historian Alexander Mikaberidze analyzes the immediate and extended consequences of the political tremors that spread as far as the Americas, Africa, India, Indonesia, and the Philippines, as well as across the Atlantic and the Indian oceans.

Date of event
Saturday, April 18, 2020 - 9:30 a.m.

The Civil War in Perspective: Our Evolving Story

Historian Stephen D. Engle traces 150 years of an ever-changing narrative of the Civil War and why we still contend with reaching an acceptable version of its legacy.

Date of event
Saturday, April 25, 2020 - 9:30 a.m.

Ancient Sparta: A Template for Modern Dictatorships

Among the ancient city-states, Sparta was the most feared, for good reason. Historian John Prevas provides an analysis of ancient Sparta’s approach to governing, drawing parallels to the modern dictatorships that echo it.  

Date of event
Monday, April 27, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

Global Climate Justice: What Does It Mean?

The question of how to meet the challenges of climate change continues to take on an increasingly larger role in the worldwide debate about the future of our planet. Olúfémi O. Táíwò, an assistant professor of political philosophy and ethics at Georgetown University, provides an overview of these issues as he examines the range of pathways that are under discussion by communities, countries, and policymakers.

Date of event
Monday, April 27, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

The Panama Canal: A Complicated Backstory

Building the Panama Canal was either a bold, decisive diplomatic stroke that claimed America’s rightful place on the world stage or a crude display of arrogance and corruption. Historian Ralph Nurnberger examines the sweep of the canal saga, with elements that include intrigue in the halls of Congress, a revolution, and Teddy Roosevelt’s vision of American global power.

Date of event
Wednesday, April 29, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.

The Rise and Fall of the Berlin Wall

The Berlin Wall, erected in 1961, divided a people and marked the tense epicenter of the Cold War. It came down in 1989, but the scars it has left have not fully gone away. Hope M. Harrison, associate professor of history and international affairs at George Washington University, examines these issues.

Date of event
Monday, May 4, 2020 - 6:45 p.m.