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Smithsonian Associates - Entertaining, Informative, Eclectic, Insightful

News, Politics, & Media

Tour
Friday, October 1, 2021 - 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. ET

From the Woman Suffrage Procession along Pennsylvania Avenue in 1913 to the massive Million Man March in 1995, Washington, D.C. was the setting for many of the most historic social and political American protests of the 20th century. Enjoy a fall walk with lecturer Dave Price and discover the stories behind the most significant of these protests.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, October 4, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. ET

In-person Program Option: In response to growing criticism that the Supreme Court has become too political, Stephen Breyer, a Supreme Court justice, asserts that the judiciary’s hard-won authority could be marred by reforms premised on the assumption of ideological bias. He argues for a way to promote better understandings of how the judiciary actually works.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, October 4, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. ET

Streaming Program Option: In response to growing criticism that the Supreme Court has become too political, Stephen Breyer, a Supreme Court justice, asserts that the judiciary’s hard-won authority could be marred by reforms premised on the assumption of ideological bias. He argues for a way to promote better understandings of how the judiciary actually works.

Tour
Tuesday, October 5, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

From the Woman Suffrage Procession along Pennsylvania Avenue in 1913 to the massive Million Man March in 1995, Washington, D.C. was the setting for many of the most historic social and political American protests of the 20th century. Enjoy a fall walk with lecturer Dave Price and discover the stories behind the most significant of these protests.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, October 13, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. ET

From day one of the Covid pandemic, Anthony Fauci has been front and center in the fight to destroy the virus. After a brief respite, the virus, in a mutated form, has created a new crisis. Join the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases as he helps us understand—from a scientific viewpoint—where we have been and what we need to know going forward.

Tour
Sunday, October 17, 2021 - 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. ET

From the Woman Suffrage Procession along Pennsylvania Avenue in 1913 to the massive Million Man March in 1995, Washington, D.C. was the setting for many of the most historic social and political American protests of the 20th century. Enjoy a fall walk with lecturer Dave Price and discover the stories behind the most significant of these protests.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, October 25, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Oprah Winfrey’s interview with Harry and Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex riveted a public desperate for distraction from the ongoing pandemic. Historian Julie Taddeo explores their withdrawal from the royal family—Megxit—and its fallout within a larger historical context, linking it to past scandals from the Georgian era through the late 20th century.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 2, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

To call Cokie Roberts a legendary journalist merely scratches the surface of the life of this bestselling author and champion for women who was a fixture on national radio and television for 40 years. Journalist, author, and educator Steve Roberts, Cokie’s husband of 53 years, reflects on her many accomplishments and how she lived each day with a devotion to helping others.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 8, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. ET

Senator Elizabeth Warren’s political outlook is grounded in the experiences of growing up in Oklahoma. She shares those valuable life lessons with the next generation of leaders—especially young girls—in her newest book, Pinkie Promises. Join Warren as she shares the inspiration behind the book, the meaning of “pinkie promises,” and what girls can achieve, even when told they cannot.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, December 1, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

Myths surrounding so-called “human races”—often used as evidence of the innate superiority or inferiority of individuals, groups, or nations—can be traced from ancient Greeks to Darwin to Nazi Germany to today. Evolutionary biologist Rui Diogo examines how scientific research and scholarship have played crucial roles in buttressing prejudice—and how false racially based beliefs still continue to color political discourse and social media.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, January 11, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Historian Allen Pietrobon takes us back to the Eisenhower era, a time before the “celebrity president.” He reveals how Sen. John F. Kennedy’s domination of the medium during the first-ever televised debate was key in his winning the presidency. Pietrobon also uses the 1960 presidential election as a lens to explore American politics and culture in this pivotal era in history.