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Smithsonian Associates - Entertaining, Informative, Eclectic, Insightful

News, Politics, & Media

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, May 18, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

A Conversation on Race, Activism, and Change

Drawing on themes from her new book State of Emergency: How We Win in the Country We Built (Atria/Black Privilege Publishing), activist and social justice leader Tamika D. Mallory is joined in a roundtable discussion about racial inequality by comedian, actress, and producer Tiffany Haddish; model and activist Emily Ratajkowski; community leader and advocate Tony Lewis Jr; and April Ryan, White House Correspondent, CNN Political Analyst, and D.C. Bureau Chief for TheGrio, who serves as moderator.

Part of the Smithsonian Women’s History Initiative, Because of Her Story

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, May 19, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

Part of CULINASIA: The Future of Asian Food in America

Opening a Southeast Asian restaurant, bar, or food business was always an uphill battle. How can they keep their doors open during a global pandemic with the doubly stacked odds of anti-Asian racism at an all-time high? In a free program, learn how a panel of Southeast Asian chefs and restaurateurs from across the country are meeting the moment.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, May 19, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

CNN anchor Jake Tapper called on his inside knowledge of Washington’s workings to write his newest period political thriller The Devil May Dance, in which Congressman Charlie Marder and his wife Margaret find themselves launched into the dark side of 1960s Hollywood on a dangerous assignment from Attorney General Robert Kennedy. Join him as he discusses mixing politicos and the Rat Pack in his book, as well as his work covering the non-fictional Washington.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, June 9, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

Part of CULINASIA: The Future of Asian Food in America

While past Asian American generations may have seen fast food as simply a means for entry-level job opportunities, children of Asian immigrants are flourishing as entrepreneurs in both fast-casual and sophisticated fine-dining restaurants and food businesses. But the persistent myths that so-called “ethnic” food is supposed to be cheap and fast endure. A panel of Asian American food professionals examines the origins of those long-held assumptions and challenge us to grapple with how we might collectively move beyond them.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

Stopping the dissemination of fake news, misinformation, and disinformation campaigns continues to be a Herculean task. An expert discusses how to identify and combat fake news—and how to resist becoming a victim of misinformation.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, June 23, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

Part of CULINASIA: The Future of Asian Food in America

In both film and popular media as well as farming and land ownership, Asian Americans have been historically underrepresented and repeatedly denied opportunities for advancement  A discussion inspired by the Oscar-nominated film Minari offers a unique opportunity to explore these themes as a panel of Asian American farmers and vintners examine the semi-autobiographical story of a Korean American farm family that embarks on a new kind of American dream.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, July 22, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Although New York City’s first Gay Pride parade in June 1971 was a key marker in the progress of LGBT+ organizing, a lesser-known pivotal moment took place in Washington, D.C., 20 years later. Nikki Lane of American University examines how the city’s home-grown Black Pride event grew into a national and international model for celebrations of community, inclusion, and diversity.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, July 27, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

Award-winning journalist Alvin Hall and social justice trainer Janée Woods Weber share personal and powerful stories they collected during their 12-day, 2,021-mile road trip from Detroit to New Orleans inspired by The Negro Motorist Green Book, the historic guide African Americans relied on to travel safely at the height of segregation and the Jim Crow era.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, July 28, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. ET

The pandemic has upended the travel industry and changed the way we explore the world. What will smart travelers need to know once we can pack our bags again? Andrea Sachs, the Washington Post’s travel writer; Pauline Frommer, editorial director of Frommer’s Guidebooks; and Karin King, deputy assistant secretary of state for overseas citizen services share the best advice and resources for staying safe, healthy, and well-informed so you can relax on your long-overdue trip.  

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, August 3, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. ET

Historian Sam Lebovic  traces the evolution of the Espionage Act to provide a new history of state secrecy today—and how it reveals American democracy’s struggles to balance security and liberty.