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All upcoming World History programs

All upcoming World History programs

Showing programs 1 to 10 of 58
Session 1 of 4
February 22, 2024

Anatolia’s colorful history has left a windfall of riches—ancient ruins, ornate Byzantine churches, supremely elegant mosques, and splendid Ottoman palaces. In an illustrated series, Serif Yenen, a Turkish-born tour guide and author, highlights the heritage and splendor of ancient Türkiye through an examination of some of its cultural gems.


February 24, 2024

Throughout its millennial history, Sicily’s complex culture, language, art and architecture, customs, and masterful cuisine have been shaped by a myriad of settlers and colonizers. In a richly illustrated day-long seminar, art historian Nigel McGilchrist, reconstructs and analyzes the intricate web that unites these disparate influences, which make Sicily for many the most seductive and fascinating destination in Europe. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)


February 26, 2024

As a framework for negotiations between Israel and Palestine, the 1993 Oslo Accords were intended to last five years. But grim conflicts have persisted for more than three decades, with genuine peace remaining elusive. Historian Ralph Nurnberger unravels the intricate web of secret diplomacy, alternating periods of hope and despair, and the conflicting goals and objectives among supporters and opponents of the Oslo Peace Process.


Session 4 of 4
February 27, 2024

The evolution of Russian art is inextricably bound to the rich cultural exchanges between East and West. In a 4-part series, art historian Aneta Georgievska-Shine traces this fascinating blend of diverse visual languages and styles, from the late-medieval icons and frescos indebted to Byzantium to the great avant-garde experiments of the early part of the 20th century that developed alongside the currents of European modernism. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)


Session 1 of 3
February 28, 2024

Is it possible that Neoclassicism, with its focus on order and the enduring values of Greece and Rome, can co-exist with Romanticism, with its emphasis on exotic scenes, and studies of sublime nature? Yes it can—and did—in the 18th- and 19th-century art world. Art historian Joseph Paul Cassar explores the artistic and cultural highlights of Neoclassicism and Romanticism from the Enlightenment to the Age of Revolution and the movements’ lasting impact on Western artists. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


February 28, 2024

The name Bloomsbury conjures up an image of early 20th-century bohemia whose literati included Virginia Woolf. But artists also were in the circle, and Woolf’s sister Vanessa Bell, critic and painter Roger Fry, Duncan Grant, and Dora Carrington formed the nucleus of visual Bloomsbury. Curator Nancy Green delves into this tight-knit group of artists and friends and their place in the pantheon of 20th-century Modernism. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)


February 28, 2024

Though it lasted for only 50 years, the Japanese empire forever changed the geopolitical balance in Asia and left a complex legacy that endures to this day. In a winter series, historian Justin M. Jacobs takes you on a thematic tour of five fascinating topics in the history of the Japanese empire. This session's focus will be on the Tokyo Zoo


Session 2 of 4
February 29, 2024

Anatolia’s colorful history has left a windfall of riches—ancient ruins, ornate Byzantine churches, supremely elegant mosques, and splendid Ottoman palaces. In an illustrated series, Serif Yenen, a Turkish-born tour guide and author, highlights the heritage and splendor of ancient Türkiye through an examination of some of its cultural gems.


February 29, 2024

During the Cold War, novels, essays, and poems could win the hearts and minds of those caught between the competing creeds of capitalism and communism. They could also lead to blacklisting, exile, imprisonment, or execution for their authors if they offended those in power. Cultural historian Duncan White introduces the key literary conflicts that animated the Cold War from the beginning of the Spanish Civil War to the collapse of the Berlin Wall.


March 2, 2024

What do Richard the Lionheart, Henry VII, and Queen Elizabeth II have in common? They came to the throne after the deaths of their fathers—and with mothers eager to be involved in the running of the country. Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger examines the relationships of kings and queens and their mothers from the 12th century to today, illustrating that although they didn’t hold official public positions, the women who rocked the royal cradle changed the course of English history.