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World History Programs
Churchill: The Man Behind the Myths

Historian Kevin Matthews discusses Winston Churchill’s tempestuous career as an army officer, war correspondent, member of Parliament, and minister in both Liberal and Conservative governments to reveal a man too often hidden by the post-World War II legends that surround him.

Date
Saturday, January 12, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Inside Shakespeare

Shakespeare created worlds out of words that have informed and shaped our language and culture for more than 400 years. Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd Stanger examines how his histories, tragedies, and comedies so insightfully capture the full spectrum of the human condition.

Date
Saturday, January 26, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
The Medieval Illuminated Manuscript: Praising God with Exquisite Beauty

Art historian Laura McCloskey examines how the monk-artists who produced sumptuous illuminated books such as the The Book of Kells and the Lindisfarne Gospels created sacred texts that were also remarkable and innovative works of art.  (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Date
Wednesday, January 30, 2019 - 6:45 p.m.
Jerusalem Through the Ages

What makes Jerusalem a unique and revered place? In an absorbing day of illustrated lectures, Jodi Magness, an archaeologist who is an expert on Jerusalem, traces how a poor, isolated mountain town became sacred to billions of followers of the three Abrahamic faiths worldwide.

Date
Saturday, February 2, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
Napoleon: The Rise and Fall of a Man Who Changed History

Tracing Napoleon’s life from its Corsican roots, through military triumphs and defeats to the final exile, historian and Napoleon scholar Alexander Mikaberidze tells the story of the French leader’s remarkable life and of the sheer determination and careful calculation that brought him to the pinnacle of power in Europe.

Date
Saturday, February 2, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
Chinese Art: From the Bronze Age to the People’s Republic

Chinese civilization has given rise to some of the world’s most remarkable artistic creations. Art historian Robert DeCaroli examines how, across the centuries, China’s social, religious, and political life have influenced transformations in its material culture. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Date
Monday, February 4 to March 4, 2019 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. (no class Feb. 18)
Along the Coast of Many Cultures: Art and Architectural Treasures of Croatia

Situated at a geographical intersection of empires, Croatia was coveted by various foreign powers for centuries, with Romans, Byzantines, Venetians, and Ottomans all leaving their mark. Art historian Aneta Georgievska-Shine examines the artistic legacy of this long and tangled history. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Date
Thursday, February 7, 2019 - 6:45 p.m.
The Rise and Fall of Alexander the Great: A New Look at an Ancient Hero

Since the Romans gave him the title of “Great” two thousand years ago, Alexander has come to be the embodiment of the ancient heroic ideal. But extensive research by historian and classics scholar John Prevas has led him to question just how great Alexander really was.

Date
Thursday, February 7, 2019 - 6:45 p.m.
Earthen Architecture of Africa: Of Buildings and Belief

For centuries in Africa, mud and earthen materials have been used to build monumental and aesthetically innovative structures. Curator Kevin Tervala explores the history behind these buildings, as well as how their architecture expresses the social and religious beliefs of the societies that created them. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Date
Tuesday, February 19, 2019 - 6:45 p.m.
Denmark's Defiance: Protecting a Nation’s Jews in WWII

In 1943, the people of Denmark—led by their king—dared to stand up for their Jewish countrymen in collective resistance to Nazi occupation. Historian Ralph Nurnberger recounts this extraordinary act of courage on the part of an entire nation under duress.

Date
Wednesday, February 20, 2019 - 6:45 p.m.
Three European Renaissances in Art: Florentine, Flemish, and Venetian

The Renaissance is conventionally seen as a single, continuously unfolding movement that transformed the thinking and the artistic vision of the West. In this day-long seminar, art historian Nigel McGilchrist traces a rich visual itinerary through a different revolution: One rooted in multiple renaissances sparked in the cities of Florence, Bruges, and Venice. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Date
Saturday, March 2, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.