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World History Programs
Churchill's Secret Army: The Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare

In 1940, Winston Churchill famously ordered his Special Operations Executive (SOE) to “set Europe ablaze.” His top-secret army of mavericks soon began a program of supporting resistance deep behind enemy lines. Learn how they not only influenced the war, but SOE’s legacy also shaped the peace in surprising—and sometimes dramatic—ways.

Date
Tuesday, October 23, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
The Future of U.S.-Russia Relations

For decades following the collapse of the Soviet Union, the U.S. and Russia established a mostly amicable relationship in order to avoid further conflict. Today, this relationship is beset by challenges. Explore the current tensions between the two key world powers, and where the relationship may be headed in this 3-session course. This session focuses on the post-Soviet era.

Date
Wednesday, October 24, 2018 - 6:00 p.m.
The Beefeater and the Birds: Meet the Tower of London’s Ravenmaster

As Halloween draws near, spend an evening with Christopher Skaife, the ravenmaster at one of the world's eeriest monuments. He’s responsible for the care of the Tower of London’s remarkable ravens, and he has some fascinating stories to share about one of the world’s most unusual jobs.

Date
Wednesday, October 24, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
Ancient Egypt's A-List: Power, Empire, and Propaganda

Egypt, one of the great superpowers of the ancient world, produced a culture and system of government that endured for more than 3,000 years. Egyptologist Jacquelyn Williamson draws from the most recent archaeological evidence to examine four of Egypt’s most influential rulers and the impact of their reigns.

Date
Saturday, October 27, 2018 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
The Future of U.S.-Russia Relations

For decades following the collapse of the Soviet Union, the U.S. and Russia established a mostly amicable relationship in order to avoid further conflict. Today, this relationship is beset by challenges. Explore the current tensions between the two key world powers, and where the relationship may be headed in this 3-session course. This session focuses on Russian propaganda.

Date
Wednesday, October 31, 2018 - 6:00 p.m.
Living with the Gods: Peoples, Objects, and Beliefs

From the earliest days of humanity, shared beliefs have shaped societies around the world. Neil MacGregor, former director of the British Museum, examines rituals, monuments, and artifacts as symbols of spiritual tenets.

Date
Thursday, November 1, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
The Putin Paradox: Popularity or Fear?

He has been criticized for restricting freedom in Russian and eradicating any real dissent and political opposition. But at home, Putin has exhibited remarkable staying power that few other democratically elected heads of state can rival. Historian George E. Munro, an expert in Russian history, explores various questions in an absorbing program that examines the case for Vladimir Putin as the leader of Russia.

Date
Thursday, November 1, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
The Magnificent Cities of Russia

Explore the history, culture, and signature sites of four great cities—Kiev (now Kyiv), Novgorod, Moscow, and St. Petersburg—with historian George E. Munro. He shows how they exercised power, celebrated religion, and fostered trade while pursuing a singular path into the present.

Date
Saturday, November 3, 2018 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
Fortresses and Fantasies: The Châteaux of the Loire Valley

The splendid structures of the Loire Valley reflect lives of opulence and intrigue. Art historian Janetta Rebold Benton showcases these romantic and historic places, and sets them in the context of French history. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Date
Saturday, November 3, 2018 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
China and Japan: A History of Empires

The influence of China and Japan on global history has been immense, and goes back further than many Americans may realize. To understand these nations in the context of the modern world, Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of history at American University, provides a comprehensive perspective on thousands of years of their pasts in an informative lecture series. This session focuses on modern Chinese history.

Date
Tuesday, November 6, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
The Jews of Spain: 1000 Years of History

After almost a millennium of harmonious existence in Spain, what had been the most populous and prosperous Jewish community in Europe ceased to exist on the Iberian Peninsula by the end of the 15th century. Author Jeffrey Gorsky traces that history—which encompasses both power and the persecutions of the Inquisition—as well as the impact of this early racial and religious discrimination on later cultures.

Date
Wednesday, November 7, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
Americans and the Holocaust: History’s Enduring Questions

The Americans and the Holocaust exhibition at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum raises many questions about the response of the international community and the U.S. to the rise of Nazism. Two experts from the museum explore the exhibition’s issues, and participants are invited to experience the exhibition after-hours.  

Date
Thursday, November 29, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
Magical Prague: The Crown of Bohemia

Lose yourself in Prague, city of a hundred spires, as cultural historian Ursula Wolfman takes you on a virtual tour along its medieval cobblestone lanes and dark passageways, past its many churches and synagogues, into the heart of a city dominated by the magnificent Hradcany, the 1,100-year-old castle complex. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Date
Thursday, November 29, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
China and Japan: A History of Empires

The influence of China and Japan on global history has been immense, and goes back further than many Americans may realize. To understand these nations in the context of the modern world, Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of history at American University, provides a comprehensive perspective on thousands of years of their pasts in an informative lecture series. This session focuses on the Japanese Empire.

Date
Tuesday, December 4, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
Fin-de Siecle Vienna: The Cradle of Modernity

As the 19th century drew to a close, Vienna was a city at the heart of a vanishing world power. It was also an incubator for some of the most important figures in the arts, letters, and philosophy: Art historian Aneta Georgievska-Shine explores the ways in which fin-de-siecle Vienna became the cradle of modernity in Central Europe. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Date
Saturday, December 8, 2018 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
The Cambridge Five: Soviet Intelligence Spies

Why would a group of young men from one of England’s elite universities betray their country for Russia? Using recently declassified British, American, and Soviet intelligence records, Historian and author Calder Walton examines the lives, motivations, damage, and legacy of the notorious Cold War operatives that came to be known as the Cambridge Five.

Date
Tuesday, December 11, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
A Tudor Christmas Celebration

Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd Stanger provides a colorful glimpse into how members of the Tudor dynasty and their courtiers marked the festive season with midwinter merrymaking fit for a king (or queen). Afterward, enjoy a Tudor-inspired holiday “feast.”

Date
Wednesday, December 12, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.