What's New?
The Historic C&O Canal
All-Day Tour

Today, the C&O Canal National Historical Park is the ninth-most-visited site within the National Park System, with more visitors annually than signature parks like Yellowstone, Yosemite, or the Grand Canyon. Spend a summer day along—and on the C&O Canal, learning about its colorful history—and meeting several of its charismatic mules!

Date
Thursday, August 31, 2017 - 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Sharks: On Assignment with Brian Skerry

With his work on view at the exhibition titled Sharks at the National Geographic Museum, award-winning photojournalist Brian Skerry reveals how he captured his amazing images and shares stories of witnessing some of the most beautiful, diverse, and threatened ocean ecosystems on the planet.

Date
Wednesday, September 6, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Alex Guarnaschelli: The Home Cook

Alex Guarnaschelli’s mother edited the seminal 1997 edition of The Joy of Cooking, which defined the food of the late 20th century. Now the accomplished chef and author talks about her new cookbook, The Home Cook, with recipes that reflect the way we eat today.

Date
Tuesday, October 3, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
How Do We Listen?: Conversations in Music with Aaron Diehl and Murray Horwitz

Virtuoso jazz pianist and composer Aaron Diehl teams with Tony Award-winning playwright and lyricist Murray Horwitz for three entertaining and enlightening excursions into the building blocks of music. Tonight's program focuses on rhythm.

Date
Tuesday, October 3, 2017 - 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
The Sputnik Years

When a Russian rocket lofted Sputnik 1 into orbit on October 4, 1957, the Space Age—and the Space Race—had begun. Explore the events leading up to Sputnik's launch, the political fallout that led to America's response (Explorer 1), the formation of NASA, and the role that everyday citizens played in tracking the first satellites.

Date
Wednesday, October 4, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
What Dinosaurs Tell Us

What can long-dead animals teach us? Plenty, according to paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara—including helping us to understand the planet’s geological origins, the nature of deep time, the meaning of fossils, and our own place on Earth.

Date
Thursday, October 5, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Journalists on Journalism
4-Session Evening Course

Not since the Watergate era have journalists—for better or worse—been front and center in our political debates. In this timely series, get an inside look at today's news business from acclaimed journalists Lesley Stahl, Jim VandeHei, Mara Liasson, and Jim Lehrer.

Date
Thursday, October 5 to 26, 2017 – 7:00 p.m. to 8:15 p.m.
Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater
All-Day Tour

Led by tour leader Bill Keene, explore spectacular Fallingwater, Frank Lloyd Wright’s masterwork of organic architecture and only remaining major residence with its setting, original furnishings, and artworks intact. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Date
Saturday, October 7, 2017 - 8:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
Masterworks of Five Centuries 2017-2018 Saturday Concert Series

The Smithsonian Chamber Music Society features musical masterpieces from the 17th to the early 21st century, played by outstanding ensembles on some of the world’s most highly prized musical instruments. This is a six-concert series. This option features Saturday dates.

Date
Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017; Jan. 13, 2018; Jan. 20, 2018; Jan. 27, 2018; April 14, 2018; and May 5, 2018

Pre-concert lecture: 6:30 p.m.
Concert: 7:30 p.m.
Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz International Piano Competition Semifinals

FREE EVENT: Come and hear some of the world's most talented young jazz pianists performing for an illustrious judging panel as they take part in this world-famous musical competition. Note: Ticket distribution will occur at the door on Monday, October 9, 2017 starting at 12 noon.

Date
Monday, October 9, 2017 - 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
A Sweet Afternoon with Yotam Ottolenghi

London-based chef and restauranteur Yotam Ottolenghi and pastry chef Helen Goh share the secrets for making the delicious baked goods, desserts, and confections collected in their new cookbook, Sweet.

Date
Monday, October 9, 2017 - 2:00 p.m.
Sally Quinn: On Life, Love and Spirituality

Celebrated journalist Sally Quinn's life is also the story of modern Washington during some of its most turbulent years. This evening, Quinn sits down for a wide-ranging interview with Washington Post associate editor Bob Woodward and journalist and author Elsa Walsh.

Date
Tuesday, October 10, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Looking Toward Asia: Perspectives from Foreign Service Experts
4-Session Evening Course

For centuries, relations between the United States and Asia have been in a constant state of change. American Foreign Service experts offer timely perspectives on our engagement with Asia’s major power players.

Date
Wednesday, October 11 to November 1, 2017 – 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
De-extinction: Genomic Engineering of Mammoth Proportions

Geneticist George Church, one of the founders of the Human Genome Project, discusses how research into DNA sequencing might hold the key to bringing back the woolly mammoth. Author Ben Mezrich, who has chronicled the project in a book, and Scott Stossel, editor of The Atlantic magazine, are part of the conversation.

Date
Wednesday, October 11, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
In the Indian Kitchen

Join food writer Monica Bhide on a deliciously informative tour of India’s more than 35 regional cuisines. Savor the secrets of curry and the karma of Ayurvedic cooking, among other tasty topics. A buffet reception ends the evening.

Date
Thursday, October 12, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Kayaking the Potomac: A New View of the Capital
Weekend Tour

Experience some of Washington’s most distinctive landmarks from a different perspective—a kayak on the Potomac. Judy Lathrop, a certified interpretive guide and kayak instructor, weaves together urban, cultural, and natural history to create a unique portrait of the capital city, its people, and its most famous river. 

Date
Saturday, October 14, 2017 - 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Matisse and Picasso: Artistic Rivalry and Mutual Inspiration

In this richly illustrated daylong program, explore the important works made by both of these seminal artists, and how their mutual influence, respect, and rivalry served to make each other’s work richer. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Date
Saturday, October 14, 2017 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
Make the Most of Your Memory: The Science and Strategies You Need To Remember

Memory is critical to every insight and idea we will ever have. And the better memory is, the better the mind functions. Peter Vishton, associate professor in the department of psychology at William and Mary, shares the science of how human memory functions and how we can enhance memory and reduce forgetfulness.

Date
Saturday, October 14, 2017 - 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Tales and Tombstones: Walk in Rock Creek Cemetery
Weekend Tour

Rock Creek Cemetery is one of the area’s most historic sites, a place that tells eloquent stories about the past. Historian and guide Jeanne Fogle leads a walking tour—and tells some of those tales.

Date
Saturday, October 14, 2017 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Tales and Tombstones: Walk in Rock Creek Cemetery
Weekend Tour

Rock Creek Cemetery is one of the area’s most historic sites, a place that tells eloquent stories about the past. Historian and guide Jeanne Fogle leads a walking tour—and tells some of those tales.

Date
Saturday, October 14, 2017 - 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Kayaking the Potomac: A New View of the Capital
Weekend Tour

Experience some of Washington’s most distinctive landmarks from a different perspective—a kayak on the Potomac. Judy Lathrop, a certified interpretive guide and kayak instructor, weaves together urban, cultural, and natural history to create a unique portrait of the capital city, its people, and its most famous river. 

Date
Saturday, October 14, 2017 - 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
The Battle of Cedar Creek
All-Day Tour

Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley was both a crucial invasion route and the breadbasket for the Confederacy during the Civil War, and as a result, it was a much-fought-over region. Join author and historian Garrett Peck on a daylong tour of the last major battle in the Shenandoah Valley.

Date
Sunday, October 15, 2017 - 8:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Kayaking the Potomac: A New View of the Capital
Weekend Tour

Experience some of Washington’s most distinctive landmarks from a different perspective—a kayak on the Potomac. Judy Lathrop, a certified interpretive guide and kayak instructor, weaves together urban, cultural, and natural history to create a unique portrait of the capital city, its people, and its most famous river. 

Date
Sunday, October 15, 2017 - 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Tales and Tombstones: Walk in Arlington National Cemetery
Weekend Tour

Arlington National Cemetery is one of the area’s most historic sites, a place that tells eloquent stories about the past. Historian and guide Jeanne Fogle leads a walking tour—and tells some of those tales.

Date
Sunday, October 15, 2017 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Tales and Tombstones: Walk in Arlington National Cemetery
Weekend Tour

Arlington National Cemetery is one of the area’s most historic sites, a place that tells eloquent stories about the past. Historian and guide Jeanne Fogle leads a walking tour—and tells some of those tales.

Date
Sunday, October 15, 2017 - 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Kayaking the Potomac: A New View of the Capital
Weekend Tour

Experience some of Washington’s most distinctive landmarks from a different perspective—a kayak on the Potomac. Judy Lathrop, a certified interpretive guide and kayak instructor, weaves together urban, cultural, and natural history to create a unique portrait of the capital city, its people, and its most famous river. 

Date
Sunday, October 15, 2017 - 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
The Emerson String Quartet 2017-2018 Concert Series

The 2017–­18 season marks the Emerson String Quartet’s 38th year in residence at the Smithsonian. In this concert, the Grammy Award-winning ensemble performs masterworks by Purcell, Britten, and Shostakovich.

Date
Sunday, October 15, 2017 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
The Wit, Works, and Woes of Oscar Wilde

On the anniversary of playwright, poet, and novelist Oscar Wilde’s birthday, explore the complex man who declared that he put his talent into his writings and his genius into his life. Afterward, enjoy a slice of birthday cake and a glass of sherry and raise a toast to the man who wrote, “I think that God, in creating man, somewhat overestimated his ability.”

Date
Monday, October 16, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Chinese Art: From the Bronze Age to the People’s Republic
4-Session Evening Course

Chinese civilization has given rise to some of the world’s most remarkable artistic creations. Art historian Robert DeCaroli examines how, across the centuries, China’s social, religious, and political life have influenced transformations in its material culture. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Date
Monday, October 16 to November 6, 2017 – 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m.
Puccini: A Deeper Look
6-Session Daytime Course

Giacomo Puccini (1858–1924) is the most popular of all the operatic masters. Through films and recordings, Saul Lilienstein delves beyond the familiar to examine fascinating aspects of the life, career, and creative genius of this most famed of opera composers.  

Date
Tuesday, October 17 to November 21, 2017 – 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
String Theory Explained

In the last few decades, scientists have come to believe they have found the key that finally unlocks the secrets of the universe—dangling from something called string theory. Professor of physics Steven Gubser explains how string theory relates to the forces that drive the universe and also to the real world.

Date
Tuesday, October 17, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Mindshift: Learning How To Learn

This evening, Barbara Oakley shares insights into how everyone can learn how to learn, no matter your age or stage of life.  You’ll walk away with practical tools based on solid research—and you’ll have fun along the way!

Date
Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
The Romanov Dynasty: Tracing the Path of Triumph and Downfall

After enduring for so long, what made the Romanov dynasty vulnerable to come tumbling down exactly a hundred years ago? Historian George Munro examines the policies of the rulers most responsible for the dynasty’s success in its first two centuries and explores the factors that brought about its ultimate tragic loss of power.

Date
Thursday, October 19, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Untangling the Legend of Lionheart

Was Lionheart a brave warrior and a hero of the tales of Robin Hood or a vicious killer and failed monarch? The truth about King Richard I is plucked from the tangle of legends in this entertaining program.   

Date
Thursday, October 19, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Washington’s Mosaics: Treasures in Unexpected Places
All-Day Tour

Join mosaic artist Bonnie Fitzgerald for an inside look at a variety of mosaic treasures at notable public sites, contemporary spaces, and federal and private buildings that contain unexpected gems. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Date
Friday, October 20, 2017 - 8:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Chasing the Ghost of the China Clipper
All-Day Tour

Led by transportation expert Scott Hercik, learn about the beginning of trans-Pacific commercial aviation and the four-engine flying boats, the legendary Clipper line that pioneered the launch, during this visit to the Glenn L. Martin Maryland Aviation Museum.

Date
Saturday, October 21, 2017 - 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Portugal’s Golden Ages: An Artistic and Cultural Mosaic

Portugal’s famous voyages of exploration in the 15th century led to the creation of global maritime trading empires in Asia, Africa, and Brazil and fabulous wealth in the homeland. Art historian Lawrence Butler explores the art and architecture of Portugal and its dependencies during several of the country’s golden ages. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Date
Saturday, October 21, 2017 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
The Russia That Just Won’t Go Away: What Is This Eternal Survivor’s Secret?

What is it about Russia and Russians that has allowed them to survive seemingly insurmountable obstacles over the centuries? In a fascinating and informative daylong program, historian George E. Munro explores the nature of each of the crises that Russia has faced and considers how it was that state and society managed to hold together.

Date
Saturday, October 21, 2017 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
Tea with a Bookseller: Previews of the Newest Mystery and Suspense Titles

Washington is home to excellent local bookstores serving every kind of literary taste. In the first of a new monthly series in which local booksellers preview upcoming titles, Eileen McGervey, owner of One More Page Books in Arlington, investigates the newest crop of mystery and suspense titles. (Tea, sherry, and cookies round out each session.)

Date
Sunday, October 22, 2017 - 4:00 p.m.
Masterworks of Five Centuries 2017-2018 Sunday Concert Series

The Smithsonian Chamber Music Society features musical masterpieces from the 17th to the early 21st century, played by outstanding ensembles on some of the world’s most highly prized musical instruments. This is a six-concert series. This option features Sunday dates.

Date
Sunday, Oct. 22, 2017; Dec. 10, 2017; Jan. 14, 2018; Jan. 28, 2018; Feb. 25, 2018; and April 15, 2018

Pre-concert lecture: 6:30 p.m.
Concert: 7:30 p.m.
How Manhattan Became an Isle of Joy

Historian Mike Wallace takes a fascinating look at the confluence of social, economic, and creative forces that transformed New York City in the 1920s into a cultural mecca. From the Metropolitan Museum of Art to the rides at Coney Island, there was something for everyone.

Date
Monday, October 23, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
How the Brain Works

Neuroscientist Moran Cerf looks at how the brain influences behavior, emotion, decision-making, and dreams. He also offers a new perspective on how much free will we have.

Date
Tuesday, October 24, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Art of the Medieval World: Cathedrals and Beyond
4-Session Daytime Course

Independent art historian Judy Scott Feldman examines the art and architecture of the 1,000-year period between classical antiquity and the Renaissance, and its relationship to a society infused with faith and spirituality. (Word Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Date
Wednesday, October 25 to November 15, 2017 – 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Jane Austen: From the Parlor to Politics

This year marks the 200th anniversary of the death of Jane Austen. The passing years have increased her novels’ appeal as Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy, the Dashwood sisters, and Emma Woodhouse and Mr. Knightley continue to delight us. Discover how Austen introduced the realities of Regency England into her carefully crafted worlds.

Date
Thursday, October 26, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
The Evolution of Alice Waters: How American Cuisine Found Its Way

When Alice Waters opened restaurant Chez Panisse in Berkeley, California, in 1971, no one ever anticipated the indelible mark it would leave on the culinary landscape. Tonight, Waters talks about her evolution from follower to activist who effects change on a global level through the common bond of food.

Date
Thursday, October 26, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
A Spectacular Day at Hawk Mountain Sanctuary
All-Day Tour

Spend a day at the Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, the world’s first refuge for birds of prey and an international center for raptor conservation, for a chance to see eagles, falcons, hawks, and osprey soaring high over a mountaintop preserve aglow with fall foliage.

Date
Friday, October 27, 2017 - 7:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
From Neoclassicism to Romanticism

Neoclassicism focused on order and the enduring values of Greece and Rome. Romanticism embraced exotic scenes and studies of nature. Art historian Joseph Cassar explores the artistic and cultural highlights of the two movements, from the Enlightenment to the age of revolutions, and their lasting impact on Western artists. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Date
Saturday, October 28, 2017 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
In Search of Ancient Israel

Step back in history with biblical scholar Gary Rendsburg as he presents a fascinating overview of new findings about the world of ancient Israel. Learn about archaeological excavation and exploration in the Holy Land and what has been revealed about the people, culture, society, and religion of that ancient land.

Date
Saturday, October 28, 2017 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
Mummies and Their Mysteries: Kings to Crocodiles to Eva Peron

The practice of mummification dates back thousands of years. Egyptologist Bob Brier (also known as Mr. Mummy), discusses the history of mummies from ancient to modern times, and looks at the lighter side of the subject in popular entertainment and books.

Date
Saturday, October 28, 2017 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
The Potomac Eagle: A Rail Ride Through the Trough
All-Day Tour

Squeezed between two Appalachian ridges, the south branch of the Potomac cuts through a narrow wooded West Virginia canyon known as the Trough. Traverse it with rail historian Joe Nevin on a tour that includes a 3 1/2-hour excursion on the diesel-powered Potomac Eagle along the route of the South Branch Valley Railroad from Petersburg to Romney.

Date
Saturday, October 28, 2017 - 10:00 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
Urban Farming in DC: Rooftop Garden Tour and Workshop at H Street Farms

Niraj Ray of Cultivate the City, a District-based organization of urban farmers, offers a look at creative solutions to growing your own food or beautifying your small space. Bring home your own herb plantings to give you a head start.

Date
Sunday, October 29, 2017 - 2:00 p.m.
The Secret Revolution: Espionage, 1776 Style

Learn how George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, and other leaders of the American Revolution used espionage, covert action, and other techniques to trick the British.  David Robarge, chief historian at the CIA, explores the secrets of the Revolutionary War.

Date
Monday, October 30, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Written Out of History

In the earliest days of our nation, a handful of unsung heroes—including women, slaves, and an Iroquois chief—pioneered the ideas that led to the Bill of Rights, the separation of powers, and the eventual abolition of slavery. Their largely forgotten stories are given a deserved airing by Utah Sen. Mike Lee.

Date
Wednesday, November 1, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
The Incomparable Ella: A 100th Birthday Tribute

John Edward Hasse, curator of the current Smithsonian exhibition Ella Fitzgerald at 100: First Lady of Song, draws on film and video clips, rare photographs, and original recordings  to provide insight into the extraordinary life and career of Ella Fitzgerald.

Date
Thursday, November 2, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Analyzing President Trump’s First Year: Twelve Months Unlike Any Other

On the 1-year anniversary of Donald Trump’s election, experts from media and politics offer a measured examination of the changes President Trump has brought and how the political landscape has changed in 12 tumultuous months.

Date
Thursday, November 2, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Harpers Ferry: American History in Brilliant Color
All-Day Tour

Grab your hiking boots and camera and take in the autumn beauty—and the local history—during an excursion led by historian Garrett Peck.

Date
Saturday, November 4, 2017 - 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Traditional Roots of Modern China: How an Ancient World View Drives Contemporary Policies

In a timely daylong program, China scholar Robert Daly traces China’s 21st-century drive for wealth, power, and status to the beliefs, geographic influences, and social and cultural practices rooted in the earliest dynasties.

Date
Saturday, November 4, 2017 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
Visual Literacy: The Art of Seeing

In an illustrated daylong program, art historian Lisa Passaglia Bauman explains how art communicates, how to analyze and interpret it, and how it reveals something about the society that produced it. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Date
Saturday, November 4, 2017 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
The Black Sea: Civilizations at the Crossroads of Europe and Asia

From antiquity to our own day, the Black Sea has been a crossroads of civilizations and is still a bridge between Europe and the Middle East and between the cultures of Eastern Orthodox Christianity and Islam. Spend a day drawn into its turbulent past and present.

Date
Saturday, November 4, 2017 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Tiffany at the Corning Museum of Glass
4-Day Tour

The stunning exhibition Tiffany’s Glass Mosaics is the centerpiece of a glass-lover’s dream visit to Corning. The four-day tour, led by museum education consultant Sheila Pinsker, offers participants a true insider’s experience and many curator-conducted sessions. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Date
Depart: Wednesday, November 8, 2017 - 7:00 a.m.
Return: Saturday, November 11, 2017 - 8:30 p.m.
From Swamp to Swank: A Walk Through Washington’s Gilded Age
Morning Tour

A guided walk through the Dupont Circle neighborhood provides glimpses of Washington’s social and architectural emergence from the post-Civil War years into the Gilded Age. Pass grand homes and visit other residences of the era including Heurich House and Anderson House.

Date
Wednesday, November 8, 2017 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Jacques Pepin: Cooking for the Love of It

For years, legendary cook, teacher, and host Jacques Pepin has made it look easy. Now, he has a new kitchen apprentice: his granddaughter, 13-year-old Shorey Wesen. Listen to a delightful conversation as Pepin and Shorey sit down with Joe Yonan, food editor of the Washington Post.

Date
Friday, November 10, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
From Swamp to Swank: A Walk Through Washington’s Gilded Age
Morning Tour

A guided walk through the Dupont Circle neighborhood provides glimpses of Washington’s social and architectural emergence from the post-Civil War years into the Gilded Age. Pass grand homes and visit other residences of the era including Heurich House and Anderson House.

Date
Saturday, November 11, 2017 - 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
The Axelrod String Quartet 2017-2018 Saturday Concert Series

Smithsonian Chamber Music Society audiences are privy to the unparalleled experience of hearing two magnificent quartets of instruments—one made by Antonio Stradivari, the other by his teacher Nicolo Amati—in this popular three-concert series. This option features Saturday dates.

Date
Saturday, November 11, 2017 - 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
The Axelrod String Quartet 2017-2018 Sunday Concert Series

Smithsonian Chamber Music Society audiences are privy to the unparalleled experience of hearing two magnificent quartets of instruments—one made by Antonio Stradivari, the other by his teacher Nicolo Amati—in this popular three-concert series. This option features Sunday dates.

Date
Sunday, November 12, 2017 - 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
The Norman Invasion: William’s Unlikely Conquest

The 1066 invasion and occupation of England led by Duke William II of Normandy changed the course of history. But the Norman Conquest never should have succeeded. Historian Jennifer Paxton sets the scene for this unlikely triumph for France, and how its after-effects echo through the centuries.

Date
Monday, November 13, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Gilbert and Sullivan and the Savoy Tradition

In this lively evening, Steinway artist and musical theater expert Robert Wyatt draws on musical recordings and film clips to introduce this legendary theatrical duo and the cultural and societal trends that informed their work. A performance by members of the Georgetown Gilbert and Sullivan Society adds to the Savoyard delights.

Date
Tuesday, November 14, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
From Swamp to Swank: A Walk Through Washington’s Gilded Age
Morning Tour

A guided walk through the Dupont Circle neighborhood provides glimpses of Washington’s social and architectural emergence from the post-Civil War years into the Gilded Age. Pass grand homes and visit other residences of the era including Heurich House and Anderson House.

Date
Friday, November 17, 2017 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
What Makes It Great? with Rob Kapilow

Congenial music educator and commentator Rob Kapilow is back for another delightful season, opening peoples’ ears—and minds—to what it is that makes a piece of music a masterpiece. Tonight's performance features Beethoven.

Date
Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
The Emerson String Quartet 2017-2018 Concert Series

The 2017–­18 season marks the Emerson String Quartet’s 38th year in residence at the Smithsonian. In this concert, the Grammy Award-winning ensemble performs masterworks by Beethoven and Shostakovich.

Date
Sunday, December 3, 2017 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Radio City Music Hall: Front and Center for the Christmas Spectacular
All-Day Tour

There’s no more iconic holiday performance in New York than Radio City Music Hall’s famed Christmas Spectacular. And there’s no better way to see the precision dancing of the Rockettes than from prime orchestra seats in the fabulous art deco theater where the show has been a tradition since 1933. A behind-the-scenes tour of the Music Hall adds to the experience.

Date
Wednesday, December 6, 2017 - 6:45 a.m. to 11:00 p.m.
The Emerson String Quartet 2017-2018 Concert Series

The 2017–­18 season marks the Emerson String Quartet’s 38th year in residence at the Smithsonian. In this concert, cellist Paul Watkins performs a solo recital.

Date
Sunday, January 7, 2018 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
How Do We Listen?: Conversations in Music with Aaron Diehl and Murray Horwitz

Virtuoso jazz pianist and composer Aaron Diehl teams with Tony Award-winning playwright and lyricist Murray Horwitz for three entertaining and enlightening excursions into the building blocks of music. Tonight's program focuses on melody.

Date
Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
What Makes It Great? with Rob Kapilow

Congenial music educator and commentator Rob Kapilow is back for another delightful season, opening peoples’ ears—and minds—to what it is that makes a piece of music a masterpiece. Tonight's performance features Tchaikovsky.

Date
Sunday, March 4, 2018 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
How Do We Listen?: Conversations in Music with Aaron Diehl and Murray Horwitz

Virtuoso jazz pianist and composer Aaron Diehl teams with Tony Award-winning playwright and lyricist Murray Horwitz for three entertaining and enlightening excursions into the building blocks of music. Tonight's program focuses on harmony.

Date
Thursday, March 8, 2018 - 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
What Makes It Great? with Rob Kapilow

Congenial music educator and commentator Rob Kapilow is back for another delightful season, opening peoples’ ears—and minds—to what it is that makes a piece of music a masterpiece. Tonight's performance features the Bernstein Songbook.

Date
Sunday, April 22, 2018 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.