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Smithsonian Associates - Entertaining, Informative, Eclectic, Insightful

Inside Science: Universe

Course

The Private Space Industry Revolution

Friday, September 9, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

We’re living through a revolution in the private space industry, but with the potential for increased light pollution, satellite collisions, and the formation of “mega-constellations” of satellites in Earth’s orbit, do the pros outweigh the cons of this explosive growth? Leading astronomers and pioneers in the private space industry weigh in on the future in a fascinating four-part series presented in cooperation with George Mason University Observatory. This session showcases space policy issues.

Course

The Private Space Industry Revolution

Friday, September 16, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

We’re living through a revolution in the private space industry, but with the potential for increased light pollution, satellite collisions, and the formation of “mega-constellations” of satellites in Earth’s orbit, do the pros outweigh the cons of this explosive growth? Leading astronomers and pioneers in the private space industry weigh in on the future in a fascinating four-part series presented in cooperation with George Mason University Observatory. This session showcases the vulnerabilities of the night sky.

Lecture/Seminar

Sean Carroll: Demystifying Physics

Wednesday, September 21, 2022 - 7:30 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

Someone has to be the go-to explainer of mind-bending equations in physics. Sean Carroll is that person, offering deep insights into the workings of the universe—and making it comprehensible. Carroll pulls back the veil of mystery cloaking the most valuable building blocks of modern science as he explains the fundamental ideas informing the modern physics of reality.

Course

The Private Space Industry Revolution

Friday, September 23, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

We’re living through a revolution in the private space industry, but with the potential for increased light pollution, satellite collisions, and the formation of “mega-constellations” of satellites in Earth’s orbit, do the pros outweigh the cons of this explosive growth? Leading astronomers and pioneers in the private space industry weigh in on the future in a fascinating four-part series presented in cooperation with George Mason University Observatory. This session showcases mega-constellations.

Lecture/Seminar

Extinctions on Earth: Then and Now

Tuesday, September 27, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Andrew H. Knoll, a professor of natural history and earth and planetary sciences at Harvard University, discusses the five moments over the past 500 million years when most of Earth’s animal species disappeared, how those past events relate to 21st-century global change, and what lessons may be learned for preserving our planet’s precious and precarious biodiversity for future generations.

Course

The Private Space Industry Revolution

Friday, September 30, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

We’re living through a revolution in the private space industry, but with the potential for increased light pollution, satellite collisions, and the formation of “mega-constellations” of satellites in Earth’s orbit, do the pros outweigh the cons of this explosive growth? Leading astronomers and pioneers in the private space industry weigh in on the future in a fascinating four-part series presented in cooperation with George Mason University Observatory. This session showcases SpaceX and the commerical space industry.

Lecture/Seminar

Is God a Mathematician?

Thursday, October 13, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

From ancient times to the present scientists and philosophers have marveled at how such a seemingly abstract discipline as mathematics, which appears to have been a product of human thought, could so perfectly explain the natural world. In a fascinating presentation, astrophysicist Mario Livio explores why mathematics is a powerful lens through which to examine the cosmos.

Lecture/Seminar

The Search for Life Beyond Earth

Wednesday, November 16, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The race to remotely detect the first sign of alien life is gaining speed as technology starts to catch up to humanity’s imagination. Yet what evidence of “life”’ are we looking for? Louisa Preston of the Mullard Space Science Laboratory at University College London explores the question through the study of terrestrial biology and geology and considers predictions as to what extraterrestrial life might be like and how it might be found.