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Smithsonian Associates - Entertaining, Informative, Eclectic, Insightful

Art & Architecture

Course
Friday, June 18, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Art historian Bonita Billman introduces major artists and movements in American painting from the late 18th century to the present, revealing the connections between historical changes and artistic choices. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, June 23, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

His role as Union Army quartermaster general is well known, but Montgomery Meigs was also an engineer, architect, inventor, and patron of the arts who left an indelible impression on the face of the capital city. Historian Bill Keene offers a virtual tour of sites in the Washington area associated with Meigs in his role of engineer and architect.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, June 25, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The artist Raphael arrived in Rome in 1508 and brought a subtle revolution in art and architecture to the Eternal City. Join art historian Elaine Ruffolo for a virtual visit to the papal apartments—Stanze—Raphael painted, and revel in his virtuosity. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, June 26, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Historian and scholar Michele L. Simms-Burton, a former professor of African-American studies at Howard University examines the creators and the works that came alive during one of the most creative and intellectually productive eras in African American history, the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. ET

Art historian Aneta Georgevskia-Shine discusses ways of approaching Hieronymus Bosch (1450–1516), a unique artist who continues to fascinate us with the fantastic imagery and densely symbolic messages of his compositions. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, June 29, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The Borgias’ name has become synonymous with blind ambition, murder, rape, incest, and torture in Renaissance Italy. But there was something more to know about them, and art historian Elizabeth Lev provides a broader context to the powerful family’s story.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, July 7, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. ET

Impressionism is one of the most popular styles in the history of art. Art historian Janetta Rebold Benton presents intimate looks at four luminaries of the impressionist school.  (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, July 8, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. ET

Join Barnes Foundation educator Tom Lo for a lively virtual presentation that explores the current exhibition Soutine and de Kooning: Conversations in Art. Organized by the Barnes and the Musées d’Orsay et de l’Orangerie, it explores the affinities between the work of Chaïm Soutine (1893–1943) and Willem de Kooning (1904–1997).

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, July 9, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

As the capital of the western outpost of the Roman Empire in its last days, then of the occidental provinces of the Byzantine Empire, Ravenna offered a refuge of luxury and splendor rising above relentless seas of barbarism. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo explores the city’s extraordinary early Christian-era structures and what they reveal about an important period of European cultural history. (World Art History Certificate elective: ½ credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, July 15, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

In The 3rd of May by Francisco Goya, the brutal scene of a mass execution still manages to shock, even more than 200 years after its creation. But what does it actually depict? What were the events that so outraged Goya to create this iconic work? 

Course
Monday, July 19, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Curator Elizabeth Lay is joined by Maryhill Museum of Art’s Curator, Steven Grafe to share the story, the designs, and the backdrops that represent a collection of 172 outfits by 52 Parisian couturiers, a reminder to the world that Paris still ruled fashion in 1945 after the war. Part of a 3-session Decorative Arts summer series.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, July 21, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Early in the 20th century, Wright undertook a quest to design housing more accessible for the typical middle-class family. Historian Bill Keene examines this lesser-known aspect of the architect’s career in a program extensively illustrated with images of Wright’s houses and their plans.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, July 23, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

At its height, Renaissance Florence was a center of enormous wealth, power, and influence. Its often-violent political scene was dominated by rich mercantile families, the most famous being the Medici. Renaissance art historian Elaine Ruffolo traces the family’s influence on the city’s political, economic, and cultural history. (World Art History Certificate elective, ½ credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, July 26, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

On February 23, 1961, Jacqueline Kennedy launched the most historic and celebrated redecoration of the White House in its history. James Archer Abbott and Elaine Rice Bachmann—co-authors of a new book that chronicles the undertaking—discuss the 60-year legacy of one of the most influential interior design projects in American history.

Course
Tuesday, July 27, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Paul Glenshaw reprises four of his most popular programs from his daytime series Art + History, in which he examines great works of art in their historical context. As he explores seminal works by John Singleton Copley, Augustus Saint Gaudens, Edouard Manet, and Auguste Renoir he brings the world of the art and its creator to vivid life. (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1/2 credit.) This session focuses on Watson and the Shark by John Singleton Copley.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, July 29, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Arts journalist Richard Selden, a Baltimore resident since 2008, leads the first of several virtual visits to the city’s most historic and distinctive neighborhoods.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, July 31, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

In the late 19th century, Paris was the only place to be for any self-respecting aspiring American artist. Art historian Bonita Billman highlights the city’s ascension as the center of the art world and how it transformed the young painters who in turn transformed American art. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Course
Monday, August 2, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Curator Elizabeth Lay is joined by art historian and collector Samantha Viksnins, who delves deeper into the history of the Hermès Carré, the production process of the limited-edition scarves, and illustrates what sets the Hermès designs apart from those of other luxury scarves. Part of a 3-session Decorative Arts summer series.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, August 6, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The golden period of the Serenissima Republic is reflected in the glorious art generated for its churches, confraternities, and palaces, including works by Bellini, Tintoretto, Tiepolo, and other masters. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo traces the history of this fabled city and the art and architecture created there. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Monday, August 9, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

From colossal Olmec heads to the paintings of Frida Kahlo, Aztec temples to Mexican murals, this survey of Latin American art sweeps through the centuries. Join art historian Michele Greet, who traces the significant creators and trends that defined and shaped the arts of Latin America from their earliest expressions through the 19th and 20th centuries. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Course
Tuesday, August 10, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Paul Glenshaw reprises four of his most popular programs from his daytime series Art + History, in which he examines great works of art in their historical context. As he explores seminal works by John Singleton Copley, Augustus Saint Gaudens, Edouard Manet, and Auguste Renoir he brings the world of the art and its creator to vivid life. (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1/2 credit.) This session focuses on The Shaw Memorial by Augustus Saint Gaudens.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, August 11, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Over more than a century, three generations of Wyeths have created a collective portrait of America. Art historian Bonita Billman traces the family tradition reflected in their disparate subjects and styles. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Monday, August 16, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Curator Elizabeth Lay is joined by the daughter of the owner of Mae's Millinary shop known for its stunning "showstopper" hats, Donna Limerick, who discusses her mother’s entrepreneurial spirit, her memories of working in the shop, and shares cherished family photographs of “showstopper” hat images to view and enjoy.  She also talks about her experience working with the curators at NMAAHC to create the exhibition dedicated to her mother and her shop. Part of a 3-session Decorative Arts summer series.

Course
Tuesday, August 24, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Paul Glenshaw reprises four of his most popular programs from his daytime series Art + History, in which he examines great works of art in their historical context. As he explores seminal works by John Singleton Copley, Augustus Saint Gaudens, Edouard Manet, and Auguste Renoir he brings the world of the art and its creator to vivid life. (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1/2 credit.) This session focuses on The Railway by Edouard Manet.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, August 25, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

Today’s advanced digital technologies can provide insights into artworks, offering researchers and curators new perspectives on their elements, creation, and history.  Michael B. Toth, ‎president of R. B. Toth Associates, discusses high-tech imaging projects that revealed previously hidden aspects of artworks dating from the Renaissance to today—and the surprises encountered during investigations into a Rubens painting.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, August 27, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in the Early Renaissance, examines the style, iconography, and history of The Last Judgment and the influence that it had on later artists. 

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, August 28, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in the Early Renaissance, examines one of the most productive, yet frustrating periods of Michelangelo’s artistic career—fulfilling his commissions from the Medici popes.

Course
Tuesday, August 31, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Paul Glenshaw reprises four of his most popular programs from his daytime series Art + History, in which he examines great works of art in their historical context. As he explores seminal works by John Singleton Copley, Augustus Saint Gaudens, Edouard Manet, and Auguste Renoir he brings the world of the art and its creator to vivid life. (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1/2 credit.) This session focuses on The Burghers of Calais by Auguste Rodin.

Course
Monday, September 20, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Art historian Nancy G. Heller focuses on a quartet of Spain’s most significant painters—unearthing their sources, analyzing their principal works, discussing the critical receptions of their pictures, and demonstrating their influences on later generations of visual artists, both within and beyond the borders of Spain. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)