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Authors, Books, and Writing Programs

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Tuesday, February 9, 2016 at 6:45 PM

As part of a 4-Session Course, three celebrated novels and a play about World War I allow us to explore the suffering and tragedy at the heart of this deadly and destructive conflict more personally than any purely historical account. Susan Willens and Virginia Newmyer lead an examination of the era as depicted by authors whose disquieting stories reveal what war was really like. This session discusses the book, All Quiet on the Western Front.

Saturday, February 13, 2016 at 10:00 AM

Banish the chill of the season by basking in a day of Shakespearean magic at the Folger Shakespeare Library. The distinctive Greco-Deco building holds plenty of treasures, and special tours and behind-the-scenes sessions spotlight many of them. A matinee of A Midsummer Night’s Dream captures you in its spell.

Tuesday, February 23, 2016 at 6:45 PM

Michael B. Toth, a technology specialist who works in the preservation of cultural objects, tells the fascinating story of how he and associates digitally reunited a seminal translation of an early medical text by Galen from libraries around the globe—and what they discovered beneath the manuscript’s layers.

Saturday, February 27, 2016 at 10:00 AM

Banish the chill of the season by basking in a day of Shakespearean magic at the Folger Shakespeare Library. The distinctive Greco-Deco building holds plenty of treasures, and special tours and behind-the-scenes sessions spotlight many of them. A matinee of A Midsummer Night’s Dream captures you in its spell.

Tuesday, March 8, 2016 at 6:45 PM

As part of a 4-Session Course, three celebrated novels and a play about World War I allow us to explore the suffering and tragedy at the heart of this deadly and destructive conflict more personally than any purely historical account. Susan Willens and Virginia Newmyer lead an examination of the era as depicted by authors whose disquieting stories reveal what war was really like. This session discusses the play, Journey's End.

Tuesday, March 15, 2016 at 6:45 PM

Between them, illustrator Crockett Johnson (best known for Harold and the Purple Crayon), and writer Ruth Krauss were involved in some of the most beloved and influential children’s books of the 1950s and 60s. The couple’s involvement in leftist politics, though, garnered them a less appreciative audience: the FBI. Their biographer Philip Nel tells a fascinating tale of the intersection of art, publishing, and ideology during the Cold War.

Tuesday, April 5, 2016 at 6:45 PM

As part of a 4-Session Course, three celebrated novels and a play about World War I allow us to explore the suffering and tragedy at the heart of this deadly and destructive conflict more personally than any purely historical account. Susan Willens and Virginia Newmyer lead an examination of the era as depicted by authors whose disquieting stories reveal what war was really like. This session discusses the book, A Long Long Way.

Wednesday, April 13, 2016 at 6:45 PM

Biographer William Egginton examines Cervantes's life and the world he lived in, exploring how his work—especially Don Quixote—radically changed the nature of literature.

Tuesday, April 26, 2016 at 6:45 PM

The women on Mount Olympus may have been goddesses, but the daily lives of ancient Greek women fell far short of that ideal.  However, their portrayals in the great tragedies and comedies—from Antigone and Electra to Medea—were nothing less than heroic. Classicist Frederick Winter presents a spirited investigation of the dramatic ladies of ancient Greece. 

Friday, April 29, 2016 at 6:45 PM

Victorian literature scholar Deborah Lutz discusses her new biography, which reveals the complicated and beguiling lives of the literary Bronte sisters: Anne, Charlotte, and Emily.

Thursday, May 5, 2016 at 6:45 PM

Though his works have endured for 400 years, tastes and values change and not all of Shakespeare is easy to like. Tobias Gregory of The Catholic University of America examines five plays that pose questions of sympathy for modern audiences.

Tuesday, May 10, 2016 at 6:45 PM

As part of a 4-Session Course, three celebrated novels and a play about World War I allow us to explore the suffering and tragedy at the heart of this deadly and destructive conflict more personally than any purely historical account. Susan Willens and Virginia Newmyer lead an examination of the era as depicted by authors whose disquieting stories reveal what war was really like. This session discusses the book, Regeneration.

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