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Smithsonian Associates - Entertaining, Informative, Eclectic, Insightful

Streaming Programs

Your newest link to our world of learning

Welcome to Smithsonian Associates Streaming, a new digital platform for the high-quality, engaging and varied programs that you’ve come to expect from us.

We invite you to join us from the comfort of your home as we present individual programs, multi-part courses, studio arts classes, and virtual study tours inspired by the Smithsonian’s research, collections and exhibitions. We’re excited to present this new aspect of our 55 years as the world’s largest museum-based educational program—and to have you be an important part of our future growth.

Explore all our offerings in this month's digital program guide.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, December 2, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

The Shroud of Turin has been an object of reverence and fascination since it surfaced in mid-14th century France. Historian Cheryl White and the Rev. Peter Mangum, noted specialists in the study of the shroud, explore the mystery of this artifact through its known history and scientific findings, as well as the current state of research and scholarship. What stories held in this cloth are yet to be told?

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, December 3, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

Post-impressionism was less a negative reaction to impressionism than a desire to improve upon it. Art historian Janetta Rebold Benton presents an intimate look at the background, life, and art of four post-impressionist luminaries. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Friday, December 3, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Circular weaving is a fun and versatile technique for new weavers as well as experienced fiber artists. Learn how to warp and weave on several sizes of circle looms as you create projects from coasters to cushions to home décor.

Members-Only Program
Friday, December 3, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

In this members-only series led by veteran arts educator Roberta Gasbarre, go behind the scenes and into the working lives of some of the most intriguing people from all across the Smithsonian and Washington’s worlds of culture, science, and education. This program features mixed-media artist, Sharon Robinson.

Studio Arts Workshop
Friday, December 3, 2021 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Learn to transform a milkweed pod and its floss into a whimsical nesting swan that will add a touch of nature to your holiday décor.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, December 3, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Although its vision of a coming decade of peace, prosperity, and progress collapsed into the fires of WWII, the 1939 World’s Fair succeeded in providing a captivating glimpse into the science, technology, and innovation of the future. Historian Allen Pietrobon examines how, despite the clash of international politics, the dazzling exhibition drew huge crowds to a former Queens dumping ground transformed into Flushing Meadow.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, December 4, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The Arts and Crafts Movement was a dominant influence in visual and decorative arts and architecture in England and the United States around the turn of the last century. Art historian Bonita Billman explores the flowering and legacy of this movement. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, December 4, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

In a morning of artistic experimentation designed to deepen skills in visual expression, explore five modes of visual thinking including working from memory, observation, imagination, narrative, and experimental approaches.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, December 4, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Create four different fancy-fold cards sure to impress the people on your holiday card list! Fancy folds can be intimidating, but this workshop painlessly guides you through the steps. Detailed instructions provide you with everything you need to create future fancy folds on your own.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, December 4, 2021 - 11:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Virtually escape to Tuscany by drawing poppies with flowing organic lines, then painting the scene with mingling colors. Add interest by painting an old stone wall or sun-dappled trees. Create drama with light and shadow.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, December 4, 2021 - 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Inspired by the 6-Word Memoir Project, learn to capture quick images of personal stories in quilted wall-hangings.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, December 4, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. ET

Learn the techniques needed to create unique fine mosaic jewelry as you create beautiful silver-plate mosaic pendants using a wide variety of materials.

Studio Arts Course
Sunday, December 5, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Get the most out of your digital mirrorless or SLR camera by taking part in this workshop, which provides a solid introduction to these cameras’ features and potential.

Course
Sunday, December 5, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. ET

The notion that a picture is worth a thousand words is meant to convey the power of imagery. But what of the power of words—if they are Hemingway’s musings on a work of art, Van Gogh’s personal letters, or Michelangelo’s thoughts on his life and art expressed in his poetry? Explore the alchemy that occurs at the intersection of art and literature with David Gariff,  senior lecturer at the National Gallery of Art.  This session focuses on Ernest Hemingway, Joan Miró, and The Farm (1921-22). (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, December 5, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. ET

Taliesin, the Wisconsin home and studio of architect Frank Lloyd Wright, was witness to some of the greatest tragedies of his life, as well as some of his greatest triumphs. Join Taliesin historian Keiran Murphy as she tells the story of the iconic house and how it reflects decades of shifts in Wright's personal and professional life. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Monday, December 6, 2021 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Showcase your writing or art in a book as unique as you are. Book artist Sushmita Mazumdar guides students as they work with a variety of traditional and nontraditional materials to craft one-of-a kind storybooks.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, December 6, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

More than simply the inspiration for the poem that later became our national anthem, the War of 1812 was a watershed moment in the history of a young republic. Historian Richard Bell examines this misunderstood conflict that established the credibility of the newly formed United States and cemented American citizens’ own sense of themselves as a nation apart, emerging from the crucible of war a proud and patriotic people.

Course
Monday, December 6, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

In a 3-session evening series, historian Justin M. Jacobs presents in-depth overviews of three particularly intriguing UNESCO World Heritage sites. This session focuses on the Canadian Rocky Mountain Parks.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, December 6, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Explore a spectacular land of fire and ice in a virtual field trip led by volcanologist Kirt Kempter, who spotlights the key features that make Iceland a bucket-list destination for all geologists.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, December 7, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover the power of reflective writing guided by the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s Writing Salon, Mary Hall Surface. Experience new ways to contemplate the gifts of winter inspired by the vibrant Winter Landscape by Wassily Kandinsky, an artist who embraced the transcendent power of color.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, December 7, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

For centuries no one had been aware of the ancient Indus civilization. Today we know it was as ancient and extensive as those of Egypt and Mesopotamia. Historian and science writer Andrew Robinson introduces this tantalizing ‘lost’ civilization that uniquely combined artistic excellence, technological sophistication, and economic vigor with social egalitarianism, political freedom, and religious moderation.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, December 7, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

Duccio di Buoninsegna and Giotto di Bondone revolutionized the field of Italian painting in the 14th century. Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in the Early Renaissance, compares Duccio’s and Giotto’s art and examines the characteristics that defined their respective schools of painting. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, December 7, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

When Andrew Johnson assumed the presidency after Abraham Lincoln’s assassination, African Americans were optimistic that he would pursue aggressive federal policies for Black equality. However, author Robert S. Levine addresses the conflicts that led Frederick Douglass and the wider Black community to reject Johnson and reveals the lost promise and dire failure of Reconstruction.

Studio Arts Workshop
Wednesday, December 8, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Just in time for the holidays, create a modern wreath design with fresh evergreens on a metal hoop.  Using a method similar to floral arrangement, combine local textures, shapes, and colors in your design.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, December 8, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

The sound of their music for Broadway, films, and television defined the spirit and mood of mid-century America—and continues to captivate us. In a lively evening, pianist, raconteur, and American music specialist Robert Wyatt celebrates the lives and works of Rodgers and Hammerstein, icons of the American musical whose songs elevated the human spirit.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, December 8, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

It was a startling, unheard-of idea: to remake Shakespeare’s romantic tragedy into a musical set in the streets of New York City. Filmmaker and writer Sara Lukinson looks at West Side Story’s creators who risked everything, broke all rules, reshaped the American theater, and gave us a contemporary masterpiece, as well as how new interpretations are re-making the show for our times.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, December 9, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Although the Barnes Foundation is widely known for its post-impressionist and early modern art, its extensive African collection has long been central to the museum’s educational mission. Using high-definition Deep Zoom technology, Barnes educator Penny Hansen guides a live virtual tour that surveys highlights of these distinctive holdings. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, December 9, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Joseph Luzzi, a professor of comparative literature at Bard College, explores the fascinating world of Shakespeare through Maggie O’Farrell’s celebrated 2020 novel Hamnet. He considers the links between her fictional reconstruction of the life and tragic death of William Shakespeare’s young son and the playwright’s actual works.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, December 9, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The tumultuous friendship between George Harrison and Eric Clapton shaped not only their lives and careers but the shifting face of rock music in the early 1970s. Beatles expert Ken Womack and music historian Jason Kruppa explore the rock legends’ musical and personal collaboration, friendship, and rivalry—and a love triangle for the ages, involving Clapton, Harrison, and Harrison’s wife Pattie Boyd.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, December 9, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Pati Jinich’s newest cookbook brings together the signature recipes that Mexican home cooks, market vendors, and chefs have shared with her as she crisscrossed her native country for the past decade. Join her as she examines how these dishes represent the historic culinary diversity of the nation—and offers tips on how to bring the iconic tastes of Mexico into your own kitchen.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, December 10, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

From the sunny fields of the Mediterranean to the misty meadows of England, the history of lavender spans civilizations, centuries, and continents. Speaker and food historian Christine Rai explores lavender's role in history, art, music, literature, religion, and folklore, and how it continues to compel us today.

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, December 11, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

Take your iPhone camera skills to another level in a two-day workshop that focuses on the ProCamera app and editing techniques; organizing, printing, and posting your photos; and a critique session on images.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, December 11, 2021 - 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

No home in America celebrates the holidays quite like the White House, and behind each annual celebration is a first lady who lends her distinctive style to the festivities. Historian Coleen Christian Burke, a former White House holiday design partner, surveys the signature holiday decorating style of modern residents from Jackie Kennedy to Jill Biden.

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, December 11, 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. ET

Whether you know how to knit a scarf but not much more, used to knit but now feel rusty, or are confident in your beginning knitting skills but want to make sure you're ready for an intermediate class or project, this workshop is for you.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, December 11, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Expand your knowledge of the world of wine as you sip along with sommelier Erik Segelbaum in a tasting of wines from across the globe made under the oversight and collaboration of Château Lafite Rothschild’s head winemaker. This immersive program includes a curated personal tasting kit to enhance the experience.

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, December 12, 2021 - 4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. ET

The landscape of Florida is unlike any other in the United States. Deciduous forests give way to subtropical wetlands, savannahs, and emerald palm-lined beaches. Join interpretive naturalist and popular tour leader Keith Tomlinson on a journey around the best of the peninsula that highlights some of the best places to hike, swim, and camp.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, December 13, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Virtually join art historian and culinary expert Elaine Trigiani in her 15th-century Tuscan farmhouse for a look at Venice through its artistic and culinary heritage. Learn how Giambattista Tiepolo became the 18th-century master of the Venetian school of painting. Then, watch her demonstrate the preparation of cicchetti, a favorite snack of today’s Venetian cocktail hour scene. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, December 13, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Dylan Thomas is among the 20th century’s most romantic and tragic figures, famous not only for his lyrical, soul-stirring poetry, but also his turbulent, hard-drinking lifestyle. Join us as we “burn and rave at close of day” in a celebration of this incandescent spirit. Author Daniel Stashower explores Thomas’s life and legacy, and actor Scott Sedar offers dramatic readings of some of his most celebrated poems.

Course
Monday, December 13, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

In a 3-session evening series, historian Justin M. Jacobs presents in-depth overviews of three particularly intriguing UNESCO World Heritage sites. This session focuses on the Redwood National and State Parks.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, December 13, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Tapped by his one-time political rival Abraham Lincoln to become secretary of the treasury, Salmon P. Chase proved essential to the Civil War effort and pressed the president to emancipate the country’s slaves and recognize Black rights. Biographer Walter Stahr sheds new light on a complex and fascinating political figure, as well as on the pivotal events of the Civil War and its aftermath.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, December 14, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover the power of reflective writing guided by the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s Writing Salon, Mary Hall Surface. Experience new ways to contemplate the gifts of winter inspired by the vibrant Winter Landscape by Wassily Kandinsky, an artist who embraced the transcendent power of color.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, December 14, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

At the start of the First World War, a handful of volunteers created an all-American fighter squadron in the French Air Service, the legendary Lafayette Escadrille. Join filmmakers Paul Glenshaw and Darroch Greer, creators of a new documentary on the squadron, as they trace its beginnings, the colorful characters in it, and their motivations—some noble, some opportunistic—to risk their lives for America’s oldest ally.

Program
Tuesday, December 14, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

From the speakeasy era to the mid-1960s, “black-and-tan clubs” were a unique entertainment phenomenon: nightclubs that brought together artists and audiences of all races to celebrate the joys of jazz. Loren Schoenberg, Senior Scholar/Founding Director of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem, joins artistic director and conductor Charlie Young to provide historical context as Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra’s Small Band captures the vibrant spirit and style of the early black-and-tan clubs in song.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, December 15, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

The festivals, special foods, and spectacular customs of the holiday season last a glorious three weeks in Italy! Join food historian Francine Segan for a lively presentation on the many splendors of Christmas and New Year in Italy.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, December 16, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

Art historian Robert DeCaroli examines the sites and structures that made up the urban landscape of the Khmer Empire and traces the historical shifts, royal decisions, religious beliefs, and cultural processes that led to its development. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, December 17, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

As a young man, Leonardo da Vinci wrote about finding the skeleton of a great “fish” while roaming in the hills of Tuscany. What followed was decades of interest in fossils and informed speculation about the planet’s history. Biologist Kay Etheridge examines how this fascination with fossils is reflected in his artworks.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, December 20, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Everyone loves a holiday visit to Bedford Falls. But it took years for Frank Capra’s now-beloved film—a flop in its 1946 release—to become a Christmas classic. Lecturer Brian Rose examines the fascinating story of It’s a Wonderful Life, looking at the challenges of how it was made, its surprisingly dark portrait of small-town life, and how it evolved into the ultimate portrayal of holiday goodwill and cheer.

Course
Tuesday, January 4, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can spark creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for five online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on character.

Course
Wednesday, January 5, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

In a 4-session course, popular speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin uses her unique live piano demonstrations and both historic and contemporary film clips to illustrate how the music from such ballet masterpieces as Giselle, Swan Lake, Daphnis and Chloë, Le Sacre du Printemps, and Appalachian Spring became a treasured part of our cultural landscape.

Course
Wednesday, January 5, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Chinese civilization has given rise to some of the world’s most remarkable artistic creations. Art historian Robert DeCaroli examines how, across the centuries, social, religious, and political life have influenced transformations in China’s material culture. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, January 6, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Join Christine Rai to explore how Dutch history, geography, and climate shaped its distinct cheese styles and how cheese has played a role in the wider culture of the Netherlands. In addition to the fascinating history, she surveys how today’s Dutch cheese makers are innovating beyond their roots and shares tips and suggestions for savoring a range of delicious Dutch cheeses.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, January 7, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Rivalries can be dangerous and frustrating, but they can also fuel the creation of great works of art—as was the case among the Renaissance masters. Renaissance art historian Elaine Ruffolo brings into sharp focus the artistic rivalry among these painters and the often-overwhelming emotional and professional pressures that compelled them to create. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, January 8, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

How do we unlock the mysteries of a great poem? What are the invisible patterns and hidden music that bring words to life? Explore how the ability to read poems closely and deeply can be applied when trying to interpret the texts of other disciplines—or even the experiences of everyday life with literature professor Joseph Luzzi.

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, January 9, 2022 - 4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. ET

One of the world’s most striking natural wonders, Yosemite National Park is much more than “the valley.” Keith Tomlinson, an interpretive naturalist and popular tour leader, examines the area’s glacial history, plant life, emerging climate issues, and distinctive topography.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, January 10, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

The Founders—and their true intentions for our young nation—are often the subject of heated debates. But what do we really know about how their ideas evolved? Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Joseph Ellis explores how the complexities of the struggle helped the Founders find a way to form a new nation.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, January 10, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The romantic feminine lines and chic textured suits that emerged in Paris after the austerity of WWII are admired even today. Christian Dior’s luxurious bounty of expansive skirts with tiny wasp waists and Coco Chanel’s impeccably tailored signature suits defined the arc of fashion in the 1950s. Join design historian Elizabeth Lay as she looks at the seeds of each style, the customers who bought these marvelous designs, and the minute details of haute couture that set these fashions apart from the ordinary.

Course
Tuesday, January 11, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can spark creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for five online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on setting.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, January 11, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Historian Allen Pietrobon takes us back to the Eisenhower era, a time before the “celebrity president.” He reveals how Sen. John F. Kennedy’s domination of the medium during the first-ever televised debate was key in his winning the presidency. Pietrobon also uses the 1960 presidential election as a lens to explore American politics and culture in this pivotal era in history.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, January 12, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

PBS television host Darley Newman shares insights into the Alabama Civil Rights Trail, which traces the footsteps of civil rights legends such as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks, whose stories are told in the museums, churches, and other landmarks lining the trail. Darley suggests area guides and experts who can enhance your experience.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, January 13, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

The Barnes holds 59 of Henri Matisse’s works, including his fauvist masterpiece Le Bonheur de Vivre, and the The Dance, commissioned by collector Albert Barnes in 1930. The collection’s 46 works by Pablo Picasso range from The Peasants, which greets visitors in the main room, evolving to his Head of a Woman (Tête de femme). Barnes educator Penny Hansen uses high-definition Deep Zoom technology to explore the artists’ work and influence on 20th-century modernism. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, January 13, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

From the late 1920s through the end of World War II, Hollywood studios dominated film production both in America and throughout the world, producing some of the best-loved and most significant movies ever made. Brian Rose, a professor emeritus at Fordham University, examines the forces that shaped this giant of global filmmaking and the special nature of its achievements during its golden age—as well as the factors that brought this short-lived period to a final fadeout.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, January 13, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Baltimore's Federal Hill holds a prominent place in the city's history and lent its name to a distinctive and appealing South Baltimore neighborhood.  Arts journalist and Baltimore resident Richard Selden leads an illustrated virtual tour of both the hill itself, with its storied monuments and stunning views, and the urban village that surrounds it.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, January 13, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The saga of our home planet is far more spectacular than any Hollywood blockbuster (Boiling seas of lava! Meteor strikes! Towering sheets of ice!). But only recently have we begun to piece together the whole mystery into a coherent narrative. Andrew H. Knoll, a geologist and professor at Harvard University, offers a short biography of Earth, charting its epic 4.6-billion-year story and placing 21st-century climate change in deep context.

Course
Tuesday, January 18, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can spark creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for five online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on dialogue.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, January 18, 2022 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Get an introduction to stylized lettering, including altered block letters, botanical borders, and illuminated initials with vines and flourishes.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, January 18, 2022 - 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Learn simple and easy techniques to create land and seascape paintings. Special emphasis is given to various watercolor techniques such as wet-on-wet, wet-on-dry, and masking.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, January 18, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Popular theory on right side brain activity holds that the right brain is primarily responsible for the intuitive understanding of visual and spatial relationships. Designed to improve the way people see and record objects on paper, this class provides a set of visual exercises to help build the ability to draw.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, January 18, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Gain increased confidence in your weaving skills and take your tapestry to the next level. Knowledge of basic tapestry weaving is required.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, January 18, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The story of Jerusalem is the tale of how science, politics, and religion meet in its shadowy subterranean spaces. Journalist Andrew Lawler traces that buried history as he discusses the early explorers who navigated sewage-filled passages; follows the European, American, and Israeli archaeologists who made stunning discoveries beneath the city; and explores how these finds became essential elements in the battle to control the Holy City.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, January 19, 2022 - 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

Learn to embrace and celebrate the unpredictability, versatility, and beauty of watercolor. Class discussions cover supplies; color theory, palettes and pigment control; and various exercises and experiments to achieve different effects.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, January 19, 2022 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Whether you want to work in digital or film, this course offers a solid foundation for new photographers ready to learn the basics.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, January 19, 2022 - 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

Learn the basics of hand-stitched quilt-making—including piecing, applique, and finishing techniques—as you work on a small-scale piece that can be used as a doll quilt or a wall hanging.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, January 19, 2022 - 1:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Create your own story as you learn to upcycle book pages as surfaces for drawing, painting, and collage using gelatin plate prints, textures, photo transfers, drawing, painting, and text redaction.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, January 19, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Students are introduced to the materials, tools, and technologies used in collage and assemblage. They find inspiration in artists who worked in collage including Joseph Cornell, Romare Bearden, and Gertrude Green.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, January 19, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Whether you work digitally or on film, this course is ideal for students who are familiar with their cameras but are interested in expanding their understanding of photography fundamentals.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, January 19, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

This intermediate-level photography course offers a better understanding of compositional elements and practices—such as simplicity, balance, and natural lighting—that promote taking better and more unique photographs.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, January 19, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Biographer Bob Spitz tells the story of how Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, Robert Plant, and John Bonham came together to form the legendary rock band Led Zeppelin—one of the most successful (and certainly one of the most notorious) bands of all time.

Course
Thursday, January 20, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Using a medley of filmed performances, documentary filmmaker and cultural historian Sara Lukinson traces how some of our favorite love songs from the American songbook came to be in a 3-session winter series and how re-imaginings by different artists, unexpected arrangements, and changing times transformed them into something more. This session focuses on “My Funny Valentine” and “Someone to Watch Over Me.”

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, January 20, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Explore the basis of abstraction by studying color, line, and shape as they relate to composition. Learn to create exciting and innovative works of art, using a series of drawing and painting exercises designed to examine non-traditional ways of handling traditional materials and subject matter.

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, January 20, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Take your skills beyond auto mode as you explore a myriad of your digital camera’s exposure options and features in this course designed for intermediate photographers.

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, January 20, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Learn the fundamentals of drawing the human body through an exploration of the skeleton, planes of motion, gesture, musculature, and other key elements. Virtual anatomy software, a digital figure drawing site, and a variety of props allow students to discover how to convey motion.

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, January 20, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Take the fear out of painting figures as you learn to see the important relationships between shape and color that help to make painting figures a breeze. All levels are welcome.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, January 20, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the face of the travel industry and the criteria that guides travelers in planning their trips. Television host, writer, and producer Darley Newman shares insider’s tips and recommendations on where to travel in 2022—places that combine culture, cuisine, history, and a healthy dose of wellness and nature.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, January 21, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The Tiber River flows around the famous hills of Rome. Nourishing Rome for centuries, for the ancient Romans the river personified a majestic old man, crowned with laurel and holding a cornucopia. Some of Rome’s greatest monuments are found along its banks. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo leads an art-historical adventure along the Tiber River. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, January 21, 2022 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Expand your knowledge of the world of wine as you sip along with sommelier Erik Segelbaum in an exploration of South African wines. Part of a 3-session winter series, this immersive program includes a curated personal tasting kit to enhance the experience. 

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, January 22, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Humans are obviously part of the animal kingdom in many important ways, and yet they exhibit features and activities that set them apart from other species. Philosophy professor Michael Gorman leads a fascinating exploration into the nature of what makes us uniquely human, touching on topics including consciousness, free will, morality, and the duality of body and soul.

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, January 22, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Get the most out of your digital mirrorless or SLR camera by taking part in this workshop, which provides a solid introduction to these cameras’ features and potential.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, January 22, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

Put away your point-and-shoot camera. Learn to make the most of your iPhone’s camera, starting with essential photography basics and moving on to some of the best apps, camera accessories, and low-cost tools for editing and image management.

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, January 22, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Create a personal and powerful record of experiences by drawing and painting moments from your life that you include in your sketchbook.

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, January 22, 2022 - 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

The kolam is a daily artistic practice from southern India in which lines and dots are arranged in symmetrical patterns. Study and practice these designs and then create your very own quilted wallhanging.

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, January 22, 2022 - 1:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

Collage is an amazingly versatile art form with no limit when it comes to techniques and materials. In this beginner-level course, learn about tools, adhesives, materials, and appropriate bases for supporting a collage.

Studio Arts Course
Sunday, January 23, 2022 - 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

The beautiful decorations of religious and secular manuscripts are centuries-old Islamic traditions. Guided by a graduate of the Turquoise Mountain Institute, explore the elements of gold-leaf manuscript illumination in the Afghan tradition.

Studio Arts Course
Sunday, January 23, 2022 - 10:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. ET

A continued study of watercolor techniques provides the opportunity for greater individual experimentation and expression. Go beyond the basics of paint application, constructing strong, vibrant, personality-filled paintings.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, January 24, 2022 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

This course examines fundamental concepts of composition and their practical application in studio-art practice, offering participants tools to enrich their own work as well to analyze and appreciate visual art in general. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Monday, January 24, 2022 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Learn the basics of weaving handmade bobbin lace, from winding the bobbins to making four small lace projects.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, January 24, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

In an artist-led series designed to provide a tranquil mid-day break, create small but satisfying works of art as a way to hit “pause” and incorporate a bit of creativity into your at-home routines.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, January 24, 2022 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Colored pencil, an often-over-looked dry medium, is coming into its own. Whether used in fine art or illustration, they can enliven work with rich, vibrant color and a dizzying range of effects. Learn basic to intermediate methods and strategies with colored pencils.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, January 24, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

This introductory course teaches the basic skills needed for drawing. Working with a variety of materials and techniques, including charcoal and pencils, students explore the rendering of geometric forms, volume, and perspective, with an emphasis on personal gesture marks.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, January 24, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

You don’t necessarily need great light to make a great photo. Understand the essentials of night photography and tripods as you learn to manage longer exposure times and exposure modes and compensation, choose the right tripod, work with remote shutter-release triggers, use your camera’s self-timer, and more.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, January 24, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The popular 2017 film Dunkirk presented a vivid look at the famous evacuation of British forces from France in the spring of 1940. But as he examines the planning and execution of the desperate boatlift and analyzes its overall strategic impact on the continuing war effort, Kevin J. Weddle, a professor of military theory and strategy at the U.S. Army War College, reveals why there’s much more to Dunkirk, and why its lead-up and aftermath are just as exciting as the evacuation itself.

Course
Tuesday, January 25, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can spark creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for five online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on story.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, January 25, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Discover how to “see” abstraction in everyday objects and scenes—and then interpret it in a mosaic in classes that highlight classical mosaic technique and include work-in-progress discussion, lecture, demonstration, and in-class projects.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, January 25, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

In this class, students focus on the fundamentals of drawing birds: physical makeup (face, body, wings, and feet) and nuanced differences that distinguish one species from another.

Studio Arts Workshop
Wednesday, January 26, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Although flowers can be hard to come by in the wintertime, citrus and pomegranates are plentiful and can add color to nature's otherwise muted palette. Learn how to incorporate various fruits into your arrangements and tips on using them as part of a table-scape.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, January 26, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

This introductory course teaches the basic skills needed for drawing. Working with a variety of materials and techniques, including charcoal and pencils, students explore the rendering of geometric forms, volume, and perspective, with an emphasis on personal gesture marks.

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, January 27, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET

Beginning students as well as experienced painters explore watercolor techniques and learn new approaches to painting through demonstration, discussion, and experimentation.

Studio Arts Workshop
Thursday, January 27, 2022 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

At a very young age we began making marks on paper, but then forgot how satisfying scribbling actually can be. Beginning with some basic exploration, this class reminds students of fun techniques they haven’t thought of for a long time and provides food for future thought about what students can mark up next.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, January 27, 2022 - 6:00 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. ET

Veggies are usually the supporting culinary players in a meal, but the new Milk Street: Vegetables moves them center of the plate. Christopher Kimball shares tips on how to roast, braise, steam, and stir-fry everyday vegetables into simple but appealing dishes, and demonstrates a recipe or two from the book’s globally influenced collection.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, January 27, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

There’s no writer quite like Charles Dickens. Author and humanities scholar Clay Jenkinson uses three of his beloved novels as the basis for the serious but playful look at Dickens you’ve always wanted—an exploration of the fabulous and fantastic creativity of a timeless author who could write English prose as if it were iambic pentameter poetry.

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, January 27, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Explore the basics of color theory including temperature, value, and harmony-creating color schemes. In three hands-on projects, learn to use a color wheel with tinting and toning, color charts, and color harmony studies.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, January 29, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Historian Alexander Mikaberidze examines four historical moments crucial in the emergence of France, a country with a uniquely lengthy, dramatic, and varied history. Accept his virtual invitation to the coronation of the greatest of medieval European rulers, to fight alongside King Philippe Auguste as he confronted an English-led coalition of monarchs, to look behind the intrigues at the French royal court, and to follow Parisians as they stormed the parapets of the Bastille.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, January 29, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Use basic stitches to create an embroidered rainbow-watermelon patch to embellish a favorite jacket or pair of jeans. Learn how to prepare fabric with a simple design, then ready a hoop and begin stitching.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, January 31, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Designed for beginners who want to learn how to use their digital or mirrorless camera as a creative tool, students will gain skill in technical aspects of photography so that they can concentrate on composing beautiful images.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, January 31, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Keep a visual-thinking journal and learn to see like an artist and create personally meaningful works of art in terms of form, theme, and context. Use text, images, and newly developed visual thinking skills to create a “memoir museum”—a handmade map that traces where you’ve been in your life and where you have yet to explore.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, January 31, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Great art is timeless, and speaks to us across time, culture, and space. Yet great works come from real people living real lives. Paul Glenshaw examines Albert Bierstadt’s 1868 work Among the Sierra Nevada, California—a majestic depiction of the natural beauty of the American West that also served as part of a brazen self-marketing scheme, a lure to immigrants and settlers, and a reflection of the complex legacy of Manifest Destiny. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Tuesday, February 1, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can spark creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for five online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on first person.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, February 1, 2022 - 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

If you’ve ever wanted to paint, here’s a class that offers the perfect introduction to the art—and will have you ready to pick up your brush with confidence.

Course
Tuesday, February 1, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Our modern world echoes and even replicates the creative vestiges of the past—and the key to understanding our surroundings is through an overview of ancient material culture. Focusing on the Mediterranean region, art historian Renee Gondek offers a survey of the earliest traces of artistic production from the Paleolithic period through the late Bronze Age. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, February 1, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Virtual reality technology is advancing fast. Many predict that a "Metaverse" of virtual worlds will be the next stage of the Internet. Drawing on his new book Reality+, philosopher David Chalmers examines this technology, the nature of reality, and our place within it.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, February 2, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Why are William Shakespeare’s plays still considered essential reading? How can lessons from his Elizabethan theatrical universe help us to better understand social and political conflicts we confront today? Explore three of the Bard’s great tragedies to discover why Shakespeare remains vital and relevant.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, February 2, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Experiment with a variety of painting styles such as cubism, suprematism, and abstract expressionism to learn practical applications of the concepts and techniques of modernism. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, February 2, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Paint the sun-drenched beach of your wintertime dreams. Working with watercolors, capture the color and light of the village of Carmel-by-the-Sea—with its cypress trees, Old World architecture, and flowers and vines reaching up toward the sky.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, February 2, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Checkers, backgammon, Go, and chess. Poker, Scrabble, and bridge. These seven games, ancient and modern, fascinate millions of people worldwide. Join journalist and author Oliver Roeder as he charts their origins and historical importance, the delightful arcana of their rules, and the ways their design makes them pleasurable.

Course
Thursday, February 3, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Using a medley of filmed performances, documentary filmmaker and cultural historian Sara Lukinson traces how some of our favorite love songs from the American songbook came to be in a 3-session winter series and how re-imaginings by different artists, unexpected arrangements, and changing times transformed them into something more. This session focuses on "Autumn Leaves," "Send in the Clowns," and "This Nearly Was Mine."

Course
Thursday, February 3, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

For centuries, the English monarchy was male, but several notable women shattered that royal glass ceiling. Tudor scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger leads an assumption-challenging survey of female reigns, from the first crowned queen of England to the record-breaking longevity of Elizabeth II, examining how each redefined the role of the ruler and nature of the monarchy.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 3, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

General Black Jack Pershing’s 1916 “Punitive Expedition” into Mexico was intended to capture Pancho Villa in retribution for an attack on a small New Mexico town carried out by his revolutionary forces. Although it failed in its objective, historian Dakota Springston examines how the expedition changed American warfare and why the United States’ first truly mechanized conflict served as a testing ground for the country’s entry into WWI.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, February 4, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

From the late Middle Ages to the early Renaissance, the Book of Hours, filled with groups of prayers designed for use by lay people, was more in demand than the Bible itself. Roger S. Wieck, Melvin R. Seiden curator and department head of Medieval and Renaissance manuscripts at the Morgan Library and Museum, explores the textual and pictorial riches to be found within the pages of these fascinating books. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, February 5, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The English painters, poets, and critics who gave birth to the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in 1848 wanted to reform art by rejecting what they called the melodramatic style of High Renaissance artists like Raphael. Art historian Bonita Billman traces this fascinating movement from its origins to flowering conclusion. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, February 5, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET

Art historian and photographer Patricia Howard introduces the world of the photo surrealists and explores how they pushed the boundaries of photographic imagery in the 1920s to 1940s. Create your very own surrealist collage as part of the experience. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Sunday, February 6, 2022 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

For centuries, religious and secular Islamic manuscripts have contained beautiful geometric decorations. Explore the history and construction of these traditional designs with Sughra Hussainy, a graduate of Turquoise Mountain Institute in Kabul, Afghanistan. Then, create designs with graph paper and a compass.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, February 7, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Sharpen your knowledge of focus and depth of field through in-class discussion and homework assignments. Gain a better understanding of focus modes, area modes, and hyperfocal distance/focusing. DSLR, mirrorless, and film cameras are welcome.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, February 7, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Though the guarantee of equality, liberty, and justice for all is enshrined in the Constitution, Black Americans have long confronted the gap between that promise and the realities of their lives. Join author Farah Jasmine Griffin as she examines how thinkers and leaders such as Frederick Douglass, Malcolm X, and Barack Obama vividly reflect in their works how these Americans have grappled with the founding ideals of the United States.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, February 8, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Join one of the most famous art detectives in the world to hear tales from a long FBI career solving art crimes. Drawing on the headline-making cases he worked on, Robert Wittman explores notorious art heists and daring recovery operations.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, February 9, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Brian Rose, a professor emeritus at Fordham University, examines how advertising evolved during television’s first two decades and the important role it played in convincing viewers that the key to happiness quite literally lay in buying their way into the American dream.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, February 9, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Vertebrate zoologist and author Bill Schutt traces the evolution of hearts and circulatory systems in the animal kingdom, as well as our understanding of the anatomy, physiology and symbolic significance of human hearts throughout history.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, February 9, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Nick Charles, NPR’s new chief culture editor, leads a panel discussion that examines how inequality has been propagated throughout history, the many attempts to counteract these inequalities, and necessary next steps to move forward.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 10, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

The Barnes Foundation holds the world’s largest collection of works by Paul Cézanne, some 69 pieces including his masterworks The Large Bathers and The Card Players. Barnes educator Penny Hansen uses high-definition Deep Zoom technology to explore Cézanne’s career, his reclusive life, his style, his characteristic brushstrokes, and his deep influence on 20th-century art. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 10, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Thomas Eakins spent a lifetime on a quest to create the most accurate portrayal of the human figure. Art critic and author Judy Pomeranz examines the life of this exceptional American painter and his impact on the course of art history. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 10, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Why and how do living languages change? The answer, in a word, is fascinating. Linguist and English language historian Anne Curzan leads a lively tour across the language’s shifting landscape, from Beowulf to blogging.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 10, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The emergence of genomic science in the last quarter century has revolutionized medicine, the justice system, and our understanding of who we are. Harvard University professor Jennifer Hochschild examines its politically charged and hotly contested issues.

Studio Arts Course
Friday, February 11, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Discover how to make a content calendar full of ideas that reflect your business mission; create on-brand templates for Instagram posts, carousels, stories, and reels covers using Canva; make and edit video content including reels, GIFs, and animations using Canva; and create stop-motion videos using the Lifelapse app.

Studio Arts Course
Friday, February 11, 2022 - 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Palestinian embroidery, or tatreez, is centuries-old textile art traditionally passed from mother to daughter over a cup of tea. Explore the history and evolution of traditional costuming, the transformation of the art form, and the preservation and study of Palestinian embroidery today.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, February 12, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. ET

The state of Oaxaca in Mexico, and its eponymous Spanish colonial capital city, have been important cultural crossroads from pre-Columbian times to the present day. Learn about its rich cultural history, from the domestication of maize corn more than 10,000 years ago to Oaxaca’s emergence as a contemporary international cultural center.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, February 12, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Create simply elegant greeting cards while learning tips and techniques of card making. The workshop focuses on card construction, sentiments, foreground, background, and embellishments—all components of unique personalized cards.

Course
Sunday, February 13, 2022 - 4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. ET

Indulge in a colorful midwinter escape as horticultural experts lead a series of virtual visits that highlight the beauty of notable botanical gardens. This program spotlights the Betty Ford Alpine Gardens in the Colorado Rockies and Western Australia Botanic Garden.

Course
Monday, February 14, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay and her expert guests for an image-rich lunchtime lecture series focusing on fascinating decorative arts and design topics. This session spotlights 17th and 18th century embroidered textiles in England and the American colonies. Part of a 3-session Decorative Arts winter series.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, February 14, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Nearly 50 years have passed since the publication of her final book, but Dame Agatha Christie remains the best-selling novelist of all time. Author Daniel Stashower explores Agatha Christie’s life and career while actors Scott Sedar and Bari Bern give voice to her most beloved characters. It would be a crime to miss it.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, February 15, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover the power of reflective writing guided by the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, Mary Hall Surface. Inspired by paintings of the visionary Belorussian-born French artist Marc Chagall and by poetry across time, look outward at paintings and poetry and look inward through writing.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, February 15, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

His unique voice and passionate style made Ray Charles one of the most beloved and influential musicians of our time. Music curator John Edward Hasse of the American History Museum celebrates the music, the man, and his place in our country’s cultural history.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, February 16, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Explore the spectrum of floral design. Sourcing (with a focus on sustainability), making the most of seasonal flowers, creating centerpieces, wiring techniques, bouquet-making, and photographing your work are all among the practical areas covered. 

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, February 16, 2022 - 1:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

Get the most out of your digital mirrorless or SLR camera by taking part in this workshop, which provides a solid introduction to these cameras’ features and potential.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, February 16, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Military historians try to identify “decisive” battles or campaigns that either lead directly to the end of a war or shift the momentum to the ultimate victor. In the American Civil War, the consensus is that the two most decisive battles or campaigns were Gettysburg and Vicksburg. Military historian Kevin Weddle examines another viewpoint: that the 1862 Antietam campaign should be considered equally significant as those encounters.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, February 16, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Willa Cather’s visits to Santa Fe in the 1920s with her partner, book editor Edith Lewis, inspired her to research and write the enduring novel she referred to as her best book. Author and historian Garrett Peck examines how the setting and spirit of Death Comes for the Archbishop is rooted in those travels and in their relationship.

Course
Thursday, February 17, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Using a medley of filmed performances, documentary filmmaker and cultural historian Sara Lukinson traces how some of our favorite love songs from the American songbook came to be in a 3-session winter series and how re-imaginings by different artists, unexpected arrangements, and changing times transformed them into something more. This session focuses on "What a Wonderful World" and "Smile."

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 17, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Seventy years on, the global cataclysm known as World War II, as well as its withering aftermath, continues to capture the attention and imaginations of filmmakers around the world. Drawing on a variety of clips, film expert Marc Lapadula explores how several films portray historical figures and real-life incidents that profoundly impacted and devastated lives.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 17, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

The debate in recent years about the politicization of sports may seem like a new topic, but in fact, these two arenas of American life have been connected for a long time. Drawing on fascinating historical anecdotes, historian Kenneth Cohen explores that link and offers a new perspective on the great game of American political hardball.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, February 18, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The Vatican Museums in Vatican City comprise 26 public art museums housing about 70,000 world-famous paintings and sculpture. Art historian Elizabeth Lev explores the origins of the world's first truly modern museum through the lives and times of three remarkable popes: Julius II, a visionary; Pius VI, a financier; and Pius XI, a savvy communicator. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, February 18, 2022 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Expand your knowledge of the world of wine as you sip along with sommelier Erik Segelbaum in an exploration of wineries with high levels of social, community, or environmental consciousness. Part of a 3-session winter series, this immersive program includes a curated personal tasting kit to enhance the experience. 

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, February 19, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

Take your iPhone camera skills to another level in a two-day workshop that focuses on the ProCamera app and editing techniques; organizing, printing, and posting your photos; and a critique session on images.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, February 19, 2022 - 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Learn from an orchid-care expert how orchids grow in their native environments and beginner care instructions to keep your orchids blooming.

Studio Arts Workshop
Sunday, February 20, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Using direct printing and water-based printing inks, create realistic looking schools of fish or a single artistic print simply by inking a whole fish and pressing it to paper.

Course
Sunday, February 20, 2022 - 4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. ET

Indulge in a colorful midwinter escape as horticultural experts lead a series of virtual visits that highlight the beauty of notable botanical gardens. This program spotlights Chenshan Botanical Gardens in Shanghai and Huntsville Botanical Garden in Alabama.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, February 22, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

No presidential election in American history carried stakes as high as the contest in November 1864. Historian Christopher Hamner examines the months leading up to the critical contest, held while the Civil War, in its third year, had already left hundreds of thousands of dead Americans strewn across battlefields from Mississippi to Virginia.

Studio Arts Workshop
Wednesday, February 23, 2022 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Making art can be a wonderful way to escape from everyday life. It can be a useful tool in understanding current events. Work with newspapers, magazines, and mixed-media techniques to create a visual representation of the news through collage—and a uniquely personal artwork.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, February 23, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Geologist and cosmochemist Natalie Starkey reveals how exploring these enigmatic celestial objects will help scientists understand a crucial time in our history: The origins of the solar system and everything contained within it.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, February 23, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

On February 8, 1587, Mary, Queen of Scots was executed for treason on the orders of her English cousin, Elizabeth I. It was a tragic end to a turbulent life. But was she the victim of misogyny and anti-Catholic prejudice, or did she bring her troubles on herself by her own miscalculations? Historian Jennifer Paxton explores her life for the answer to one of history’s enduring questions.

Studio Arts Workshop
Wednesday, February 23, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Gain an understanding of aspect ratios (digital sensors and film). The class explores changing the aspect ratio in camera, aspect-ratio constraints in cropping and post-production, and use of the Photoshop image size and canvas size commands.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, February 23, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The Bucintoro at the Molo on Ascension Day, painted in 1760 by Canaletto, the grand master of scenes of the city, portrays the glory of Venice’s early history. Popular Smithsonian Associates speaker Paul Glenshaw places the work in historical context and explores what shaped Caneletto and his era—one that overlapped the time of Vivaldi and Tiepolo. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, February 24, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Learn how to create a photo essay, a set of photographs that tells a story or evokes a series of emotions. Homework assignments are designed to encourage students to explore their own personal interests.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 24, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Some of the most significant American losses and victories of the Revolutionary War took place in South Carolina, where the state’s brand-new Liberty Trail invites travelers to uncover lesser-known sites and fascinating figures related to the period. Emmy Award–nominated PBS television host Darley Newman shares how to get the most out of your exploration of the Liberty Trail, as well as tips about nearby attractions and great local food, drink, lodging, and hotspots along the way.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, February 26, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Biblical scholar and historian Gary Rendsburg presents a fascinating survey of aspects of the Jewish diaspora from the ancient and medieval periods, tracing the histories of communities in Egypt, Babylonia, Russia, Arabia, Italy, and Spain.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, February 26, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Adobe Lightroom is the most useful (and user friendly) software for organizing and editing images, usable for both RAW and JPEG image files. This two-session workshop offers users an overview of the program, with a focus on working with the essential Library and Develop modules for organizing and editing your files.

Course
Sunday, February 27, 2022 - 4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. ET

Indulge in a colorful midwinter escape as horticultural experts lead a series of virtual visits that highlight the beauty of notable botanical gardens. This program spotlights Innisfree in New York and Fairchild Tropical Garden in Florida.

Course
Monday, February 28, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay and her expert guests for an image-rich lunchtime lecture series focusing on fascinating decorative arts and design topics. This session spotlights the White House's official china. Part of a 3-session Decorative Arts winter series.

Studio Arts Workshop
Monday, February 28, 2022 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Learn how to make color choices in your art to bring out a reaction from the viewer. Create combinations with colored pencils that illustrate how color theory works.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, February 28, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Historian Janna Bianchini explores the roots of the Spanish Inquisition: fears of heresy, the drive to crusade, and the political strategems of Spain’s rulers, Ferdinand and Isabella.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, March 1, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

It's easy to think of fairy tales as something distinctly European or antiquated. But folklorists Sara Cleto and Brittany Warman discuss the fairy-tale traditions and stories that can be found around the United States, including the Jack Tales of Appalachia, Black folk and fairy tales from the South, and the rise of the Disney fairy-tale empire.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, March 2, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Toward the end of his prolific career, French impressionist Claude Monet created his enchanting Water Lilies series, inspired by the water-lily ponds he installed at his beloved home, Giverny. Join author Ross King in an exploration of these iconic paintings as he brings to life the extraordinary accomplishment of Monet’s later years. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, March 2, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Learn how to take great photographs of architecture and public art. Class discussions include techniques and camera settings for cityscapes, individual buildings, architectural details, contemporary public art, monuments and memorials, and more.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, March 2, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

This introductory course teaches the basic skills needed for drawing. Working with a variety of materials and techniques, including charcoal and pencils, students explore the rendering of geometric forms, volume, and perspective, with an emphasis on personal gesture marks.

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, March 3, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Show off your photos like a pro and learn how to assemble a personal portfolio that reflects your best work and your distinctive vision as a photographer.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, March 3, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Mark Twain's 1884 masterpiece The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn has been widely regarded as America's greatest novel. But its frequent use of a vile racial epithet has made it toxic as assigned reading material at any level of the American educational system. Hear the arguments surrounding the fate of a work of literature—and what is lost if it disappears. 

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, March 3, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Based on the latest archaeological evidence, Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of history at American University, examines how, why, and when Polynesian navigators ventured out into the forbidding seas to find new lands.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, March 4, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Join art historian Elaine Ruffolo as she explores the influence of the powerful Medici family, from their humble beginnings to their role as great patrons of the arts in Florence. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, March 5, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Create two finished accordion books that can be used as blank canvasses for drawings, mixed media work, collage, or as a model for a more complex, printed-book edition.

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, March 5, 2022 - 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

Find out how to make your clothes last longer by using a host of sustainable fiber practices. They are one part of a new lifestyle that embraces a “regenerative” economy rather than an extraordinary one. Consider taking this class as a step in the right direction for our world and future generations.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, March 7, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

For more than a century, Hollywood has relied on star power as the most reliable way to draw an audience. From the early days of silent movies, the film studios have recognized the crucial role stars played at the box office. Trace the history of movie stardom, how the star system was changed by television, and how actors have redefined what it means to be a star today with Brian Rose.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, March 7, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Contemporary artist Jean-Michel Basquiat is among the most famous American artists we know today. But before his untimely death in 1988, critics were divided about whether or not his work would leave a lasting impression. Explore this artist's legacy with art history professor Jordana Moore Saggese. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, March 8, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Richard III is one of the most famous—and possibly the most infamous—of all British monarchs. In an absorbing program, Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger explores the various attempts to portray Richard III over the centuries, from the villain of Shakespeare to the heroic English king killed on the battlefield.

Course
Wednesday, March 9, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Over the centuries, there are major themes in the history of art that continue to appear and reappear. Art historian Joseph Cassar examines important masterworks and offers a new way to understand and appreciate the similarities among—and the uniqueness of—the artists and the cultural norms that influenced their choices. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, March 9, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Despite prejudice, prosecution, and political setbacks, nothing could force out the Jews of Kazimierz—a district of Krakow in Poland established in the 14th century. For centuries, they built their lives here, gaining religious and other freedoms along the way—until the Holocaust. Author and tour guide Christopher Skutela surveys the district’s rich history, its sites, and its significance.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, March 10, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

In mid-19th-century France, as political, social, and cultural changes swept through Europe, many painters rejected idealized classicism and romanticism, and began painting what they saw around them. The style became known as realism. Art historian Nancy G. Heller examines its evolution, significance, and later influence. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Thursday, March 10, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The three voyages of maritime exploration undertaken by Captain James Cook from 1768 to 1779 are perhaps the most famous of any in history. Filled with high drama, tragedy, intrigue, and humor, their stories have been told and retold for centuries. Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of history at American University, investigates their enduring appeal. This session highlights Cook's first maritime expedition around the world.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, March 12, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

In the midst of writing The Ring of the Nibelung, the most monumental artistic work of the 19th century, Richard Wagner took a breather. His intention was to write works that were smaller in scale and easier to perform. Using excerpts from the finest representations on video, opera and classical music, scholar Saul Lilienstein unearths the treasures this great composer created beyond the Ring.

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, March 12, 2022 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Discover how to easily capture a variety of subjects with loose lines and painterly colors using instructor Cindy Briggs’ quick-sketch watercolors method. This go-with-the-flow technique is perfect for studies, travel journals, and finished fine art.

Course
Monday, March 14, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay and her expert guests for an image-rich lunchtime lecture series focusing on fascinating decorative arts and design topics. This session spotlights Tiffany Glass from the Neustadt Collection. Part of a 3-session Decorative Arts winter series.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, March 14, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

What is it about Jane Austen that has made her one of the most instantly recognizable names in all of literature? Joseph Luzzi, professor of comparative literature at Bard College, explores Austen’s remarkable career and her novels’ astonishing staying power over the centuries.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, March 14, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

In 1775, the British Empire’s most valuable colonies in the New World were in the Caribbean. Historian Richard Bell discusses how fearful imperial officials struggled to insulate the British West Indies from the contagion of revolution that was overtaking its colonies on the mainland—and how those attempts ultimately failed.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, March 16, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Opera and classical music scholar Saul Lilienstein explores sublime examples of the great synthesis of the arts, from the Schubert songs inspired by Goethe’s poetry; to Igor Stravinsky, finding a modern voice within Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex; and more.

Course
Thursday, March 17, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The three voyages of maritime exploration undertaken by Captain James Cook from 1768 to 1779 are perhaps the most famous of any in history. Filled with high drama, tragedy, intrigue, and humor, their stories have been told and retold for centuries. Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of history at American University, investigates their enduring appeal. This session highlights Cook's second voyage to determine if a "Great Southern Continent" really existed.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, March 18, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Join art historian Elaine Ruffolo as she explores the influence of the powerful Medici family, especially their golden age and legacy in Florence. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, March 18, 2022 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Expand your knowledge of the world of wine as you sip along with sommelier Erik Segelbaum in an exploration of some of the world's most interesting wines. Part of a 3-session winter series, this immersive program includes a curated personal tasting kit to enhance the experience.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, March 22, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

The two great academic centers of England—Oxford and Cambridge—are steeped in history reaching back to the 12th and 13th centuries. Scholar and historian Gary Rendsburg brings the verve and culture of these great university towns to life, sharing history flavored with a pleasant dose of Anglophilia.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, March 23, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Walk the virtual red carpet with Washington City Paper film critic Noah Gittell in an evening that focuses on all things Oscar, from Academy Awards history and trivia to discussions of this unusual year's nominations and behind-the-scenes stories.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, March 24, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

No English king’s exploits are as well-known as those of Henry VIII. He is famous for six marriages, for breaking with the Pope and creating the Church of England, and for his ruthless elimination of any obstacles. But Historic Royal Palaces lecturer Siobhan Clarke reveals the king as an enthusiastic patron of the arts whose commissions began the Royal Collection. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Thursday, March 24, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The three voyages of maritime exploration undertaken by Captain James Cook from 1768 to 1779 are perhaps the most famous of any in history. Filled with high drama, tragedy, intrigue, and humor, their stories have been told and retold for centuries. Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of history at American University, investigates their enduring appeal. This session highlights Cook's third and last circumnavigation of the globe.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, March 30, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Up until the 1960s, recurring epidemics were simply a normal fact of daily life, always lurking in the background. Historian Allen Pietrobon highlights some of the lesser-known pandemics and epidemics, revealing how people throughout history dealt with such sudden disease outbreaks.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, March 31, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Though a generally familiar historical event, how much do we really know about what happened on this ill-fated 1789 voyage to Tahiti? Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of history at American University, provides a fresh perspective on the mutiny by placing it in historical context and more.