Skip to main content
Smithsonian Associates - Entertaining, Informative, Eclectic, Insightful

Streaming Programs

Your newest link to our world of learning

Welcome to Smithsonian Associates Streaming, a new digital platform for the high-quality, engaging and varied programs that you’ve come to expect from us.

We invite you to join us from the comfort of your home as we present individual programs, multi-part courses, studio arts classes, and virtual study tours inspired by the Smithsonian’s research, collections and exhibitions. We’re excited to present this new aspect of our 55 years as the world’s largest museum-based educational program—and to have you be an important part of our future growth.

Explore all our offerings in this month's digital program guide.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, June 14, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Washington, D.C., is Indian land. The city is built on the traditional ancestral homelands of the Piscataway and Anacostan peoples. Join Elizabeth Rule, director of the AT&T Center for Indigenous Politics and Policy at George Washington University, to explore the history and legacy of Native Americans in the nation’s capital, as well as a new digital guide and mobile app that maps local sites of Indigenous importance.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, June 15, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Discover the visual splendor and spiritual power of Byzantine art with art historian Judy Scott Feldman, from the jewel-like mosaics of Ravenna to the dazzling domed interior of Hagia Sophia and the penetrating stare of holy figures in Orthodox icons. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Workshop
Tuesday, June 15, 2021 - 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Quickly capture a scene using flowing lines and spontaneous watercolor techniques. Create landscape paintings and vignettes inspired from virtual travel from Europe to California. Complete one or more paintings as you use techniques in composition, drawing, and painting. 

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, June 15, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

In 1951, Peter F. Mack Jr., a 34-year-old U.S. congressman from rural Illinois, made an extraordinary journey for peace. He borrowed a single-engine airplane from the Smithsonian, rechristened it the Friendship Flame, and flew it around the world alone on a self-funded, self-directed goodwill mission.

Course
Wednesday, June 16, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

There are songs so familiar they seem part of us. In this series with writer and filmmaker Sara Lukinson, find out how some of our favorites from the American songbook came to be and how they speak to generations of listeners. This session highlights Summertime and My Favorite Things.

Studio Arts Workshop
Wednesday, June 16, 2021 - 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Create postcard-size paintings while virtually spending an afternoon in Provence. Discover how to capture light and shadow with flowing lines and colors. Use photos in the instructor's "Life in Provence" series, or your own photos as references.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, June 16, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

One of the most sought-after vocal coaches in Hollywood, Denise Woods shares proven, practical, and invaluable tools to change both how we communicate and ultimately how we see ourselves.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, June 16, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

The extensive journals that chronicle the Lewis and Clark expedition’s trek from St. Louis to the Pacific and back offer a vivid look at one of the most remarkable adventures in American history. Clay Jenkinson, a preeminent Lewis and Clark and Jefferson scholar, examines the dynamics of the journals, how they were written, and what they included in their entries—and what they did not—to offer a deeper understanding of the greatest land exploration in North America.

Studio Arts Workshop
Thursday, June 17, 2021 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Learn how to make color choices in your art to bring out a reaction from the viewer. Create combinations with colored pencils that illustrate how color theory works.

Studio Arts Workshop
Thursday, June 17, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Beginning photographers learn how to use histograms, a graphic display of the brightness levels of pixels in an image—and an essential guide to achieving the correct exposure.

Course
Friday, June 18, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Art historian Bonita Billman introduces major artists and movements in American painting from the late 18th century to the present, revealing the connections between historical changes and artistic choices. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Stopping the dissemination of fake news, misinformation, and disinformation campaigns continues to be a Herculean task. An expert discusses how to identify and combat fake news—and how to resist becoming a victim of misinformation.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, June 22, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Are you worried about your memory, or someone else’s? Understand more about how memory works and how you might optimize yours from Barry Gordon, a nationally recognized expert on memory and memory disorders. It is an evening you won’t forget.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, June 23, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

His role as Union Army quartermaster general is well known, but Montgomery Meigs was also an engineer, architect, inventor, and patron of the arts who left an indelible impression on the face of the capital city. Historian Bill Keene offers a virtual tour of sites in the Washington area associated with Meigs in his role of engineer and architect.

Studio Arts Workshop
Wednesday, June 23, 2021 - 1:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. ET

Learn how to paint a sun-filled scene with flowing watercolors. Explore positive and negative space, mixing a range of color values, and capturing sunlight with your paintbrush. A tracing and reference photo is provided to help you begin drawing ahead of class time.

Studio Arts Workshop
Wednesday, June 23, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Students learn how to use their ISO settings to darken and brighten photos, and how this relates to other camera settings such as aperture and shutter speed.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, June 23, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Part of CULINASIA: The Future of Asian Food in America

In both film and popular media as well as farming and land ownership, Asian Americans have been historically underrepresented and repeatedly denied opportunities for advancement  A discussion inspired by the Oscar-nominated film Minari offers a unique opportunity to explore these themes as a panel of Asian American farmers and vintners examine the semi-autobiographical story of a Korean American farm family that embarks on a new kind of American dream.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, June 23, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

At the height of the Cold War, President John F. Kennedy saw outer space exploration as a race for survival—and America was losing to the Soviet Union. Author Jeff Shesol examines why John Glenn’s February 1962 mission into space had greater goals than circling the planet: It was to calm the fears of the free world and renew America’s sense of self-belief.

Studio Arts Workshop
Thursday, June 24, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Light can make or break your photos. Understand the essentials of shooting in a natural-light setting as you learn to gauge the direction of light; recognize degree of diffusion; minimize (or emphasize) lens flare; control conditions with lens hoods, and more.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, June 24, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

Looking for some refreshing cocktail ideas for warm summer evenings? Author and cocktail historian Philip Greene demonstrates how to make classics like the Tom Collins, Mojito, Southside, Daiquiri, and Jack Rose. He also mixes in the drinks’ histories and folklore. 

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, June 24, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Do you wish you knew more about those intriguing-looking birds you spot in your backyard or on your walks?  Matt Felperin, NOVA Parks’ roving naturalist, offers an essential guide on what you see and hear designed for both beginning birders and those who want to take their skills to the next level.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, June 25, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The artist Raphael arrived in Rome in 1508 and brought a subtle revolution in art and architecture to the Eternal City. Join art historian Elaine Ruffolo for a virtual visit to the papal apartments—Stanze—Raphael painted, and revel in his virtuosity. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, June 26, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Historian and scholar Michele L. Simms-Burton, a former professor of African-American studies at Howard University examines the creators and the works that came alive during one of the most creative and intellectually productive eras in African American history, the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. ET

Art historian Aneta Georgevskia-Shine discusses ways of approaching Hieronymus Bosch (1450–1516), a unique artist who continues to fascinate us with the fantastic imagery and densely symbolic messages of his compositions. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, June 29, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The Borgias’ name has become synonymous with blind ambition, murder, rape, incest, and torture in Renaissance Italy. But there was something more to know about them, and art historian Elizabeth Lev provides a broader context to the powerful family’s story.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, June 29, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

From On the Road to Huckleberry Finn, Moby Dick to Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, American writers have produced a wealth of books that chronicle journeys—a genre that extends back to Homer’s Odyssey. Historian and author Clay Jenkinson examines the nature of the literature of the road and how it reflects the restlessness in our national character.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, July 1, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Across America, the pure love and popularity of barbecue cookery has gone through the roof. Adrian Miller—admitted ’cuehead and longtime certified barbecue judge—asks why African Americans aren’t receiving the recognition they deserve in today’s barbecue culture. He reveals how Black barbecuers, pitmasters, and restaurateurs helped develop this cornerstone of American foodways and how they are coming into their own today.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, July 6, 2021 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

In this class open to all levels, students discover the versatility and fluidity of working in watercolors while exploring the functional and aesthetic elements of color and design found in plants.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, July 6, 2021 - 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Build on your botanical painting skills in this next-level class as you create vibrant watercolors inspired by nature. Learn to focus on the texture and detail of botanical subjects including flowers, fruits and vegetables.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, July 6, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Begin by learning basic tapestry weaving techniques and design. Then, create a miniature woven tapestry on a small frame loom. Techniques covered include warping the loom; color mixing and hatching; and how to create horizontal stripes, vertical lines, irregular shapes, shading and contour.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, July 6, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Designed for beginners who want to learn how to use their digital or mirrorless camera as a creative tool, students will gain skill in technical aspects of photography so that they can concentrate on composing beautiful images.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, July 7, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. ET

Impressionism is one of the most popular styles in the history of art. Art historian Janetta Rebold Benton presents intimate looks at four luminaries of the impressionist school.  (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, July 7, 2021 - 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

Explore a liberating style of abstract embroidery using an array of improvisational stitches on found fabric, specifically scraps of vintage kimono silk. Learn some of the principles of abstract art making, developing a language of marks through different stitches, and discuss color palettes, as well as how to edit what doesn't work in your composition.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, July 7, 2021 - 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

Hand stitching is a great way to reduce stress, and the portability of handwork projects makes them ideal take-alongs to fit into your day. Learn the basics of hand-stitched quilt-making by creating an 18-by-24 inch piece as a doll quilt or a wall hanging.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, July 7, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

This intermediate-level photography course offers a better understanding of compositional elements and practices—such as simplicity, balance, and natural lighting—that promote taking better and more unique photographs.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, July 7, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Learn to sketch animals and objects found in nature, then combine your drawings with painting and additional elements and textures to create whimsical or serious mixed media art.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, July 7, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

In the aftermath of the Civil War, a critic suggested that the quest to capture the American experience in one book—“the Great American Novel”—was too great a challenge. But over the years, many authors have made remarkable attempts. Explore seven books that seem to have found a way to tell the American story.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, July 7, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Rock Creek Park, the forested gem running through the heart of Washington, D.C., has delighted residents long before it was declared a national park by an Act of Congress in 1890—and now more than ever offers a welcome destination for outdoor lovers. Join author and naturalist Melanie Choukas-Bradley as she  introduces the story and natural history of a national park landscape as old as Yosemite.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, July 7, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

This introductory course teaches the basic skills needed for drawing. Working with a variety of materials and techniques, including charcoal and pencils, students explore the rendering of geometric forms, volume, and perspective, with an emphasis on personal gesture marks.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, July 8, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. ET

Join Barnes Foundation educator Tom Lo for a lively virtual presentation that explores the current exhibition Soutine and de Kooning: Conversations in Art. Organized by the Barnes and the Musées d’Orsay et de l’Orangerie, it explores the affinities between the work of Chaïm Soutine (1893–1943) and Willem de Kooning (1904–1997).

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, July 8, 2021 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Making art can be a wonderful way to escape from everyday life. It can be a useful tool in understanding current events. Work with newspapers, magazines, and mixed-media techniques to create a visual representation of the news through collage—and a uniquely personal artwork.

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, July 8, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Join floral artist Arrin Sutliff to explore the spectrum of floral design. Sourcing (with a focus on sustainability), making the most of seasonal flowers, creating centerpieces, wiring techniques, bouquet-making, and photographing your work are all among the practical areas covered. 

Studio Arts Workshop
Thursday, July 8, 2021 - 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

Create a portrait of your favorite animal or pet. Students learn to grasp the essence of an animal then discover how to promote the characteristics of their animal on canvas using primarily acrylic paints.

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, July 8, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Take your skills beyond auto mode as you explore a myriad of your digital camera’s exposure options and features in this course designed for intermediate photographers.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, July 8, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Photographer Dan Patterson and American historian Clinton Terry use historically accurate contemporary photos that restage the work of Virginia's first surveyor, George Washington, and his team to provide an interpretive look at the art and science of surveying in the 18th century—and how early America was initially divided and documented.

Tour
Friday, July 9, 2021 - 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Spend a summer morning exploring the verdant wooded trails of Rock Creek Park with naturalist and author  Melanie Choukas-Bradley. She surveys the botanically diverse native trees of Rock Creek Park’s floodplain forest and upland woods and covers the history of D.C.’s woodland gem, the oldest urban national park in the country.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, July 9, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

As the capital of the western outpost of the Roman Empire in its last days, then of the occidental provinces of the Byzantine Empire, Ravenna offered a refuge of luxury and splendor rising above relentless seas of barbarism. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo explores the city’s extraordinary early Christian-era structures and what they reveal about an important period of European cultural history. (World Art History Certificate elective: ½ credit)

Members-Only Program
Friday, July 9, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

In this members-only series led by veteran arts educator Roberta Gasbarre, go behind the scenes and into the working lives of some of the most intriguing people from all across the Smithsonian and Washington’s worlds of culture, science, and education. This program features Richard Olsen, Director, US National Arboretum and Craven Rand, Director, Friends of the National Arboretum.

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, July 10, 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

This class offers an introduction in the basic calligraphic strokes that make up the Foundational Hand, the starting point for learning other hands such as Italic and Black Letter. Students will begin forming these letterforms first by using dual pencils and then the broad-edged pen.

Studio Arts Course
Sunday, July 11, 2021 - 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

The beautiful decorations of religious and secular manuscripts are centuries-old Islamic traditions. Guided by a graduate of the Turquoise Mountain Institute, explore the elements of gold-leaf manuscript illumination in the Afghan tradition.

Studio Arts Course
Sunday, July 11, 2021 - 10:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. ET

Beginning students as well as experienced painters explore watercolor techniques and learn new approaches to painting through demonstration, discussion, and experimentation.

Studio Arts Workshop
Sunday, July 11, 2021 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Henna tattoos reflect an ancient and beautiful practice of body art. Explore the form’s history as you learn to apply simple traditional Indian henna designs.

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, July 11, 2021 - 5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. ET

Join volcanologist Kirt Kempter on an exploration of the geology of Yellowstone, including the rocks and hydrothermal features that make this national park unique in the world.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, July 12, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Astrophysicist Hakeem Oluseyi dives into the mysteries of the universe and how the universe we perceive is not the universe that actually exists.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, July 12, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

This introductory course teaches the basic skills needed for drawing. Working with a variety of materials and techniques, including charcoal and pencils, students explore the rendering of geometric forms, volume, and perspective, with an emphasis on personal gesture marks.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, July 12, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Collage is an amazingly versatile art form with no limit when it comes to techniques and materials. In this beginner-level course, learn about tools, adhesives, materials, and  appropriate bases for supporting a collage.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, July 12, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Historian Marcia Chatelain explores how the social upheaval of the Great Migration, the mass movement of mostly rural Black Southerners to urban cores across the country between 1916 and 1970, continues to resonate in our lives today.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, July 13, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Spend a summer morning discovering the joy and power of reflective writing inspired by visual art, guided by the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s Writing Salon, Mary Hall Surface.

Studio Arts Workshop
Tuesday, July 13, 2021 - 1:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Creating illustrations for a children’s manuscript is loads of fun once you get to know the basics. Join author and illustrator Lori VanKirk Schue as she leads you through the foundations of interpreting a story through pictures.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, July 13, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The Boston Tea Party was a response to the 1773 Tea Act, the latest of a series of parliamentary directives stretching back to the 1765 Stamp Act. Never intended to be so provocative, it triggered a reaction that marks the first major protest in America against corporate greed and the effects of globalization that set the stage for the American Revolution.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, July 13, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Neal Asbury and Jean-Pierre Isbouts trace the critical role that maps played in battles including those of the French and Indian War, and examine how British strategy during the Revolutionary War became entirely dependent on hastily engraved (and often flawed) charts of geographical features and enemy dispositions.

Tour
Wednesday, July 14, 2021 - 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Spend a summer morning exploring the verdant wooded trails of Rock Creek Park with naturalist and author  Melanie Choukas-Bradley. She surveys the botanically diverse native trees of Rock Creek Park’s floodplain forest and upland woods and covers the history of D.C.’s woodland gem, the oldest urban national park in the country.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, July 14, 2021 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Whether you want to work in digital or film, this course offers a solid foundation for new photographers ready to learn the basics.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, July 14, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

In a conversation with Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jon Meacham, Daniel Silva discusses his career as a best-selling author of 24 novels; the inspiration behind his thrilling storylines; and his writing process.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, July 14, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

In an engaging dive into language, author Ralph Keyes explores the etymological underworld of terms and expressions and uncovers plenty of hidden gems.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, July 15, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

In The 3rd of May by Francisco Goya, the brutal scene of a mass execution still manages to shock, even more than 200 years after its creation. But what does it actually depict? What were the events that so outraged Goya to create this iconic work? 

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, July 15, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

Join American music specialist and Gershwin scholar Robert Wyatt as he reviews the lives of the Gershwin brothers, from their simple roots, through their Tin Pan Alley apprenticeship, to the glory years that were too short.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, July 15, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Take a fascinating look at the vivid history of undercover reporters who exposed corruption and abuse in America—and in the process redefined what it means to be a woman and a journalist. (Part of the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative, Because of Her Story)

Tour
Friday, July 16, 2021 - 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Spend a summer morning exploring the verdant wooded trails of Rock Creek Park with naturalist and author  Melanie Choukas-Bradley. She surveys the botanically diverse native trees of Rock Creek Park’s floodplain forest and upland woods and covers the history of D.C.’s woodland gem, the oldest urban national park in the country.

Studio Arts Course
Friday, July 16, 2021 - 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Explore the materials, tools, and techniques used in collage and assemblage as you create an artwork that’s uniquely yours. The workshop, ideal for both nonartists and those with experience, is a great way to spark your creativity in two forms that offer wide possibilities for inventive expression.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, July 16, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Spend a fascinating Friday evening expanding your knowledge of the world of wine as you sip along with sommelier Erik Segelbaum in a series of delectable adventures. This immersive program focuses on wine favorites from the pros and includes a curated personal tasting kit to enhance the experience.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, July 17, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Historian and self-styled Anglophile Gary A. Rendsburg draws on his  research in English museums and libraries to find out why, through the centuries, many venerable English personages were fascinated by Jewish history.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, July 17, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Adobe Lightroom is the most useful (and user friendly) software for organizing and editing images, usable for both RAW and JPEG image files. This two-session workshop offers users an overview of the program, with a focus on working with the essential Library and Develop modules for organizing and editing your files.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, July 17, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

White-line woodcuts are multicolor images printed from a single block of wood. Learn to create your own by cutting a nature print or simple line drawing into a single wood block with a knife or gouge, creating the “white lines” when printed.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, July 17, 2021 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Whether you know how to knit a scarf but not much more, used to knit but now feel rusty, or are confident in your beginning knitting skills but want to make sure you’re ready for an intermediate class or project, this workshop is for you.

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, July 17, 2021 - 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Combine painting techniques with collage to produce pieces with texture and depth. Students work on watercolor paper and canvas as they learn how to use papers, acrylics, inks, and other materials.

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, July 18, 2021 - 5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. ET

With more people spending time at home over the past year, interest in backyard birding has seen a significant spike. Adding a bird feeder to your yard is a great way to closely observe wild birds, as well as offset the loss of avian habitats in urban areas.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, July 19, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

In an artist-led series designed to provide a tranquil mid-day break, create small but satisfying works of art as a way to hit “pause” and incorporate a bit of creativity into your at-home routines.

Course
Monday, July 19, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Curator Elizabeth Lay is joined by Maryhill Museum of Art’s Curator, Steven Grafe to share the story, the designs, and the backdrops that represent a collection of 172 outfits by 52 Parisian couturiers, a reminder to the world that Paris still ruled fashion in 1945 after the war. Part of a 3-session Decorative Arts summer series.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, July 19, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

The most sculptural of all printmaking techniques, woodblock printing and linocut printing are ideal for creating bold images composed of patterns and textures.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, July 19, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Many film directors disguise their bold artistic intentions, often burying something quite profound beneath a story’s glossy surface. Join Yale University film professor Marc Lapadula for a dive into some remarkable examples of cinematic mastery that reflect technical innovation and complex thematic construction.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, July 20, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Combine mosaic and assemblage while exploring where traditional and non-traditional materials meet. Students will learn design and composition theories while working with the portrait as a subject.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, July 20, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

In 1940 Adolph Hitler had two choices when it came to the Mediterranean region: Stay out or commit sufficient forces to expel the British from the Middle East. Against his generals’ advice, the Fuhrer committed a major strategic blunder.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, July 20, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Join Allen Pietrobon, an assistant professor of global affairs at Trinity Washington University and an award-winning historian, as he examines the role that alcohol played in American life leading up to Prohibition. And how, in its defiance, did American society and culture change so dramatically throughout the 1920s?

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, July 21, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Early in the 20th century, Wright undertook a quest to design housing more accessible for the typical middle-class family. Historian Bill Keene examines this lesser-known aspect of the architect’s career in a program extensively illustrated with images of Wright’s houses and their plans.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, July 21, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Winifred Gallagher draws on her book New Women in the Old West: From Settlers to Suffragists, An Untold American Story, to bring to life the little-known women who played monumental roles in one of the most vibrant and transformative periods in the history of the United States.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, July 21, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The Harry Potter novels may seem like a strange perspective from which to view economics. In a realm filled with magic, we might expect the economic problems that we muggles face to disappear in a puff of smoke. But, as economist Brian O’Roark explains, even the Boy Who Lived has to come to grips with fiscal reality.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, July 22, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

The enormously popular Netflix series “Bridgerton” has brought Britain’s Queen Charlotte into the limelight, but how accurate are the show’s portrayals of this long-reigning queen consort? Tudor scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger explores the nonfictional Charlotte’s influence on social life, the arts, and politics during her 57 years on the throne, as well as her  lengthy and complicated relationship with her husband King George III.  

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, July 22, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Although New York City’s first Gay Pride parade in June 1971 was a key marker in the progress of LGBT+ organizing, a lesser-known pivotal moment took place in Washington, D.C., 20 years later. Nikki Lane of American University examines how the city’s home-grown Black Pride event grew into a national and international model for celebrations of community, inclusion, and diversity.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, July 23, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

At its height, Renaissance Florence was a center of enormous wealth, power, and influence. Its often-violent political scene was dominated by rich mercantile families, the most famous being the Medici. Renaissance art historian Elaine Ruffolo traces the family’s influence on the city’s political, economic, and cultural history. (World Art History Certificate elective, ½ credit)

Studio Arts Workshop
Friday, July 23, 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

For generations, Palestinian women have gathered with their daughters to work collectively on embroidery projects, bonding with one another over a cup of tea. Guided by Wafa Ghnaim, who began her training in embroidery with her mother at age 2, learn the basic Palestinian cross-stitch and how to create a tatreez sampler, using Aida cloth fabric. Motif Focus: Road of Stars, Yaffa Region.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, July 24, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Saul Lilienstein takes a joyful and serious look at the Beatles’ music, its roots and influences, and its relationship to the period of social change that provided a backdrop to their years at the top of the charts.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, July 24, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Metaphysics is the branch of philosophy that concerns itself with what is fundamental or basic to reality. Prepare for a whirlwind tour of historical and contemporary controversies in search of the nature of the ultimate reality led by philosophy scholar Michael Gorman.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, July 26, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

On February 23, 1961, Jacqueline Kennedy launched the most historic and celebrated redecoration of the White House in its history. James Archer Abbott and Elaine Rice Bachmann—co-authors of a new book that chronicles the undertaking—discuss the 60-year legacy of one of the most influential interior design projects in American history.

Course
Monday, July 26, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Join Author Michael Gorra  in an exploration of three works by William Faulkner, one of the greatest—and most problematic—figures in American literature. 

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, July 26, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Explore the tangible connections between baseball and Latino culinary traditions and how Latinos have created culinary fusions and experiences that reflect broader themes and trends in American history—the themes explored in the National Museum of American History’s new exhibition ¡Pleibol! In the Barrios and the Big Leagues / En los barrios y las grandes ligas.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, July 27, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Award-winning journalist Alvin Hall and social justice trainer Janée Woods Weber share personal and powerful stories they collected during their 12-day, 2,021-mile road trip from Detroit to New Orleans inspired by The Negro Motorist Green Book, the historic guide African Americans relied on to travel safely at the height of segregation and the Jim Crow era.

Course
Tuesday, July 27, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Paul Glenshaw reprises four of his most popular programs from his daytime series Art + History, in which he examines great works of art in their historical context. As he explores seminal works by John Singleton Copley, Augustus Saint Gaudens, Edouard Manet, and Auguste Renoir he brings the world of the art and its creator to vivid life. (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1/2 credit.) This session focuses on Watson and the Shark by John Singleton Copley.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, July 28, 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

There’s no reason to fear a blank canvas. If you’ve ever wanted to paint, here’s a class that offers the perfect introduction to the art—and will have you ready to pick up your brush with confidence.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, July 28, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

In his new book Rescuing the Planet, Tony Hiss sets out on a journey to take stock of the "superorganism" that is the Earth: its land, its elements, its plants and animals, its greatest threats—and what we can do to keep it, and ourselves, alive.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, July 28, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The pandemic has upended the travel industry and changed the way we explore the world. What will smart travelers need to know once we can pack our bags again? Andrea Sachs, the Washington Post’s travel writer; Pauline Frommer, editorial director of Frommer’s Guidebooks; and Karin King, deputy assistant secretary of state for overseas citizen services share the best advice and resources for staying safe, healthy, and well-informed so you can relax on your long-overdue trip.  

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, July 29, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Few figures in history excite as passionately held and often-conflicting visions as Napoleon. Historian Alexander Mikaberidze discusses the many facets of Napoleon the man and his enormous influence on Europe and many parts of the world.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, July 29, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Arts journalist Richard Selden, a Baltimore resident since 2008, leads the first of several virtual visits to the city’s most historic and distinctive neighborhoods.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, July 31, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

In the late 19th century, Paris was the only place to be for any self-respecting aspiring American artist. Art historian Bonita Billman highlights the city’s ascension as the center of the art world and how it transformed the young painters who in turn transformed American art. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Sunday, August 1, 2021 - 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. ET

Explore the wide range of colors that nature can yield. In this workshop, learn how to establish a dye studio at home, dive into various dyestuffs and colors, and walk through the process of dyeing fiber with natural materials.

Course
Monday, August 2, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Curator Elizabeth Lay is joined by art historian and collector Samantha Viksnins, who delves deeper into the history of the Hermès Carré, the production process of the limited-edition scarves, and illustrates what sets the Hermès designs apart from those of other luxury scarves. Part of a 3-session Decorative Arts summer series.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, August 2, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Designed for those who have already taken a structured introduction to Lightroom class and are familiar with the Library and Develop modules, this class will help you leverage all of the Library functions.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, August 3, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Media and communications expert Brian Rose surveys the extraordinary landscape of American TV comedy, examining how it has evolved since the 1950s. 

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, August 3, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

The Valois dynasty, which rose to power in France in 1328, is largely overshadowed by their English rivals, the Tudors. Yet, the two centuries of the Valois reign were crucial in the establishment of France as a major European power. Historian Alexander Mikaberidze explores the dynasty’s rise—and fall.

Studio Arts Course
Tuesday, August 3, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Understanding how to fully utilize your camera’s flash is key for photographers wishing to take their photographic skill to the next level. This class, designed for digital photographers familiar with aperture, shutter speed, ISO and metering in manual mode, offers to do just that.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, August 3, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Historian Sam Lebovic  traces the evolution of the Espionage Act to provide a new history of state secrecy today—and how it reveals American democracy’s struggles to balance security and liberty.

Studio Arts Workshop
Wednesday, August 4, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Discover how to quickly capture a variety of subjects with loose lines and painterly colors using instructor Cindy Briggs’ quick sketch watercolors method. This “go with the flow” technique is perfect for studies, travel journals, and finished fine art.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, August 4, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

When a freak accident on board the International Space Station results in an order to return to Earth, astronaut Walli Beckwith refuses to leave her post. Earth is in trouble and she feels she must do something. Join Jeffrey Kluger, author of Apollo 13, in a discussion of his new novel, Holdout, and his career as a science writer with former NASA astronaut Marsha Ivans.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, August 5, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Artists, activists, and radio DJs transformed music into a political weapon and unifying force in the Civil Rights Movement, delivering powerful messages of hope to the Black community and beyond. Historian Leon Burnette explores how the music that grew out of a seminal era became an indelible part of America’s social and cultural heritage.

Studio Arts Workshop
Thursday, August 5, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

If you venture outside the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, you discover a walkway filled with marble statues of Renaissance masters including Michelangelo, da Vinci, and Ravello. Bring a bit of Italy to your artwork as you learn to capture the likeness of a sunlit sculpture in watercolors.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, August 5, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Lena Richard, a Black chef and entrepreneur in New Orleans, built a dynamic culinary career in the segregated South, defying harmful stereotypes of Black women that severely diminished their role in the creation and development of American food culture and its economy.

This program is hosted in collaboration with the Southern Food and Beverage Museum where Lavigne is the Director of Culinary Programming.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, August 6, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The golden period of the Serenissima Republic is reflected in the glorious art generated for its churches, confraternities, and palaces, including works by Bellini, Tintoretto, Tiepolo, and other masters. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo traces the history of this fabled city and the art and architecture created there. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, August 7, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Their scandals became the stuff of legends, but this royal family also opened the New World and new worlds of English power. Scholar Carol Ann Lloyd Stanger of the Folger Shakespeare Library leads a look behind the Tudors’ carefully contrived image of monarchy.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, August 7, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Get the most out of your digital mirrorless or SLR camera by taking part in this workshop, which provides a solid introduction to these cameras’ features and potential.

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, August 7, 2021 - 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Center yourself through the calm flow of the rhythmic motion of hand stitching. Create a therapeutic textile panel using a hand needle and materials you have at home, which can include vintage family textiles such as table napkins to add a connection to warm personal memories.

Course
Monday, August 9, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

From colossal Olmec heads to the paintings of Frida Kahlo, Aztec temples to Mexican murals, this survey of Latin American art sweeps through the centuries. Join art historian Michele Greet, who traces the significant creators and trends that defined and shaped the arts of Latin America from their earliest expressions through the 19th and 20th centuries. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Course
Tuesday, August 10, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Paul Glenshaw reprises four of his most popular programs from his daytime series Art + History, in which he examines great works of art in their historical context. As he explores seminal works by John Singleton Copley, Augustus Saint Gaudens, Edouard Manet, and Auguste Renoir he brings the world of the art and its creator to vivid life. (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1/2 credit.) This session focuses on The Shaw Memorial by Augustus Saint Gaudens.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, August 11, 2021 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Learn the basics of bobbin lacemaking, from winding the bobbins to making four small lace projects, in this introductory class. Colored threads are used to make it easier to see what is happening.

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, August 11, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Learn how to take great photographs of architecture and public art. Class discussions include techniques and camera settings for cityscapes, individual buildings, architectural details, contemporary public art, monuments and memorials, and more. 

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, August 11, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Over more than a century, three generations of Wyeths have created a collective portrait of America. Art historian Bonita Billman traces the family tradition reflected in their disparate subjects and styles. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, August 11, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

This introductory course teaches the basic skills needed for drawing. Working with a variety of materials and techniques, including charcoal and pencils, students explore the rendering of geometric forms, volume, and perspective, with an emphasis on personal gesture marks.

Studio Arts Course
Thursday, August 12, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Go beyond taking random photographs and develop a cohesive body of work that is uniquely yours. Review some contemporary photographers’ work and define the characteristics that are incorporated into their portfolios.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, August 12, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger explores how London served as a backdrop and inspiration for William Shakespeare. She reveals how he was inspired by the humanity he observed in the city to create the unforgettable worlds of his plays.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, August 14, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The famous breaking of the Mayan code in the late 20th century revolutionized the study of these peoples and of ancient America. Humanities scholar George Scheper examines how interdisciplinary study of the Maya extends beyond the traditional archaeological focus to comprise political and social history, art, comparative religion, and ecology.

Course
Monday, August 16, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Curator Elizabeth Lay is joined by the daughter of the owner of Mae's Millinary shop known for its stunning "showstopper" hats, Donna Limerick, who discusses her mother’s entrepreneurial spirit, her memories of working in the shop, and shares cherished family photographs of “showstopper” hat images to view and enjoy.  She also talks about her experience working with the curators at NMAAHC to create the exhibition dedicated to her mother and her shop. Part of a 3-session Decorative Arts summer series.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, August 16, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

During the harsh winter of 1777 when the Continental Army was camped at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, Gen. George Washington initiated a new set of drills and regimental regulations that helped to turn a rag-tag collection of enlistees into a professional fighting force. Historian Richard Bell tells the Valley Forge story through the perspective of Baron Friedrich von Steuben, an immigrant who trained the troops as he dealt with anti-German sentiments and rumors about his sexuality.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, August 17, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. ET

“How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.” With these words, Elizabeth Barrett Browning has come down to us as a romantic heroine, a recluse controlled by a domineering father and often overshadowed by her husband, Robert Browning. But she defied cultural constraints—a modern figure whose life is a study in self-invention. Writer and poet Fiona Sampson presents a nuanced, comprehensive portrait of Britain’s most famous female poet.

Studio Arts Workshop
Friday, August 20, 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

For generations, Palestinian women have gathered with their daughters to work collectively on embroidery projects, bonding with one another over a cup of tea. Guided by Wafa Ghnaim, who began her training in embroidery with her mother at age 2, learn the basic Palestinian cross-stitch and how to create a tatreez sampler, using Aida cloth fabric. Motif Focus: Flowers, Ramallah Region

Course
Tuesday, August 24, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Paul Glenshaw reprises four of his most popular programs from his daytime series Art + History, in which he examines great works of art in their historical context. As he explores seminal works by John Singleton Copley, Augustus Saint Gaudens, Edouard Manet, and Auguste Renoir he brings the world of the art and its creator to vivid life. (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1/2 credit.) This session focuses on The Railway by Edouard Manet.

Studio Arts Workshop
Tuesday, August 24, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Like the myriad of small pieces of colored stone, tile, and glass that make up a mosaic, the Washington, DC area contains a surprising number of works that together provide a picture of the styles and techniques that mark an art form that’s been practiced since ancient times. Join mosaic artist Bonnie Fitzgerald for a virtual tour of a wide variety of local mosaic treasures at notable public sites, contemporary spaces, and federal and private buildings.

Studio Arts Workshop
Friday, August 27, 2021 - 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

Nothing can be more frustrating than realizing there’s something wrong with your knitting, and not knowing how to fix it. This workshop focuses on avoiding errors, learning to detect them sooner, and what to do once you know there’s a problem.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, August 27, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in the Early Renaissance, examines the style, iconography, and history of The Last Judgment and the influence that it had on later artists. 

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, August 28, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Use colorful Akua water-based printmaking ink to create evocative spring-themed prints on fabric.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, August 28, 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

In their native environments, most common orchids grow above the soil attached to trees or rocks. Discover the unique attributes of orchids that allow them to grow this way. 

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, August 29, 2021 - 5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. ET

Join volcanologist Kirt Kempter as he focuses on the geologic origins of Copper Canyon and the Sierra Madre Occidental.

Course
Tuesday, August 31, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Paul Glenshaw reprises four of his most popular programs from his daytime series Art + History, in which he examines great works of art in their historical context. As he explores seminal works by John Singleton Copley, Augustus Saint Gaudens, Edouard Manet, and Auguste Renoir he brings the world of the art and its creator to vivid life. (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1/2 credit.) This session focuses on The Burghers of Calais by Auguste Rodin.

Studio Arts Workshop
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Learn how to create a photo essay, a set of photographs that tell a story or evoke a series of emotions. Homework assignments are designed to encourage students to explore their own personal interests.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

How did American transform from a country that relied on a relatively wholesome and nourishing food system to one in which the daily diet is laden with fats, sugar, and ultra-processed unhealthy foods? Historian Allen Pietrobon traces the changes in American cuisine since the end of WWII, highlighting key events that radically changed how and what Americans eat.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, September 2, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

For more than seven decades, Carl Reiner and Mel Brooks made America laugh—either through their remarkable solo careers or their legendary partnership. Discover the extraordinary comic talents of these giants of American comedy who conquered every medium they took on: television, films, Broadway, recordings.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, September 8, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

The House of Bourbon remains one of the most historically important European royal houses. The Bourbons came to prominence in the 16th century when they first became the rulers of Navarre, in Spain, and later of France proper. Historian Alexander Mikaberidze explores their rise to power—and the root causes of their fall.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, September 9, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Historian Richard Bell examines Paine’s meteoric rise to celebrity status during the American Revolution and his equally dramatic fall from grace. Once lionized as our most relatable and revolutionary founding father, according to Bell, Paine died a pariah, too radical for the cautious new country he had helped call into being.

Studio Arts Course
Friday, September 10, 2021 - 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

It takes a village! In this workshop, students construct their own tiny houses, which they personalize working in paper-mache, acrylics, and mixed media.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, September 11, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Delightful and detailed prints on paper can be made using real fish. Using direct printing and water-based printing inks, create realistic looking schools of fish or a single artistic print simply by inking a whole fish and pressing it to paper.

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, September 11, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

The Civil War was the largest slave revolt in world history—and a war for freedom that hurled American history off its rails. It would end with the destruction of American slavery and the passage of the 13th Amendment. Historian Richard Bell explores the antislavery fight, focusing on the people whose courage and personal struggle led to the final victory.

Studio Arts Workshop
Saturday, September 11, 2021 - 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

Inspired by the 6-Word Memoir project, learn to capture quick images of personal stories in quilted wall-hangings. Fusing allows students to appliqué shapes quickly, while embroidered details emphasize essential ideas.

Studio Arts Course
Monday, September 13, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Learn the rules of bookmaking…then get creative and break them!  Each week, make different kinds of books, including an accordion book, Japanese stab bound journal, and a travel journal with sewn in pages. 

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, September 13, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Join Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger on a journey to Regency England as seen through the eyes of Jane Austen and her novels.  She provides fans of Austen added insight into the characters and their lives, and aficionados of history with the details and dramas that made this one of the most fascinating eras in English history.

Studio Arts Workshop
Friday, September 17, 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

For generations, Palestinian women have gathered with their daughters to work collectively on embroidery projects, bonding with one another over a cup of tea. Guided by Wafa Ghnaim, who began her training in embroidery with her mother at age 2, learn the basic Palestinian cross-stitch and how to create a tatreez sampler, using Aida cloth fabric. Motif Focus: Carnations, Bersheba Region

Course
Monday, September 20, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Art historian Nancy G. Heller focuses on a quartet of Spain’s most significant painters—unearthing their sources, analyzing their principal works, discussing the critical receptions of their pictures, and demonstrating their influences on later generations of visual artists, both within and beyond the borders of Spain. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Course
Thursday, September 23, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Join Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of history at American University, for in-depth looks at four UNESCO World Heritage sites that have been profoundly affected by nearby volcanoes, from Pompeii to Virunga National Park. Each lavishly illustrated program goes far beyond the typical tourist experience, incorporating insights drawn from current scholarship and research. This session focuses on Herculaneum and Pompeii.

Course
Thursday, September 30, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Join Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of history at American University, for in-depth looks at four UNESCO World Heritage sites that have been profoundly affected by nearby volcanoes, from Pompeii to Virunga National Park. Each lavishly illustrated program goes far beyond the typical tourist experience, incorporating insights drawn from current scholarship and research. This session focuses on Thingvellir.

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, September 30, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

In Stir-Frying to the Sky’s Edge, culinary historian and award-winning cookbook author Grace Young writes of how for centuries the Chinese carried their woks and stir-frying techniques around the globe. In America, beginning around the late-19th century, Chinese immigrants struggled to establish themselves in cities and small towns—from San Francisco to the Mississippi Delta—while contending as well with poverty, discrimination, and to this day, anti-Asian bias.

Course
Thursday, October 7, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Join Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of history at American University, for in-depth looks at four UNESCO World Heritage sites that have been profoundly affected by nearby volcanoes, from Pompeii to Virunga National Park. Each lavishly illustrated program goes far beyond the typical tourist experience, incorporating insights drawn from current scholarship and research. This session focuses on Mount Fuji.

Course
Thursday, October 14, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Join Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of history at American University, for in-depth looks at four UNESCO World Heritage sites that have been profoundly affected by nearby volcanoes, from Pompeii to Virunga National Park. Each lavishly illustrated program goes far beyond the typical tourist experience, incorporating insights drawn from current scholarship and research. This session focuses on Virunga National Park.