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Smithsonian Associates - Entertaining, Informative, Eclectic, Insightful

Streaming Programs

Your newest link to our world of learning

Welcome to Smithsonian Associates Streaming, a new digital platform for the high-quality, engaging and varied programs that you’ve come to expect from us.

We invite you to join us from the comfort of your home as we present individual programs, multi-part courses, studio arts classes, and virtual study tours inspired by the Smithsonian’s research, collections and exhibitions. We’re excited to present this new aspect of our 55 years as the world’s largest museum-based educational program—and to have you be an important part of our future growth.

Explore all our offerings in this month's digital program guide.

Lecture/Seminar

French Fairytales

Monday, August 15, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Once upon a time, fairy tales were not the short, simple children’s stories we all know. Instead, they often carried subtle messages or warnings, or ridiculed powerful figures. These subversive stories were created in 17th-century Paris literary salons, safe forums for aristocrats—mostly women—to gather and share often coded tales. Folklorists Sara Cleto and Brittany Warman explore these mostly forgotten tales and their deeper meanings.

Lecture/Seminar

Art + History: Evening Encores

Tuesday, August 16, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

If you’ve not experienced Paul Glenshaw’s dynamic series Art + History, in which he examines great works of art in their historical context, now’s your chance. In this summer series, he reprises six of his earlier daytime sessions in livestreamed evening programs. In this session, Glenshaw discusses The Gross Clinic by Thomas Eakins. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course

Architecture and Public Art Photography

Wednesday, August 17, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Learn how to take great photographs of architecture and public art. Class discussions include techniques and camera settings for cityscapes, individual buildings, architectural details, contemporary public art, monuments and memorials, and more.

Lecture/Seminar

Breakout! Allied Operations After D-Day

Wednesday, August 17, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The June 6, 1944, landings in occupied France by British, Canadian, and American soldiers constituted only the first phase of Operation Overlord. The early successes were followed by weeks of Allied frustration and horrific casualties in the face of German forces. Kevin Weddle, a professor of military theory and strategy, examines why the story of the ultimate Allied breakout is one of innovation, imagination, determined leadership, and German mistakes—and was as important and instrumental in the final Allied victory over Nazi Germany as any other D-Day battle.

Studio Arts Course

Portrait Drawing

Wednesday, August 17, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

In this class, students will be introduced to the basic steps of how to create a convincing portrait using charcoal or graphite. All levels of experience welcomed.

Studio Arts Course

The Photo Essay

Thursday, August 18, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Learn how to create a photo essay, a set of photographs that tells a story or evokes a series of emotions. Homework assignments are designed to encourage students to explore their own personal interests.

Lecture/Seminar

Seeking the Lost Colony of Roanoke

Thursday, August 18, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

This first attempt by the English to settle the New World ended in the disappearance of 115 people in 1587 on what is now the North Carolina coast. It still remains an unsolved mystery. Andrew Lawler, a longtime science journalist, examines both old archival material and new archaeological data to provide up-to-date insights on the Roanoke settlers.

Lecture/Seminar

Destination Cities: St. Louis

Thursday, August 18, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

From charming parks to neighborhoods that reflect a rich immigrant heritage to terrific beer and BBQ, St Louis, Missouri, has much to offer visitors. PBS television host Darley Newman leads a lively virtual tour of the city, uncovering the lesser-known backstories of its iconic landmarks and locally loved hidden gems—and plenty of reasons why St. Louis is an ideal destination.

Lecture/Seminar

Secrets of the Sommelier

Friday, August 19, 2022 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

The path to becoming a wine expert is long, arduous, and intensive. Award-winning sommelier Erik Segelbaum offers a chance to accelerate your learning by sharing the tips, tricks, and secrets to tasting and selecting wines like a world-class pro. Part of a 3-session summer series, this immersive program includes a curated personal tasting kit to enhance the experience.

Studio Arts Course

Back-to-Basics Boot Camp for Knitters

Saturday, August 20, 2022 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Whether you know how to knit a scarf but not much more, used to knit but now feel rusty, or are confident in your beginning knitting skills but want to make sure you're ready for an intermediate class or project, this workshop is for you.

Lecture/Seminar

The Age of Confucius

Monday, August 22, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Historian Justin M. Jacobs analyzes the exciting intellectual ferment of the age of Confucius and the thinkers who followed in his footsteps during the Warring States era: Mozi, Mencius, Zhuangzi, Xunzi, and Han Feizi. The lively exchange of ideas among these philosophers helped define Chinese civilization itself and set the stage for the next two thousand years of dynasties and empires.

Lecture/Seminar

Elbert Hubbard and the Roycrofters: America’s Arts and Crafts Movement

Monday, August 22, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

In the late 19th century, Elbert Hubbard, a salesman for Buffalo’s Larkin Soap Company, fused the ideals of the British Arts and Crafts movement with his strong business sense to create the artistic and philosophical community called Roycroft in East Aurora, New York. Alan Nowicki, program director at the Roycroft campus, traces its influential flourishing, its demise, and its restoration that captures its former glory.

Lecture/Seminar

Bridges of Light and Time: A Reflective Writing Workshop

Tuesday, August 23, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover the power of reflective writing inspired by art guided by the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s Writing Salon, Mary Hall Surface. Join her and step into the colors, light, and forms of Claude Monet’s exquisite The Japanese Footbridge to explore the bridge as a metaphor for the thresholds and journeys of our lives.

Lecture/Seminar

Jazz: Modern Soundscapes in Film

Tuesday, August 23, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Some of the world’s greatest movie scores were composed by some of the world’s greatest jazz musicians. With film clips, commentary, and live piano demonstrations, concert musician and movie fanatic Rachel Franklin delves into the hidden magic of some of the finest jazz-inspired music from films including A Streetcar Named Desire, The Sweet Smell of Success, Alfie, and Birdman.

Studio Arts Course

Botanical Illustration: Watercolor Flowers

Tuesday, August 23, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Learn watercolor techniques specific to botanical illustration, including dry brushing and creating small details, while working from sketches or photos of real flowers.

Studio Arts Course

Abstract Watercolor for Beginners

Wednesday, August 24, 2022 - 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. ET

Learn to embrace and celebrate the unpredictability, versatility, and beauty of watercolor. Class discussions cover supplies; color theory, palettes and pigment control; and various exercises and experiments to achieve different effects.

Lecture/Seminar

The ENIAC Programmers: The Women Behind the First Modern Computer

Wednesday, August 24, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

After the end of World War II, six pioneering women were assigned to program the new Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer—for which there were no instructional codes or programming languages to guide them. They succeeded, but their story was never told to the public. Author and documentary filmmaker Kathy Kleiman brings it—and these technological revolutionaries—out of the shadows.

Lecture/Seminar

DC’s Black Broadway: Remembering U Street’s Brightest Lights

Wednesday, August 24, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Long before today’s restaurants, boutiques, and luxury high-rises, Washington’s U Street was known as the city’s vibrant Black Broadway. Author Briana A. Thomas brings to life the historic U Street neighborhood’s heritage of arts, entertainment, and commerce from the early triumphs of emancipation to the recent struggles of gentrification.

Studio Arts Course

Build Your Photographic Portfolio

Thursday, August 25, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Show off your photos like a pro and learn how to assemble a personal portfolio that reflects your best work and your distinctive vision as a photographer.

Lecture/Seminar

Indigenous Civilizations of the Southwest: Transitions and Innovations

Thursday, August 25, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Recent discoveries suggest that Indigenous peoples have lived in the area we know as the American Southwest for more than 22,000 years. Jon Ghahate of the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque examines how these early inhabitants utilized science-based constructs as they shifted from nomadic hunter-gatherer family groups to more socially complex agrarian communities of thousands of inhabitants.

Lecture/Seminar

The Volcanic Pulse of Italy

Monday, August 29, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Italy has long been a focal point for the field of volcanology, thanks to many notable sites such as Vesuvius, Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano. Join volcanologist Kirt Kempter for an exploration of the country’s volcanic past, present, and future.

Lecture/Seminar

Art + History: Evening Encores

Tuesday, August 30, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

If you’ve not experienced Paul Glenshaw’s dynamic series Art + History, in which he examines great works of art in their historical context, now’s your chance. In this summer series, he reprises six of his earlier daytime sessions in livestreamed evening programs. In this session, Glenshaw discusses Gassed by John Singer Sargent. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar

How To Be a Conscious Eater

Wednesday, August 31, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Bewildered by navigating a food world full of fads, conflicting news, and marketing hype? You can still make smart, thoughtful choices amid the chaos. Sophie Egan, an expert on food’s impact on human and environmental health, offers a practical guide to everyday eating that’s good for you, good for others, and good for the planet.

Lecture/Seminar

Brunelleschi and Ghiberti: The Rivalry that Ignited the Renaissance

Wednesday, August 31, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

The 1401 competition between master artists Lorenzo Ghiberti and Filippo Brunelleschi for the commission to create a set of bronze doors for the Florence Baptistry is generally considered the event that fueled the Renaissance. Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in the Italian Renaissance, explores the creative duel that led to competitions among great artists becoming one of the central leitmotifs of the period. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar

Tangier and Smith Islands: Beauty and Peril

Wednesday, August 31, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Tangier Island, Virginia, and Smith Island, Maryland, are communities inextricably connected to the Chesapeake Bay. Enjoy a visual narrative by author and photographer Jay Fleming that explores their environment, communities, and commercial fisheries.

Studio Arts Course

Composition

Thursday, September 1, 2022 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

This course examines fundamental concepts of composition and their practical application in studio-art practice, offering participants tools to enrich their own work as well as to analyze and appreciate visual art in general. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course

Collage and Mixed-Media Intensive

Thursday, September 1, 2022 - 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Explore the materials, tools, and techniques used in collage and assemblage as you create an artwork that’s uniquely yours. The workshop, ideal for both nonartists and those with experience, is a great way to spark your creativity in two forms that offer wide possibilities for inventive expression.

Studio Arts Workshop

Out of Sight, Out of Mind: Drawing for the Everyday Overthinker

Thursday, September 1, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Get out of your head by drawing the world around you. Through simple drawing activities, learn how to better connect with your sense of vision, recognize how your mind colors your actions and experiences, and gain practice stepping away from your thoughts.

Lecture/Seminar

The Medici Villas: Tuscan Inspiration

Friday, September 2, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Used variously for pleasure and sports, scholarly pursuits, commercial enterprise, botanical experimentation, and amorous liaisons, the villas of the Medici family both expressed and influenced contemporary ideas on politics, philosophy, art, and design. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo explores several of the Medici’s public interests and private passions—and the architects they employed to create the luxurious backdrops for them. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course

Art and Kingship in Southeast Asia

Tuesday, September 6, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Art historian Robert DeCaroli examines the cultural and artistic traditions of ancient Southeast Asia from the earliest archaeological evidence to the onset of colonialism, with a particular focus on the royal arts of the great civilizations that arose within the borders of modern Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia, Burma (Myanmar), Vietnam, Laos, and Malaysia. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Studio Arts Workshop

Photo 101: Night Photography and Tripods

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

You don’t necessarily need great light to make a great photo. Understand the essentials of night photography and tripods as you learn to manage longer exposure times and exposure modes and compensation, choose the right tripod, work with remote shutter-release triggers, use your camera’s self-timer, and more.

Lecture/Seminar

Madame President: What Will It Take? with Capitol Hill Correspondent Ali Vitali

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

In-Person and Online Program: NBC News correspondent Ali Vitali witnessed a 2020 presidential election in which highly qualified and experienced women candidates again dealt with a different level of scrutiny than their male counterparts. She analyzes why it’s so hard for a woman to be taken seriously as a presidential contender, what will it take for men and women to be held to the same standard—and what happens next.

Lecture/Seminar

Spice 101: Cumin

Wednesday, September 7, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Take a gastronomical journey to explore one of the world's most widely used and oldest spices, cumin. Christine Rai discusses its origins and history, flavor profile and composition, and presence in global cuisines, and offers tips for using this internationally beloved spice in your own kitchen.

Course

Art and Fiction: When Words and Art Commune

Thursday, September 8, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

In this summer series, discover a “novel” way to explore the arts. Independent art historian Heidi Applegate explores the artists—Leonardo da Vinci, Judith Leyster, and Camille Pissarro—and paintings that inspired three works of art-focused historical fiction. This session discusses Alice Hoffman's The Marriage of Opposites. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course

Animal Portraits

Thursday, September 8, 2022 - 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

Capture the essence of your favorite animal or pet in a one-of-a-kind acrylic portrait filled with color, personality, and affection.

Lecture/Seminar

The Vice Presidency: Power on Hold

Thursday, September 8, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Once dismissed as “not worth a bucket of warm spit,” over the years the vice presidency has emerged as a more respected position since its office holders became closer high-level policy advisers to presidents. Veteran White House correspondent, historian, and author Ken Walsh explores how those who served in the second-highest post in American government contributed to the evolving state of the vice presidency.

Lecture/Seminar

Nikola Tesla: An Inventor Re-invents Military Technology

Friday, September 9, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

In the 21st century, the life and accomplishments of inventor, engineer, and futurist Nikola Tesla have risen from almost total obscurity to topics of fresh interest. Author Marc J. Seifer, one of the world’s leading Tesla experts, surveys his most significant discoveries that continue to influence today's military technology and diplomatic strategies.

Course

The Private Space Industry Revolution

Friday, September 9, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

We’re living through a revolution in the private space industry, but with the potential for increased light pollution, satellite collisions, and the formation of “mega-constellations” of satellites in Earth’s orbit, do the pros outweigh the cons of this explosive growth? Leading astronomers and pioneers in the private space industry weigh in on the future in a fascinating four-part series presented in cooperation with George Mason University Observatory. This session showcases space policy issues.

Lecture/Seminar

Medieval England's Art and Archaeology

Saturday, September 10, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Historian Cheryl White examines four significant monuments of art and archaeology of medieval England—the Sutton Hoo ship burial, the Lindisfarne Gospels, the Bayeux Tapestry, and Canterbury Cathedral—each of which points to a specific turning point in the historical narrative of the 7th through 14th centuries. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Studio Arts Workshop

Visual Journaling: Creativity Workout

Saturday, September 10, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

In a morning of artistic experimentation designed to deepen skills in visual expression, explore five modes of visual thinking including working from memory, observation, imagination, narrative, and experimental approaches.

Studio Arts Course

Introduction to iPhone Photography

Saturday, September 10, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

Put away your point-and-shoot camera. Learn to make the most of your iPhone’s camera, starting with essential photography basics and moving on to some of the best apps, camera accessories, and low-cost tools for editing and image management.

Lecture/Seminar

Exploring the American Revolution: Yorktown and the French Alliance

Tuesday, September 13, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

The climactic battle of the American Revolution, the siege of Yorktown, was a decisive win for George Washington’s Continental Army. Historian Richard Bell analyzes why it was also a triumph for the unlikely but essential wartime alliance forged between patriot revolutionaries and France’s king, Louis XVI.

Lecture/Seminar

The Age of Elegance: Fashion in the 1930s

Tuesday, September 13, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Despite the hardships of the Depression, anyone with a quarter could dream about the glamorous world conjured up by Hollywood—and the era’s innovative fashion designers. Design historian Elizabeth Lay shares the stories and images of the age, one in which film royalty and actual royalty shaped how women and men yearned to dress.

Lecture/Seminar

Rockin' TV: From Elvis to the Monkees

Wednesday, September 14, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Though rock music found a surprising home on mainstream TV in the mid-1950s, the 1964 appearance of the Beatles on “The Ed Sullivan Show” would change the face of pop culture, leading to an explosion of televised rock. Media expert Brian Rose offers a lively survey of the fascinating history of how rock and television grew up together.

Studio Arts Course

Understanding Your Digital Mirrorless or SLR Camera

Wednesday, September 14, 2022 - 1:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET

Get the most out of your digital mirrorless or SLR camera by taking part in this workshop, which provides a solid introduction to these cameras’ features and potential.

Studio Arts Workshop

Photo 101: Apertures, Shutter Speeds, and Exposure Modes

Wednesday, September 14, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Take command of your photographic vision as you learn the basics of your camera’s exposure functions. Learn to control the properties of your images through the understanding of apertures, shutter speeds, depth of field, shutter motion effects, equivalent exposures, and exposure modes.

Lecture/Seminar

Insurrection in a Bavarian Beer Hall: Hitler’s Failed Putsch and Its Consequences

Wednesday, September 14, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Munich was not Adolf Hitler’s hometown, but when he made it the headquarters of the Nazi party it became a critical steppingstone in his political rise. Historian Michael Brenner delves into what happened in that city during the ensuing years, why its transformation is crucial for understanding the Nazi era and the tragedy of the Holocaust, and how a failed coup known as the beer hall putsch turned into a successful grab for power many years later.

Lecture/Seminar

Taking Control of Your Cancer Risk with WebMD’s John Whyte

Wednesday, September 14, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

In-Person and Online Program: Despite what many people think, says physician John Whyte, chief medical officer of WebMD, most cancer is not caused by genetics, but rather lifestyle. He offers guidelines on factors including food, exercise, and stress management that can reduce your cancer risk and help you on a journey to better health.

Lecture/Seminar

Rick Martínez: Mi Cocina - A Culinary Journey of Self-discovery

Thursday, September 15, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

In 2019, food writer Rick Martínez undertook a culinary journey that covered Mexico, 32 states, 56 cities, and 20,000 miles. He wanted more than to experience new tastes: It was a chance to find and embrace his identity as a third-generation Mexican American. Join Martínez as he discusses the recipes in his new cookbook Mi Cocina, the stories behind them, and their connection to his journey of self-discovery.

Lecture/Seminar

Understanding Art: A Guide to the Basics

Friday, September 16, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. ET

The visual arts enrich our lives in many ways, bringing us innovative ideas, the pleasure of beauty, and a range of emotions—while also puzzling us at times. Art historian Janetta Rebold Benton highlights the fundamentals shared by all the visual arts and provides a guide to honing essential visual literacy skills that enable us to understand concepts conveyed without words. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Course

The Private Space Industry Revolution

Friday, September 16, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

We’re living through a revolution in the private space industry, but with the potential for increased light pollution, satellite collisions, and the formation of “mega-constellations” of satellites in Earth’s orbit, do the pros outweigh the cons of this explosive growth? Leading astronomers and pioneers in the private space industry weigh in on the future in a fascinating four-part series presented in cooperation with George Mason University Observatory. This session showcases the vulnerabilities of the night sky.

Course

Lunchtime with a Curator: Decorative Arts Design Series

Monday, September 19, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay as she hosts an image-rich series on decorative arts and design topics with guests. In this fall lunchtime program, Lay's guest is Diana Pardue, chief curator at the Heard Museum in Phoenix, who surveys the design evolution of Native American jewelry.

Lecture/Seminar

Baltimore Neighborhoods: Mount Washington

Monday, September 19, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Hilly—but far from mountainous—Mount Washington is a residential neighborhood of choice and a destination within the city limits for a variety of activities. Arts journalist and former Baltimore resident Richard Selden continues his survey of Charm City neighborhoods with a virtual tour of Mount Washington, focusing on notable sites that define its history and character.

Lecture/Seminar

Regency London's "Ton": The Business of Pleasure

Monday, September 19, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

As fans of “Bridgerton” know, the “Ton” were the envied, trendsetting celebrities of the early 19th century. Historian Julie Taddeo looks beyond the glamour to examine the men and women who lived "in the fashionable mode" and for whom exacting rules circumscribed every area of social and personal conduct.

Lecture/Seminar

Miles Davis: Prince of Style

Tuesday, September 20, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Miles Davis was a restless innovator, controversial celebrity, and the dominant jazz figure of the second half of the 20th century. In a program highlighted by clips and musical recordings, John Edward Hasse, longtime curator of American music at the National Museum of American History, recounts Davis’s struggles against racism, convention, and his own demons.

Lecture/Seminar

Building the Panama Canal: A Controversial Symbol of American Might

Tuesday, September 20, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Building the Panama Canal early in the 20th century was either a bold, decisive diplomatic stroke that claimed America’s rightful place on the world stage or a crude display of arrogance and corruption. Historian Ralph Nurnberger examines the sweep of the canal saga and addresses such problematic issues as why the U.S. claimed the right to build a canal in another country, and why Panama was chosen.

Lecture/Seminar

Tiffany Glass from the Neustadt Collection

Tuesday, September 20, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Take a behind-the-scenes look at works by Louis C. Tiffany and his studios in the preeminent Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass in Queens, New York. Lindsy Parrott, the collection’s executive director and curator, shares highlights of this extraordinary assemblage encompassing lamps, windows, metalwork, and rare archival materials—and offers tips on spotting authentic Tiffany works among the forgeries.

Lecture/Seminar

Orson Welles: A Turbulent and Brilliant Life

Wednesday, September 21, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Hailed at 25 for his monumental Citizen Kane, the prolific Orson Welles was cursed with being ahead of his time. From his highbrow choices of subject matter to the rule-shattering filmmaking techniques he employed, he was an outsider from the outset—and Hollywood never forgave him for it. Film historian Max Alvarez surveys a career that saw Welles fall from boy genius to industry exile, despite his undervalued and often extraordinary post-Kane cinematic achievements.

Lecture/Seminar

The Rosetta Stone, a Key to the Past

Wednesday, September 21, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Two hundred years ago, French historian and linguist Jean-Francois Champollion deciphered the hieroglyphics inscribed on a slab of black stone found in Egypt in 1799—finally cracking the code to the ancient Egyptians’ enigmatic writing system. Historian Gary Rendsburg unfolds the exciting story of one of the most important archaeological discoveries of all time.

Studio Arts Workshop

Photo 101: Understanding ISO

Wednesday, September 21, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Students learn how to use their ISO settings to darken and brighten photos, and how this relates to other camera settings such as aperture and shutter speed.

Lecture/Seminar

Sean Carroll: Demystifying Physics

Wednesday, September 21, 2022 - 7:30 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

Someone has to be the go-to explainer of mind-bending equations in physics. Sean Carroll is that person, offering deep insights into the workings of the universe—and making it comprehensible. Carroll pulls back the veil of mystery cloaking the most valuable building blocks of modern science as he explains the fundamental ideas informing the modern physics of reality.

Lecture/Seminar

The Dome of the Rock

Thursday, September 22, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Dominating the skyline of Jerusalem for more than 1,300 years, the Dome of the Rock is both a sacred Islamic shrine and an iconic symbol of the Holy City. What messages did the artists who built it enshrine here, and what does this World Heritage Site have to say to us today? Barbara Boehm, curator emerita of the Met Cloisters explores this remarkable place, including its history, mosaics, and inscriptions, and its enduring meaning. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar

Boost Your Emotional Fitness

Thursday, September 22, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Increased uncertainty, constant change, and ongoing challenges are leading to new levels of stress, feeling overwhelmed, and burnout. Nataly Kogan, speaker, author, and host of the Awesome Human podcast, shares research in neuroscience and psychology that provides the foundation for practical strategies that can help individuals reduce stress, boost resilience, and meet difficult times with less struggle and greater energy.

Lecture/Seminar

The Ultimate Guide to the Food-Friendly Wines of Beaujolais

Friday, September 23, 2022 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

The marvelous region that straddles Burgundy and the Rhône Valley has much more to offer than the Beaujolais Nouveau. In a tasting led by award-winning sommelier Erik Segelbaum, discover why wine professionals and foodies alike consider the white, pink, and red rainbow of Beaujolais the perfect wines for fall and the holidays. Part of a 3-session summer series, this immersive program includes a curated personal tasting kit to enhance the experience.

Course

The Private Space Industry Revolution

Friday, September 23, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

We’re living through a revolution in the private space industry, but with the potential for increased light pollution, satellite collisions, and the formation of “mega-constellations” of satellites in Earth’s orbit, do the pros outweigh the cons of this explosive growth? Leading astronomers and pioneers in the private space industry weigh in on the future in a fascinating four-part series presented in cooperation with George Mason University Observatory. This session showcases mega-constellations.

Studio Arts Course

Introduction to iPhone Photography

Saturday, September 24, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

Put away your point-and-shoot camera. Learn to make the most of your iPhone’s camera, starting with essential photography basics and moving on to some of the best apps, camera accessories, and low-cost tools for editing and image management.

Lecture/Seminar

The Untouchable Eliot Ness

Monday, September 26, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

As the leader of a team of federal agents known as the Untouchables, Eliot Ness’ two-fisted enforcement of Prohibition-era laws and relentless pursuit of mob boss Al Capone cemented his image as the embodiment of uncompromising justice. Join author Daniel Stashower and actor Scott Seder as they bring this icon to life, from his early exploits in Chicago to his unprecedented manhunt for America’s version of Jack the Ripper.

Course

Write Into Art: Creative Writing Inspired by Visual Art

Tuesday, September 27, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for a series of five online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This writing session is inspired by Glen John’s A Corner of the Artist’s Room in Paris.

Lecture/Seminar

Margaret Beaufort and the Making of the Tudor Dynasty

Tuesday, September 27, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Margaret Beaufort cannily navigated the Wars of the Roses with a single goal in mind: assuring the royal future of her son Henry Tudor, later King Henry VII. Tudor scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger explores the rise of this matriarch within the fractious courts of the late 15th century and why she emerged as one of the most powerful women in England.

Lecture/Seminar

Extinctions on Earth: Then and Now

Tuesday, September 27, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Andrew H. Knoll, a professor of natural history and earth and planetary sciences at Harvard University, discusses the five moments over the past 500 million years when most of Earth’s animal species disappeared, how those past events relate to 21st-century global change, and what lessons may be learned for preserving our planet’s precious and precarious biodiversity for future generations.

Lecture/Seminar

The Legal Legacy of Jim Crow

Wednesday, September 28, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

In-Person and Online Program: Margaret A. Burnham, director of Northeastern University’s Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project, investigates the violence of the Jim Crow–era, the legal apparatus that sustained it, and its enduring legacy. As she maps the criminal legal system in the mid-20th-century South, she traces its line back to slavery and forward to the legal structures of today.

Lecture/Seminar

Understanding Alzheimer’s Disease and the Dementias: What We Know, What We Can Do

Thursday, September 29, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Alzheimer’s disease, and the dementias in general, are among the most-feared consequences of being lucky enough to survive into older age. Barry Gordon, a nationally recognized expert on memory and memory disorders, sheds light on these debilitating conditions and provides guidance on what you need to know to take the most informed and active steps if faced with one of them—whether personally or in a family member or friend.

Lecture/Seminar

How Baseball Became A National Pastime

Thursday, September 29, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

For sports historian Kenneth Cohen, how baseball quickly surpassed other pastimes and became a primary symbol of American uniqueness by the end of the 19th century is a story that’s partly about the powers of marketing in a modernizing nation and partly about the genuinely democratizing potential of a game that everyone could play. Join him as he explores baseball's rise and the decidedly undemocratic response it sparked, as well as the debate about whether it continues to deserve its eminent status as our national pastime today.

Lecture/Seminar

Art, Architecture, and Ambition in Aragonese Naples

Friday, September 30, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The fall of Naples in 1442 not only brought Spanish rule, it transformed the city into a vital center of artistic production. Join Sophia D’Addio, a lecturer in art history at Columbia University, in an exploration of paintings, sculptures, medals, and architecture commissioned by the Aragonese rulers of Naples, most notably the commissions and collections of King Alfonso of Aragon. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course

The Private Space Industry Revolution

Friday, September 30, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

We’re living through a revolution in the private space industry, but with the potential for increased light pollution, satellite collisions, and the formation of “mega-constellations” of satellites in Earth’s orbit, do the pros outweigh the cons of this explosive growth? Leading astronomers and pioneers in the private space industry weigh in on the future in a fascinating four-part series presented in cooperation with George Mason University Observatory. This session showcases SpaceX and the commerical space industry.

Lecture/Seminar

Philosophy in the Middle Ages: A Harmony of Faith and Reason

Saturday, October 1, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The medieval period in Western thought, once viewed disparagingly by scholars as the Dark Ages, has come to be recognized as a time of rich philosophic investigation and lively debate. Gregory T. Doolan, associate professor of philosophy at The Catholic University of America, explores the work of notable Christian, Muslim, and Jewish thinkers from the major periods of medieval philosophy.

Course

Lunchtime with a Curator: Decorative Arts Design Series

Monday, October 3, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay as she hosts an image-rich series on decorative arts and design topics with guests. In this fall lunchtime program, Lay's guest is decorative arts curator Amy McHugh, who traces how treasures from France’s Crown Jewels found their way into the wardrobes of America’s Gilded-Age heiresses.

Lecture/Seminar

Evolutionary Medicine: Why Do We Get Sick?

Monday, October 3, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

Evolutionary medicine is a rapidly growing field that uses knowledge from modern evolutionary biology to better understand, prevent, and treat disease. Rui Diogo, associate professor of anatomy at Howard University’s College of Medicine, surveys its development, applications, and medical and societal implications, drawing on examples ranging from the historical origin of pandemics to state-of-the-art studies on cancer and social networks.

Lecture/Seminar

A Salute to Scavengers at Hawk Mountain

Monday, October 3, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

A rotting carcass might not sound like a bountiful buffet, but to avian scavengers it’s the best meal they could hope for. Aaron Prince, an educator and raptor care specialist at Pennsylvania’s Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, offers a look into the lives of scavenger species including vultures, ravens, crows, hawks, and eagles, their carnivorous eating habits, and what the world would potentially look like without them in it.

Course

Write Into Art: Creative Writing Inspired by Visual Art

Tuesday, October 4, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for a series of five online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This writing session is inspired by January Steen’s The Dancing Couple.

Course

More Stories from the American Songbook

Tuesday, October 4, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

For decades we’ve danced, romanced, and dreamed to songs like “As Time Goes By,” “Night and Day,” and other enduring gems. In an afternoon series, filmmaker and cultural historian Sara Lukinson traces how some of our favorite songs came to be and how different artists, unexpected arrangements, and changing times transformed them into something brand new, yet still the same. This session spotlights the following songs: "Night and Day" and "I've Got You Under My Skin."

Lecture/Seminar

Russia: Revolution and Civil War

Wednesday, October 5, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Between 1917 and 1921 a devastating struggle took place in Russia following the collapse of the Tsarist empire. Author Antony Beevor brings the conflict to life through the eyes of firsthand accounts, vivid and powerful personal stories that offer an epic view of the events that reshaped Eastern Europe and set the stage for the rest of the 20th century.

Lecture/Seminar

Whistler: Departing from Tradition in Making Art

Wednesday, October 5, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

James Abbott McNeill Whistler is celebrated for his bold and innovative style in a variety of media—all informed by influences that encompass the Aesthetic movement, Asian art, and his own experimentation with abstract color and composition. Art historian Aneta Georgievska Shine takes a close look at how these ideals were expressed in his work, whether seen in subtle tonal landscapes or portrayals of women. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar

Jim Thorpe: Outracing the Odds

Thursday, October 6, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

In-Person and Online Program: Jim Thorpe rose to world fame as a mythic talent who excelled at every sport, but despite his colossal skills, his life was a struggle against the odds. Biographer David Maraniss discusses America’s greatest all-around athlete, a man who endured in the face of racism, alcohol abuse, broken marriages, and financial distress—and so did his myth.

Lecture/Seminar

Jacques Pépin on the Art of the Chicken

Thursday, October 6, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Legendary chef Jacques Pepin celebrates his love of chickens as he reminisces on his life through the lens of the humble bird. Spend a delightful evening listening to the chef recall his childhood and career, and his celebrated paintings of chickens (of course!). He also shares recipes, along with poignant memories and the stories behind them.

Lecture/Seminar

The Ghost Fleet of Mallows Bay

Thursday, October 6, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Historian and marine archaeologist Donald Grady Shomette recounts the fascinating tale of his decades-long historical and archaeological survey campaign to document what came to be called the Ghost Fleet of Mallows Bay.

Lecture/Seminar

The Judgement of Paris: The Origins of Impressionism

Friday, October 7, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Impressionism was born in the 1860s through a heated rivalry between painters Édouard Manet and Ernest Meissonier. The contest transcended artistic expression, encompassing competing viewpoints on the changes wrought by technology, politics, and personal freedom. Ross King, author of The Judgement of Paris, vividly explores the relationship between these artists as he evokes Parisian life during a decade of social and political ferment. (World Art History Certificate Program elective, 1/2 credit)

Course

Write Into Art: Creative Writing Inspired by Visual Art

Tuesday, October 11, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for a series of five online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This writing session is inspired by Paul Cadmus’s Bar Italia.

Studio Arts Course

Exploring Color in Watercolor

Tuesday, October 11, 2022 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Enhance your knowledge and understanding of color theory in watercolor. Learn practical skills such as identifying and mixing colors correctly to create your own cohesive palette.

Studio Arts Course

Painting Skies, Clouds, Trees, and Mountains in Watercolor

Tuesday, October 11, 2022 - 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Using watercolor, gain confidence in painting important natural elements. Demonstrations and exercises introduce techniques in creating flowing landscapes.

Studio Arts Course

Drawing Light… and How the Masters Did It

Tuesday, October 11, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

In this 4-session class, learn the strategies artists such as Rembrandt, Turner, and Cézanne, used to harness light and unify, intensify, and give dimension to their images. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar

Wild Wood: True Tales of Trees

Tuesday, October 11, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Join Liana Vitali, naturalist and educator at Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary in Maryland (and self-proclaimed tree-hugger), for an immersive audio-visual journey into the fascinatingly complicated and connected life of trees—from their first tiny emergence through the topsoil as seedlings, to their lasting value to forest life as fallen logs.

Studio Arts Course

Introduction to Photography

Wednesday, October 12, 2022 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Whether you want to work in digital or film, this course offers a solid foundation for new photographers ready to learn the basics.

Lecture/Seminar

Cezanne: The Father of Modern Art

Wednesday, October 12, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

For Picasso, Paul Cezanne was simply “the father of us all.” Art historian Joseph Cassar examines key works that reflect how this pioneer of modernism pointed to future developments in art. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course

Altered Books

Wednesday, October 12, 2022 - 1:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Create your own story as you learn to upcycle book pages as surfaces for drawing, painting, and collage using gelatin plate prints, textures, photo transfers, drawing, painting, and text redaction.

Studio Arts Course

Collage and Mixed-Media

Wednesday, October 12, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Students are introduced to the materials, tools, and technologies used in collage and assemblage. They find inspiration in artists who worked in collage including Joseph Cornell, Romare Bearden, and Gertrude Green.

Studio Arts Workshop

Photo 101: Aspect Ratios

Wednesday, October 12, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Gain an understanding of aspect ratios (digital sensors and film). The class explores changing the aspect ratio in camera, aspect-ratio constraints in cropping and post-production, and use of the Photoshop image size and canvas size commands.

Lecture/Seminar

Art Crimes: Trailing Modern Treasure Hunters

Wednesday, October 12, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Join expert on art fraud and former FBI agent Robert K. Wittman on his journey around the world as the senior investigator and founder of the FBI National Art Crime Team. He recounts assignments worthy of a spy novel that nabbed the tomb robbers, thieves, looters, and criminals who are the financial engine of the multi-billion-dollar international industry in illicit artifacts.

Lecture/Seminar

Howard Baskerville: An American Martyr in Iran with Author Reza Aslan

Wednesday, October 12, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

In-Person and Online Program: In the early 20th century, Howard Baskerville, a young Christian missionary from South Dakota, traveled to Persia (modern-day Iran) to preach the gospel. But it would be political activism and not Christianity that would define his life and lead to his death as a martyr in a foreign land. Historian and author Reza Aslan highlights the complex and historic ties between America and Iran and the potential of a single individual to change the course of history.

Studio Arts Course

Portrait Painting in Oil and Acrylic

Wednesday, October 12, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Learn how to paint expressive portraits as you improve your observational skills, the ability to see angles and shapes, and your understanding of color and value. The class emphasizes how to define a subject’s unique features by determining shapes of light and shadow.

Studio Arts Course

The Art of Floral Design

Wednesday, October 12, 2022 - 7:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Explore the spectrum of floral design. Sourcing (with a focus on sustainability), making the most of seasonal flowers, creating centerpieces, wiring techniques, and photographing your work are all among the practical areas covered. 

Studio Arts Course

Bobbin Lace: Beyond the Basics

Thursday, October 13, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Explore many new techniques and build new skills as you create four small projects in an intermediate-level course.

Studio Arts Course

Exploring Abstraction

Thursday, October 13, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Explore the basis of abstraction by studying color, line, and shape as they relate to composition. Learn to create exciting and innovative works of art, using a series of drawing and painting exercises designed to examine non-traditional ways of handling traditional materials and subject matter.

Course

Supernatural Classics: Musical Magic, Ghouls, and Ghosts

Thursday, October 13, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET

From “The Sorcerer’s Apprentice” to Don Giovanni to the “Mephisto Waltz,” classical composers have long delighted in taking audiences on deliciously spooky excursions into the musical realms of the supernatural. In the perfect overture to Halloween, lecturer and concert pianist Rachel Franklin leads a hair-raising tour of some of the best-loved classical music haunts, spotlighting works that offer encounters with spectral creatures, ghost ships, demonic valets, trolls, devils, and necromancers.

Studio Arts Workshop

Photo 101: Exposures and Histograms

Thursday, October 13, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Beginning photographers learn how to use histograms, a graphic display of the brightness levels of pixels in an image—and an essential guide to achieving the correct exposure.  

Lecture/Seminar

Is God a Mathematician?

Thursday, October 13, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

From ancient times to the present scientists and philosophers have marveled at how such a seemingly abstract discipline as mathematics, which appears to have been a product of human thought, could so perfectly explain the natural world. In a fascinating presentation, astrophysicist Mario Livio explores why mathematics is a powerful lens through which to examine the cosmos.

Lecture/Seminar

Homer's Iliad and Odyssey: Enduring Lessons from Ancient Classics

Thursday, October 13, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Homer’s masterpieces the Iliad and Odyssey helped the ancient Greeks understand, through oral recitation, the tribulations of their world. Joseph Luzzi, a professor of comparative literature at Bard College, explores the idea that we can also use these epics to make sense of some of the greatest cultural, political, and social problems we face today.

Lecture/Seminar

World War II and the Rise of American Intelligence

Thursday, October 13, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Author and long-time intelligence officer Nicholas Reynolds draws on his new book Need to Know to survey the full story of the birth of American intelligence in the 1940s, as well as the larger-than-life leaders and spies who would shape espionage during wartime and beyond.

Lecture/Seminar

A Night in NorCal: California's Iconic Wine Regions

Friday, October 14, 2022 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

The North Coast region, comprising Napa, Sonoma, Lake, and Mendocino counties, produces nearly every style of wine imaginable. In a delicious exploration led by sommelier Erik Segelbaum, discover why these regions have put America on the global map as a world-class wine producer.

Lecture/Seminar

The History of France: Four More Turning Points

Saturday, October 15, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

France is the product of a centuries-long evolution during which a multitude of regional societies and cultures was welded together willingly—or more often forcibly—by a succession of monarchs, ministers, and commanders. Historian Alexander Mikaberidze examines four historical moments that marked crucial points in the emergence of France: the opening of Versailles; the invasion of Italy by King Charles VIII; the transformation of young humanist lawyer Jean Cauvin into John Calvin; and the world’s first conference to standardize measurements across the world.

Studio Arts Course

Introduction to Lightroom

Saturday, October 15, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Adobe Lightroom is the most useful (and user friendly) software for organizing and editing images, usable for both RAW and JPEG image files. This two-session workshop offers users an overview of the program, with a focus on working with the essential Library and Develop modules for organizing and editing your files.

Studio Arts Course

Keeping Up the Sketchbook Habit

Saturday, October 15, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Enrich your sketchbooking skill with new techniques. Learn how to map your day, get creative with colored pencil on mid-tone kraft paper, and draw one object over multiple weeks.

Studio Arts Course

Visual Journaling: Creativity Intensive

Saturday, October 15, 2022 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

In three intensive sessions focused on artistic experimentation, create a journal using prompts and focused practices.

Studio Arts Workshop

Out of Sight, Out of Mind: Drawing for the Everyday Overthinker

Saturday, October 15, 2022 - 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Get out of your head by drawing the world around you. Through simple drawing activities, learn how to better connect with your sense of vision, recognize how your mind colors your actions and experiences, and gain practice stepping away from your thoughts.

Lecture/Seminar

Jodi Picoult and Jennifer Finney Boylan: A Novel Duo

Saturday, October 15, 2022 - 6:00 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. ET

In-Person and Online Program: New York Times bestselling author Jodi Picoult is known for her compelling storytelling that thoughtfully tackles contemporary issues. For her latest novel, she teamed up with author Jennifer Finney Boylan to create the suspenseful Mad Honey. Join them as they discuss what it was like to work together and their inspiration behind the novel.

Studio Arts Course

Beginning Drawing

Sunday, October 16, 2022 - 10:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. ET

This introductory course teaches the basic skills needed for drawing. Working with a variety of materials and techniques, including charcoal and pencils, students explore the rendering of geometric forms, volume, and perspective, with an emphasis on personal gesture marks.

Studio Arts Course

Artful Mind, Tranquil Mind

Monday, October 17, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

In an artist-led series designed to provide a tranquil mid-day break, create small but satisfying works of art as a way to hit “pause” and incorporate a bit of creativity into your at-home routines.

Course

Lunchtime with a Curator: Decorative Arts Design Series

Monday, October 17, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay as she hosts an image-rich series on decorative arts and design topics with guests. In this fall lunchtime program, Lay's guest is period jewelry specialist Sheila Smithie, who offers insights into the creation of stunning, classically inspired pieces from Europe’s fabled 19th-century Revival jewelers.

Studio Arts Course

Curating a Life: Art as Memoir

Monday, October 17, 2022 - 1:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Keep a visual-thinking journal and learn to see like an artist and create personally meaningful works of art in terms of form, theme, and context. Use text, images, and newly developed visual thinking skills to create a “memoir museum”—a handmade map that traces where you’ve been in your life and where you have yet to explore.

Studio Arts Course

Continued Watercolor

Monday, October 17, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

A continued study of watercolor techniques provides the opportunity for greater individual experimentation and expression. Go beyond the basics of paint application, constructing strong, vibrant, personality-filled paintings.

Studio Arts Course

Kitchen Table Collage

Monday, October 17, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Explore creating unique mixed-media artworks by using food and plant-based items, recycled materials, and household tools and implements to fashion colors, make stencils, and add textures.

Lecture/Seminar

The Life and Times of Norman Cousins: A Peacemaker in the Atomic Age

Monday, October 17, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Best remembered as the longtime editor of the influential weekly magazine Saturday Review, Norman Cousins was also engaged in secret missions behind the Iron Curtain to conduct high-stakes negotiations directly with the Soviet leadership during the decades after WWII. Historian Allen Pietrobon discusses his enormous impact on the course of American public debate, international humanitarianism, and Cold-War diplomacy.

Studio Arts Course

Beginning Drawing

Monday, October 17, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

This introductory course teaches the basic skills needed for drawing. Working with a variety of materials and techniques, including charcoal and pencils, students explore the rendering of geometric forms, volume, and perspective, with an emphasis on personal gesture marks.

Course

Write Into Art: Creative Writing Inspired by Visual Art

Tuesday, October 18, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for a series of five online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This writing session is inspired by Scherezade García’s Day Dreaming/Soñando despierta.

Course

More Stories from the American Songbook

Tuesday, October 18, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

For decades we’ve danced, romanced, and dreamed to songs like “As Time Goes By,” “Night and Day,” and other enduring gems. In an afternoon series, filmmaker and cultural historian Sara Lukinson traces how some of our favorite songs came to be and how different artists, unexpected arrangements, and changing times transformed them into something brand new, yet still the same. This session spotlights the following songs: "As Time Goes By" and "These Foolish Things."

Lecture/Seminar

Shakespeare and Company: The Bookshop That Shaped the Lost Generation

Tuesday, October 18, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

In 1919, an American woman named Sylvia Beach opened Shakespeare and Company, an English-language bookshop and lending library on the Left Bank of Paris. In the decades that followed, it became the heart of a community of writers and artists now known as the Lost Generation. Joshua Kotin, an associate professor of English at Princeton University, draws on a treasury of Beach’s personal and business records to create a vivid portrait of a period and place that changed literary history.

Lecture/Seminar

Zingerman's Deli Turns 40

Tuesday, October 18, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

The iconic Zingerman’s Delicatessen in Ann Arbor, Michigan, opened in 1982 as a traditional Jewish deli and food shop that sold great stacked sandwiches and delicious baked goods. Less known is its role in building new food-business opportunities for others in the area. Co-founder Ari Weinzweig joins Christopher W. Wilson, director of experience design at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, to discuss Zingerman’s story and unique approach to management and leadership.

Lecture/Seminar

The Films of Alfred Hitchcock

Wednesday, October 19, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

In a career spanning 5 decades, film director Alfred Hitchcock made 54 films, including such classics as The 39 Steps, Rebecca, Notorious, Rear Window, North by Northwest, Vertigo, and Psycho. Brian Rose, professor emeritus at Fordham University, looks at Hitchcock’s achievements as the Master of Suspense and through dozens of film clips, examines his extraordinary creativity as one of the 20th century’s greatest filmmakers.

Studio Arts Course

Written in Fabric: Memory Messages Through Quilts

Wednesday, October 19, 2022 - 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Create your own memory block through writing prompts, mindfulness practices, and design and color principles for fiber artists. Learn techniques from hand piecing and machine and hand appliqué, to creating text using needle and thread.

Lecture/Seminar

The Art of John Singer Sargent: Virtuosic Portraits, Seductive Dancers, Luscious Landscapes

Wednesday, October 19, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Famed for his opulent portraits of members of Gilded-Age society, John Singer Sargent was prolific, versatile, and sometimes controversial. Art historian Nancy G. Heller discusses Sargent’s colorful life and examines his most important works, including a selection of drawings and paintings to be featured in the National Gallery of Art’s upcoming exhibition Sargent in Spain. She also considers his place within the broader scope of Western art history and discusses what new scholarship reveals about his life and work. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course

Slow Shutter-Speed Photography

Wednesday, October 19, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Slow things down as you learn to capture movement and low light scenes with longer shutter speeds. Topics covered include panning, zoom effect, intentional camera movement, tripods, drive modes, neutral density filters and the camera settings required to take slow shutter-speed photos in bright light, low light, twilight, and night.

Lecture/Seminar

The Spanish Civil War: A Rehearsal for WWII

Wednesday, October 19, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Between July 1936 and April 1939, Spain suffered a bloody civil war as a coalition of Nationalists under Generalissimo Francisco Franco staged an insurrection against the Second Spanish Republic. But the Spanish Civil War had a significance far beyond the Iberian peninsula: It revealed antecedents of the massive global conflict to come. Christopher Hamner, a professor of history at George Mason University, explores the war and its impact on the world.

Studio Arts Course

Introduction to Watercolor

Thursday, October 20, 2022 - 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Beginning students as well as experienced painters explore watercolor techniques and learn new approaches to painting through demonstration, discussion, and experimentation.

Studio Arts Course

Techniques in Modernist Painting

Thursday, October 20, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Experiment with a variety of painting styles such as cubism, suprematism, and abstract expressionism to learn practical applications of the concepts and techniques of modernism. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar

The Stories Behind English Spelling: An Awesome Mess

Thursday, October 20, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

What’s behind the spelling of colonel? Or knight? Why is it four but also forty? Linguist Anne Curzan discusses why an examination of the ever-evolving language whose spelling has been described as “an awesome mess” reveals a treasure trove of wild and wonderful stories about its history and the people who have spoken it (and grappled with its quirks) across the centuries.

Studio Arts Course

Mastering Exposure

Thursday, October 20, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Take your skills beyond auto mode as you explore a myriad of your digital camera’s exposure options and features in this course designed for intermediate photographers.

Course

Reading Faulkner: Chronicler of the Deep South in Literature

Thursday, October 20, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Mississippi-born William Faulkner stands as one of the greatest, and one of the most problematic, figures in American literature. Michael Gorra, professor of English language and literature at Smith College and author of The Saddest Words: William Faulkner’s Civil War, focuses on three of Faulkner’s greatest novels to uncover the complexities behind the man and the writer.

Lecture/Seminar

The Geologic Past of the Mid-Atlantic Region

Thursday, October 20, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Who knew that beneath our feet is evidence of magma chambers, giant sharks, Himalayan-sized mountains, and the breakup of several supercontinents? Geologist Callan Bentley leads a fascinating exploration of the Mid-Atlantic region that explores an extraordinary history spanning more than a billion years of geologic time.

Studio Arts Course

Build a Tiny Interior

Friday, October 21, 2022 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

In this mixed-media challenge, imagine your dream home, then bring its tiny interior to life using papier-maché, acrylics, and other techniques.

Lecture/Seminar

Cultural Heritage Sites of China

Saturday, October 22, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

From the grand splendor of the Forbidden City and the Summer Palace to the serene beauty of the gardens of Suzhou and the grand tombs of Ming and Qing dynasty rulers, spend a day with art historian Robert DeCaroli as he introduces spectacular places in China that are UNESCO World Heritage Sites. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Studio Arts Course

Quick-Sketch Watercolors: A European Tour

Saturday, October 22, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. ET

Capture your virtual travels, from hilltop villages to the sea, drawing and painting a variety of scenes using loose lines and painterly colors.

Studio Arts Course

iPhone Photography II

Saturday, October 22, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

Take your iPhone camera skills to another level in a two-day workshop that focuses on the ProCamera app and editing techniques; organizing, printing, and posting your photos; and a critique session on images.

Lecture/Seminar

What We Don’t Know About Dinosaurs

Sunday, October 23, 2022 - 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

In just the past twenty years, we have learned more about dinosaurs than we did in the previous two centuries. Paleontologist David Hone discusses the extraordinary advances beginning to solve many of the mysteries surrounding these marvelous prehistoric creatures, considers the gaps in our knowledge that remain, and charts new directions for tomorrow’s generation of dinosaur scientists.

Program

Steve Case Drives Them To Succeed

Monday, October 24, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. ET

Entrepreneur Steve Case recognized that jobs and opportunity spurred by technology were concentrated in a select few coastal cities. In response, he launched Rise of the Rest, a nationwide platform to back and spotlight innovative startups outside of Silicon Valley. Join Case as he shares some of the success stories of these startup communities, all leveraging regional strengths and betting on the future of innovation beyond the country’s usual tech hubs.

Course

Write Into Art: Creative Writing Inspired by Visual Art

Tuesday, October 25, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for a series of five online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This writing session is inspired by Emma Amos’s Winning.

Course

Medieval History Through Artists’ Eyes

Tuesday, October 25, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Dazzling early Christian mosaics, sumptuous Carolingian illuminated manuscripts, sculpted Romanesque church facades, and soaring Gothic cathedrals give artistic expression to an astonishing variety of beliefs and practices linked by a vision of leading the human spirit toward eternal life. Art historian Judy Scott Feldman examines the art of the thousand-year period between classical antiquity and the Renaissance and its relationship to a diverse society infused with faith and spirituality. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar

500 Years of Anne Boleyn: The Woman Who Changed England’s History

Tuesday, October 25, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Ever since her life and death in the 16th century, historians and cultural representations have portrayed Anne Boleyn as a devout religious reformer, a blindly ambitious social climber, a heartless homewrecker, and everything in between. In a year that marks the 500th anniversary of Anne’s debut in the court of Henry VIII, Tudor scholar and historian Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger explores the story of the real woman, which is often lost.

Studio Arts Course

Mosaics for Beginners

Tuesday, October 25, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Weekly lectures, demonstrations, and work-a-long periods provide a solid creative and technical foundation to working with mosaics. Select from 8 unique patterns designed by the instructor with the option to work either in glass tiles or unglazed porcelain.

Studio Arts Course

Tapestry Weaving

Tuesday, October 25, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET

Develop skills in a range of weaving techniques as you design and create a one-of-a kind miniature tapestry on a small-frame loom.

Lecture/Seminar

Confucianism and Daoism

Tuesday, October 25, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Confucianism and Daoism (Taoism), the two major indigenous religions of China, present worldviews that contrast not only with Western thought, but with each other. Charles Jones, a professor of religion and culture at Catholic University of America, explores the basic teachings of the two traditions and their strategies for coexistence throughout Chinese history.

Lecture/Seminar

Ghostly Images in Japanese Art

Wednesday, October 26, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Female ghosts have been an enduring theme in the history of Japanese art, touching people’s deepest fears, curiosities, and imaginations. Yui Suzuki, an art historian specializing in Japanese religious art, explores the popularity and proliferation of these spectral images that haunt the art of the Edo period. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course

Dances of the World With PBS’s Mickela Mallozzi

Wednesday, October 26, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

In a globe-trotting series, Mickela Mallozzi, the executive producer and host of the popular PBS series “Bare Feet with Mickela Mallozzi,” explores the history and evolution of dances from three distinctive regions and their role in linking communities and generations. This session showcases dances from Ireland.

Studio Arts Course

Lightroom Tune-up

Wednesday, October 26, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

This fully hands-on and interactive class is designed for those who have already had a structured introduction to Lightroom and are familiar with the Library and Develop modules.

Studio Arts Workshop

Color Theory and Chroma-psychology Workshop

Thursday, October 27, 2022 - 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Learn how to make color choices in your art to bring out a reaction from the viewer. Create combinations with colored pencils that illustrate how color theory works.

Lecture/Seminar

Lerner and Loewe: Musical Champagne

Thursday, October 27, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

We’ve grown accustomed to their music. In temperament and background, lyricist Alan Jay Lerner and composer Frederick Loewe were wildly dissimilar, but their often-tempestuous relationship produced brilliantly crafted musicals rich with enduring songs. Pianist and American music specialist Robert Wyatt offers a sparkling toast to the team behind Brigadoon, Paint Your Wagon, My Fair Lady, Gigi, and Camelot.

Lecture/Seminar

The Acadian Diaspora

Thursday, October 27, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Late in 1755, an army of British regulars and Massachusetts volunteers launched one of the most ambitious and cruel military campaigns in North American history: the capture and exile of Nova Scotia’s French-speaking Catholic settlers known as Acadians. Historian Christopher Hodson of Brigham Young University explores the Acadian diaspora, interweaving the dramatic stories of its perpetrators and survivors with the wider history of 18th-century imperial conflict. 

Lecture/Seminar

Home Is Where the Art Is: Connecting Creativity and Place

Friday, October 28, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. ET

Did the houses, gardens, and locations where Leonardo da Vinci, Albrecht Dürer, Frida Kahlo, Claude Monet, Georgia O’Keeffe, Philip Johnson, and other leading creators lived directly influence their work? Art historian Janetta Rebold Benton surveys the private residences—and private lives—of painters, sculptors, and architects to explore this artistic connection. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar

Dining on the Rails: A Moveable Feast

Friday, October 28, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Hungry railroad passengers prior to the Civil War had meager choices for meals. But once George Pullman’s dining cars came on the scene in the late 19th century, a bountiful new era of service began that often rivaled fine restaurants and hotel dining rooms. Railroad historian Joe Nevin traces the colorful evolution of dining on the rails between the beginning of commercial service in 1830 and the advent of Amtrak using examples from the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, an Eastern pioneer of onboard services.

Program

Supernatural Classics Concert: Tales for Halloween

Friday, October 28, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

In-Person and Online Program: Just in time for Halloween, enjoy a thrills- and chills-packed lecture-recital from the chamber music ensemble SONOS, featuring pianist Rachel Franklin, violinist Christian Tremblay and bass player Jonathan Miles Brown. Players explore what constitutes “scary” music, trace the haunting influence of literary and historic sources on the Gothic, and take a playful look at the eternal fascination musicians have for the supernatural.

Studio Arts Course

Composition

Monday, October 31, 2022 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

This course examines fundamental concepts of composition and their practical application in studio-art practice, offering participants tools to enrich their own work as well to analyze and appreciate visual art in general. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course

More Stories from the American Songbook

Tuesday, November 1, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

For decades we’ve danced, romanced, and dreamed to songs like “As Time Goes By,” “Night and Day,” and other enduring gems. In an afternoon series, filmmaker and cultural historian Sara Lukinson traces how some of our favorite songs came to be and how different artists, unexpected arrangements, and changing times transformed them into something brand new, yet still the same. This session spotlights the following songs: "The Lady Is a Tramp" and "Mack the Knife."

Lecture/Seminar

The Revolutionary Samuel Adams

Tuesday, November 1, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

In-Person and Online Program: Thomas Jefferson once asserted that "for depth of purpose, zeal, and sagacity, no man in Congress exceeded, if any equaled, Sam Adams." But in spite of his celebrated status among America's Founding Fathers, Samuel Adams' life and achievements have been largely overshadowed in the history books. In a spirited conversation, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Stacy Schiff examines this often-overlooked founder.

Course

Giacomo Puccini: Master of Operatic Lyricism

Tuesday, November 1, 2022 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Rarely absent from the opera stages of the world, La bohème, Madame Butterfly, Tosca, and Turandot are treasured for their powerfully expressive music and poignant depictions of human emotions. Musicologist Daniel E. Freeman surveys Puccini’s four most popular operas with an emphasis on the ways in which they reflect the composer’s approach to musical setting and character development.

Lecture/Seminar

Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America

Wednesday, November 2, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET

In-Person and Online Program: French sociologist Alexis de Tocqueville wrote Democracy in America, his seminal assessment of both the American experiment and the future of democracy after a visit to this country in 1831. Georgetown professor and political theorist Joseph Hartman considers the way in which Tocqueville thought through democracy and its problems and what Tocqueville means for us today.

Lecture/Seminar

The 1920s: Welcome to the New World

Wednesday, November 2, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

In-Person and Online Program: In the 1920s, a decade of economic prosperity and cultural dynamism, Americans were dancing faster, driving faster, and living faster. Lecturer Stef Woods explores the explosion of new directions the period brought, from the jazz craze to the writers of the Lost Generation to Prohibition. She also considers what comparisons might be drawn between that still-resonant era and today’s ’20s.

Course

Dances of the World With PBS’s Mickela Mallozzi

Wednesday, November 2, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

In a globe-trotting series, Mickela Mallozzi, the executive producer and host of the popular PBS series “Bare Feet with Mickela Mallozzi,” explores the history and evolution of dances from three distinctive regions and their role in linking communities and generations. This session showcases dances from the Caribbean.

Lecture/Seminar

From Streaming TV to the Oscars: How Netflix Disrupted the Entertainment Industry

Thursday, November 3, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

From its start as a DVD-by-mail rental service, Netflix has systematically changed the rules of the media business. Media expert Brian Rose explores how Netflix is primed to become the dominant source of leisure time entertainment throughout the world.

Course

Night and the Cities: Film Noir’s Suspense-Driven World

Thursday, November 3, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

A police detective down on his luck. A beautiful woman with a shady past. Dead bodies in dark corridors and dim light seeping through Venetian blinds. This is film noir: a world of chain-smoking deceivers, drifters, loners, con artists and killers—all double-dealing their way toward an uncertain and possibly fatal future. Film historian and author Max Alvarez examines the origins and achievements of the brilliant actors, directors, writers, and craftspeople behind this remarkably enduring genre.

Lecture/Seminar

Nude: The Unclothed Form in Western Art

Saturday, November 5, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

From depictions of divinities to ordinary people, idealized images to the unflinchingly realistic, Western artists have long turned to the nude human form as subject. Drawing on works from Michelangelo to Judy Chicago to Faith Ringgold, art historian Nancy G. Heller surveys the genre, including its power to provoke controversy, how female and male bodies are represented, and the enduring question, “What’s the difference between naked and nude?” (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar

A Native History of the American Revolution

Wednesday, November 9, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

The American Revolution was one in which Natives fought and died in great numbers and permanently reshaped the balance of power between Europeans and Native Americans on this continent. Historian Richard Bell surveys the Revolutionary War in Native America, with a focus on Molly Brant, an Iroquois woman who emerged as the long, bitter period’s most important military and cultural broker.

Course

Dances of the World With PBS’s Mickela Mallozzi

Wednesday, November 9, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

In a globe-trotting series, Mickela Mallozzi, the executive producer and host of the popular PBS series “Bare Feet with Mickela Mallozzi,” explores the history and evolution of dances from three distinctive regions and their role in linking communities and generations. This session showcases dances from the Silk Road.

Lecture/Seminar

The Search for Life Beyond Earth

Wednesday, November 16, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The race to remotely detect the first sign of alien life is gaining speed as technology starts to catch up to humanity’s imagination. Yet what evidence of “life”’ are we looking for? Louisa Preston of the Mullard Space Science Laboratory at University College London explores the question through the study of terrestrial biology and geology and considers predictions as to what extraterrestrial life might be like and how it might be found.

Lecture/Seminar

The Irrepressible Rosa Bonheur: The 19th Century’s Most Famous Woman Artist

Wednesday, November 16, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

An international celebrity during her lifetime, the reputation of prolific French animal painter Rosa Bonheur (1822–1899) faded  as the 20th century turned toward new art forms. In the 200th anniversary year of Bonheur’s birth, historian Nancy G. Heller celebrates her boldly unconventional personality and the achievements of a significant artistic career. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar

Gloriana: Elizabeth I and the Art of Queenship

Thursday, November 17, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Art and fashion were strategic propaganda devices that reinforced the magnificence—and power—of Elizabeth I as a virgin goddess. Lecturer Siobhan Clarke surveys the cult of Gloriana and the glittering jewels, opulent gowns, and royal portraits that shaped the image of England’s queen in her own time and throughout history. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar

Maria Sibylla Merian: A Biologist to the Bone

Thursday, November 17, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

The aesthetic appeal of the images created by Maria Sibylla Merian (German, 1647–1717) has led history to label her as an artist who painted and etched natural history subjects. Kay Etheridge, a professor emeritus of biology at Gettysburg College, draws on Merian’s own words and art to reveal she was as passionate a naturalist (biologist in modern terms) as Charles Darwin or Carl Linnaeus.

Lecture/Seminar

Spanish Wines: They Belong on Your Vinous Radar Now!

Friday, November 18, 2022 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Sommelier Erik Segelbaum guides you through a Spanish immersion as you sip like Don Quixote on the wines of Catilla-La Mancha, discover what makes Rioja so special, and be surprised and delighted with the diversity and deliciousness of Spanish wine.

Lecture/Seminar

Death and Beyond: Comparative Reflections on World Religious Traditions

Saturday, November 19, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Issues of death, dying, and the meaning of life—and the afterlife—hold key places in the belief systems of the major religious traditions of the world. Graham M. Schweig, a professor of philosophy and religions at Christopher Newport University and Graduate Theological Union, surveys differing visions of these themes from a variety of Eastern and Western cultural perspectives.

Lecture/Seminar

Europe 1900: The Golden Ages of Vienna, Paris, London

Saturday, December 3, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

The year 1900 found three of Europe’s greatest cities entering defining eras in their historical and cultural development. In a richly illustrated seminar, lecturer George Scheper explores how the alignment of creative forces shaped three highly distinctive urban milieus—each nourished by the energy and excitement of new ideas and each witnessing the birth of modernism in the coming century.

Lecture/Seminar

France’s Hidden Gems: Drink Like a French Sommelier

Friday, December 16, 2022 - 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET

Sommelier Erik Segelbaum guides you through a tour-de-force presentation of some of the most incredible yet lesser-known wines and regions of France. On this journey off the beaten path, you’re sure to discover some of the most exciting wines France produces.