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Smithsonian Associates - Entertaining, Informative, Eclectic, Insightful

World Art History Certificate: Elective Courses

Course
Thursday, October 28, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Join popular speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin for a fascinating exploration into the intimate relationship between the visible and invisible arts, and how music can literally bind the arts together in this fall series. This session focuses on The Artist as Musician, the Composer as Model. (World Art Certificate Program elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, October 30, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. ET

Civilizations have risen and fallen for centuries on the banks of the Mekong River. Long before there was Phnom Penh, Hanoi, or Vientiane, there were the settlements in the areas now known as Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, and Thailand. Art historian Robert DeCaroli investigates the cultures that emerged along this massive 2,700-mile-long river. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 1, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Whether created by artists such as Calder, Oldenburg, and Christo or generated from within communities, public art can powerfully speak to viewers through a wide variety of images, messages, materials, and settings. Art historian Janetta Rebold Benton surveys public art’s many forms, its creative roots and makers, and its social value. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, November 5, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Many iconic churches and palaces in Florence were constructed to represent wealth and power, but architect Filippo Brunelleschi’s Hospital of the Innocents was the first institution in the world to be dedicated to the well-being of children. Renaissance art historian Elaine Ruffolo explores its architecture and magnificent charitable history. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Sunday, November 7, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. ET

The notion that a picture is worth a thousand words is meant to convey the power of imagery. But what of the power of words—if they are Hemingway’s musings on a work of art, Van Gogh’s personal letters, or Michelangelo’s thoughts on his life and art expressed in his poetry? Explore the alchemy that occurs at the intersection of art and literature with David Gariff,  senior lecturer at the National Gallery of Art.  This session focuses on The Poetry of Michelangelo. (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, November 10, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

In 1932 Frank Lloyd Wright published The Disappearing City, a polemic about the evils of urban centers. He envisioned a better future centered on the automobile, telephone and radio, and mass production, integrated to bring mobility, freedom, and choice to the individual. In a richly illustrated program, Bill Keene examines the apparent contradictions between Wright’s essentially anti-city views and his ongoing fascination with work to enhance urban life. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, November 11, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

In the early years of the 20th century, Paris became a magnet for artists from all over the world and the birthplace for some of the principal innovations of modern art. Using high-definition Deep Zoom technology, Barnes Foundation educator Penny Hansen guides a live virtual tour that highlights works in the museum’s collection by Picasso, Matisse, Modigliani, and Soutine that bring this seminal period to life. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, November 13, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Understanding Italian architecture is understanding Western Civilization. No country has produced such an extraordinary number of iconic architectural monuments. Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in the Early Renaissance, traces the evolution of Italian architecture from its ancient Roman origins through the Middle Ages, and concludes with the breathtaking theatrics of Baroque architecture. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 15, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

The distinctive rock-cut architecture of Ajanta, Ellora, Elephanta, Badami, and other temple sites has captured the imaginations of India’s visitors and devotees for centuries. Art historian Robert DeCaroli examines what we know about their histories, how they were made, and what was required to maintain them in antiquity—as well as how they are being protected from threats today. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Art historian Bonita Billman examines how a group of painters created powerful and personal works that revealed unvarnished truths about urban life in the early 20th century. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, November 18, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The Lady with the Unicorn tapestries celebrate a world in which unicorns—no less than lions, bunny rabbits, or refined ladies—surely exist. Barbara Drake Boehm, curator emerita of the Met Cloisters, leads a virtual visit to the Cluny Museum to explore the exceptionally rich imagery, the history—real and imagined—and meaning behind these charming early 16th-century masterpieces. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, November 19, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Kevin Tervala, associate curator of African art at the Baltimore Museum of Art, explores the monumental and aesthetically innovative structures made from mud and earthen material built across the African continent—and how they communicated fundamental social, cultural, and religious beliefs. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, December 2, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Peter Carl Faberge is best known and remembered for the amazing imperial Easter eggs he created for the last Russian Tsar’s wife and mother. He and his firm also designed and produced jewelry and decorative pieces of unparalleled workmanship. Art critic and author Judy Pomeranz examines the life and times of Faberge, his extraordinary art, and his illustrious clients. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, December 3, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET

Post-impressionism was less a negative reaction to impressionism than a desire to improve upon it. Art historian Janetta Rebold Benton presents an intimate look at the background, life, and art of four post-impressionist luminaries. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, December 4, 2021 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The Arts and Crafts Movement was a dominant influence in visual and decorative arts and architecture in England and the United States around the turn of the last century. Art historian Bonita Billman explores the flowering and legacy of this movement. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Course
Sunday, December 5, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. ET

The notion that a picture is worth a thousand words is meant to convey the power of imagery. But what of the power of words—if they are Hemingway’s musings on a work of art, Van Gogh’s personal letters, or Michelangelo’s thoughts on his life and art expressed in his poetry? Explore the alchemy that occurs at the intersection of art and literature with David Gariff,  senior lecturer at the National Gallery of Art.  This session focuses on Ernest Hemingway, Joan Miró, and The Farm (1921-22). (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Sunday, December 5, 2021 - 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. ET

Taliesin, the Wisconsin home and studio of architect Frank Lloyd Wright, was witness to some of the greatest tragedies of his life, as well as some of his greatest triumphs. Join Taliesin historian Keiran Murphy as she tells the story of the iconic house and how it reflects decades of shifts in Wright's personal and professional life. (World Art Certificate Program elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, December 7, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

Duccio di Buoninsegna and Giotto di Bondone revolutionized the field of Italian painting in the 14th century. Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in the Early Renaissance, compares Duccio’s and Giotto’s art and examines the characteristics that defined their respective schools of painting. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, December 9, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Although the Barnes Foundation is widely known for its post-impressionist and early modern art, its extensive African collection has long been central to the museum’s educational mission. Using high-definition Deep Zoom technology, Barnes educator Penny Hansen guides a live virtual tour that surveys highlights of these distinctive holdings. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, December 13, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Virtually join art historian and culinary expert Elaine Trigiani in her 15th-century Tuscan farmhouse for a look at Venice through its artistic and culinary heritage. Learn how Giambattista Tiepolo became the 18th-century master of the Venetian school of painting. Then, watch her demonstrate the preparation of cicchetti, a favorite snack of today’s Venetian cocktail hour scene. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, December 16, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

Art historian Robert DeCaroli examines the sites and structures that made up the urban landscape of the Khmer Empire and traces the historical shifts, royal decisions, religious beliefs, and cultural processes that led to its development. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, January 7, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Rivalries can be dangerous and frustrating, but they can also fuel the creation of great works of art—as was the case among the Renaissance masters. Renaissance art historian Elaine Ruffolo brings into sharp focus the artistic rivalry among these painters and the often-overwhelming emotional and professional pressures that compelled them to create. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, January 13, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

The Barnes holds 59 of Henri Matisse’s works, including his fauvist masterpiece Le Bonheur de Vivre, and the The Dance, commissioned by collector Albert Barnes in 1930. The collection’s 46 works by Pablo Picasso range from The Peasants, which greets visitors in the main room, evolving to his Head of a Woman (Tête de femme). Barnes educator Penny Hansen uses high-definition Deep Zoom technology to explore the artists’ work and influence on 20th-century modernism. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, January 21, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The Tiber River flows around the famous hills of Rome. Nourishing Rome for centuries, for the ancient Romans the river personified a majestic old man, crowned with laurel and holding a cornucopia. Some of Rome’s greatest monuments are found along its banks. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo leads an art-historical adventure along the Tiber River. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Monday, January 24, 2022 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

This course examines fundamental concepts of composition and their practical application in studio-art practice, offering participants tools to enrich their own work as well to analyze and appreciate visual art in general. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, January 31, 2022 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Great art is timeless, and speaks to us across time, culture, and space. Yet great works come from real people living real lives. Paul Glenshaw examines Albert Bierstadt’s 1868 work Among the Sierra Nevada, California—a majestic depiction of the natural beauty of the American West that also served as part of a brazen self-marketing scheme, a lure to immigrants and settlers, and a reflection of the complex legacy of Manifest Destiny. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Wednesday, February 2, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET

Experiment with a variety of painting styles such as cubism, suprematism, and abstract expressionism to learn practical applications of the concepts and techniques of modernism. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, February 4, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

From the late Middle Ages to the early Renaissance, the Book of Hours, filled with groups of prayers designed for use by lay people, was more in demand than the Bible itself. Roger S. Wieck, Melvin R. Seiden curator and department head of Medieval and Renaissance manuscripts at the Morgan Library and Museum, explores the textual and pictorial riches to be found within the pages of these fascinating books. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, February 5, 2022 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

The English painters, poets, and critics who gave birth to the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in 1848 wanted to reform art by rejecting what they called the melodramatic style of High Renaissance artists like Raphael. Art historian Bonita Billman traces this fascinating movement from its origins to flowering conclusion. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, February 5, 2022 - 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. ET

Art historian and photographer Patricia Howard introduces the world of the photo surrealists and explores how they pushed the boundaries of photographic imagery in the 1920s to 1940s. Create your very own surrealist collage as part of the experience. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 10, 2022 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

The Barnes Foundation holds the world’s largest collection of works by Paul Cézanne, some 69 pieces including his masterworks The Large Bathers and The Card Players. Barnes educator Penny Hansen uses high-definition Deep Zoom technology to explore Cézanne’s career, his reclusive life, his style, his characteristic brushstrokes, and his deep influence on 20th-century art. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, February 10, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Thomas Eakins spent a lifetime on a quest to create the most accurate portrayal of the human figure. Art critic and author Judy Pomeranz examines the life of this exceptional American painter and his impact on the course of art history. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Studio Arts Course
Saturday, March 5, 2022 - 11:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET

Working from still-life arrangements reminiscent of Cézanne’s in studio sessions, students learn to achieve the brilliant and subtle effects characteristic of the medium. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, March 10, 2022 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

In mid-19th-century France, as political, social, and cultural changes swept through Europe, many painters rejected idealized classicism and romanticism, and began painting what they saw around them. The style became known as realism. Art historian Nancy G. Heller examines its evolution, significance, and later influence. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)