The Devil’s Diary: Recovering a Nazi Henchman’s Chilling Account of the Third Reich
Alfred Rosenberg’s diary provided a window into the center of Hitler’s ruling circle. Missing since the close of the Nuremberg trials, the volume came to light again in 2013, after a decade-long search across continents. Robert K. Wittman, who played a key role in its recovery, traces the trail that led to the diary and discusses the dark secrets in its pages.
Tuesday, August 2, 2016 - 6:45 PM
America’s First Ladies: Shaping a Role, Shaping History
It is Washington’s most visible and powerful unelected position—and possibly the most difficult. Andrew Och, a producer of C-Span’s 44-part series First Ladies: Influence and Image, reveals how some notable women navigated the prestige and the pitfalls that come with the role of presidential wife.
Wednesday, August 10, 2016 - 6:45 PM
Treasures from Turquoise Mountain
Spend a fascinating evening immersed in the Turquoise Mountain: Artists Transforming Afghanistan exhibition, including its spectacular contemporary carpets, jewelry, and calligraphy. Try your hand at the art forms in the exhibit, and mingle in a light reception provided by Tortoise and Hare.
Thursday, August 11, 2016 - 6:30 PM
Gelato and Sorbetto: A Cool History
Join food historian Francine Segan as she digs into some delicious gelato, starting with the fascinating history of Italian ices and sorbets, and ending with a taste of some of the scrumptious frozen desserts that made even Alexander the Great's mouth water.
Wednesday, August 17, 2016 - 6:45 PM
Inside the Homes and Studios of Glass Artists
All-Day Members-Only Tour
Members-Only Tour: The Washington area boasts a wide variety of glass artists working in an equally wide range of styles and techniques. Spend a fascinating day visiting five noted artists in studio and home settings to see them at work and explore their creations. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)
Sunday, August 21, 2016 - 8:45 AM
Harry Potter and the Wizarding Gene: Scientific Fact and Fantasy Fiction
In a muddle understanding how Muggles can have wizards on their family tree? Using principles of genetics and genomics, Eric Spana of Duke University’s biology department casts a scientific eye on of the world of J.K. Rowling's beloved Harry Potter books to explain how their characters come by their magical abilities.
Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 6:45 PM
Ben-Hur: The Original Blockbuster
Gen. Lew Wallace's 1880 novel Ben-Hur became a veritable commercial brand name that generated tens of millions of dollars. Learn about the unprecedented appeal of the story, and then get ready to watch Charlton Heston take the reins in the chariot race to end all chariot races in the 1959 film screened in AFI Silver’s beautifully restored art deco theater in Silver Spring.
Saturday, August 27, 2016 - 1:00 PM
Mallows Bay by Kayak: Ghost Ships and Bald Eagles
Morning Tour
Mallows Bay on the lower Potomac is the site of a “ghost fleet” of nearly 200 wrecked vessels dating from the Revolutionary War through World War I. There’s no better vantage point than a two-person kayak from which to experience this dramatic collection, as well as to explore the bay’s marshy tributaries filled with abundant wildlife.
Saturday, September 3, 2016 - 9:00 AM
Mallows Bay by Kayak: Ghost Ships and Bald Eagles
Afternoon Tour
Mallows Bay on the lower Potomac is the site of a “ghost fleet” of nearly 200 wrecked vessels dating from the Revolutionary War through World War I. There’s no better vantage point than a two-person kayak from which to experience this dramatic collection, as well as to explore the bay’s marshy tributaries filled with abundant wildlife.
Saturday, September 3, 2016 - 1:00 PM
The Pulse on Modern Medicine: Insights from NIH Experts
In a five-part series, listen to National Institutes of Health directors and scientific and medical experts discuss what is currently “hot” in biomedical research—and what it all means for our health and medical treatment today and in the future. This session features Eric Green, Director, National Human Genome Research Institute.
Tuesday, September 6, 2016 - 6:45 PM
Ready To Be a Rock Star?: Join the Smithsonian Rock ’n’ Roll Chorus
Is soundtrack to your life filled with the music of the Beatles, Beach Boys, and other classic rock groups? Bring those songs alive again in this ensemble led by conductor Cheryl Branham.
Tuesday, September 6, 2016 - 6:45 PM
Storytelling on the Screen: The Elements of Cinematic Style
We know the stories that unfold on film can move, thrill, and transport us. How do directors orchestrate the complex mix of words, sounds, and images to tell them? In this 4-session courseJack Jorgens, professor emeritus in the department of literature at American University, analyzes scenes from some of the screen’s best works to define how cinematic expression works. This session analyzes films such as Amadeus and The Imitation Game.
Wednesday, September 7, 2016 - 12:00 PM
Travel Among the Stars … Shall We?: The Feasibility of Space Travel
4-Session Evening Course
Is it truly possible to travel to Mars? In the past 25 years, we have detected thousands of confirmed planets, including many that are potentially habitable for humans. But will we be able to get to these distant destinations in space? Sten Odenwald, a NASA astronomer, looks into the feasibility of space travel and what is needed to be ready for such an undertaking.
Wednesday, September 7, 2016 - 6:45 PM
Sing Out! The Smithsonian Chorale
Spend Thursdays in song and in good company as singers meet for weekly rehearsals. Led by conductor Cheryl Branham, the sessions culminate in a concert performance.
Thursday, September 8, 2016 - 10:30 AM
Rum: From Cane to Cask
Americans have been raising toasts with rum since before there officially was an America. Now rum is the latest drink to be caught in the craft-beverage boom. Get an overview of the spirit’s history in American, and try samples of rum-based cocktails, in an evening hosted by Reed Walker and Jordan Cotton, the duo behind Washington’s first rum distillery, Cotton & Reed.
Thursday, September 8, 2016 - 6:45 PM
From Swamp to Swank: A Walk Through Washington’s Gilded Age
Morning Tour
A guided walk through the Dupont Circle neighborhood provides glimpses of Washington’s social and architectural emergence from the post-Civil War years into the  Gilded Age. Pass grand homes and visit other residences of the era including Heurich House and Anderson House.
Friday, September 9, 2016 - 10:00 AM
Literary Baltimore
All-Day Tour
Baltimore’s literary roots are deep ones. The authors who lived and worked here include Edgar Allan Poe, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Gertrude Stein. Led by arts journalist Richard Selden, discover Baltimore’s annual Mencken Day with a tour of sites connected to the city’s literary heritage.
Saturday, September 10, 2016 - 8:30 AM
Extravagant Elegance: The Gilded Age
Art historian Bonita Billman examines the opulent art, architecture, fashion, and interior design of the American upper crust between 1870 and 1910, and also explores the dramatic distance between their lives and those on the other end of the social and economic scales. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)
Saturday, September 10, 2016 - 9:30 AM
Roald Dahl: The Curmudgeon Who Built Charlie’s Chocolate Factory
On the anniversary of Dahl’s birth, explore the life and art of this storyteller with author Daniel Stashower. Actor Scott Sedar offers a dramatic reading of some of Dahl’s most memorable writings as we raise a toast in celebration and enjoy a special cake.
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 - 6:45 PM
From Swamp to Swank: A Walk Through Washington’s Gilded Age
Morning Tour
A guided walk through the Dupont Circle neighborhood provides glimpses of Washington’s social and architectural emergence from the post-Civil War years into the  Gilded Age. Pass grand homes and visit other residences of the era including Heurich House and Anderson House.
Wednesday, September 14, 2016 - 10:00 AM
Spies of the American Revolution: Famous to Infamous
4-Session Daytime Course
During the War of Independence, cunning spies, clever strategists, and treacherous turncoats used intelligence to literally shape the course of history. In a series presented in collaboration with the International Spy Museum, intelligence experts and historians explore individuals and incidents in which espionage played a critical part in the Revolution.
Wednesday, September 14, 2016 - 10:15 AM
The Supreme Court: A Preview of the New Term
Spend a morning getting a rare behind-the-scenes look at the Supreme Court—including the courtroom where cases are argued. Then, a panel of top legal experts previews the issues that will come before the court when the new session begins in October.
Thursday, September 15, 2016 - 10:00 AM
John Wilkes Booth: A Stage of Infamy
Jennifer Chiaverini discusses her new novel, Fates and Traitors: A Novel of John Wilkes Booth, in which she takes on one of American history’s most notorious villains, opening a conversation on who Booth really was, and why he assassinated one of America’s most beloved leaders.
Thursday, September 15, 2016 - 6:45 PM
The Many Cuisines of China
Skip the General Tsao’s Chicken. Cookbook author and illustrator Carolyn Phillips opens the door to the regional delights of Chinese dining that you’ve never known about when she offers an overview of the sweeping variety of cuisines within the country. Then shift from big to bite-sized as she shares tasty insights on dim sum’s traditions.
Thursday, September 15, 2016 - 6:45 PM
Breakfast at the Zoo: Going Bananas over the Great Apes!
For Smithsonian Associates members at the Resident Promoter ($100) level or below and Smithsonian staff: Join us as we feature the National Zoo’s primates—gorillas, orangutans, and gibbons—at this much-anticipated annual event. Enter the zoo before it opens to the public, enjoy a breakfast buffet, get up-close looks at the animals, and take in the memorable sights and sounds of Smithsonian’s wonderful zoo.  
Saturday, September 17, 2016 - 8:00 AM
Breakfast at the Zoo: Going Bananas over the Great Apes!
For Smithsonian Associates members at the Resident Advocate ($175) level or above. Join us as we feature the National Zoo’s primates—gorillas, orangutans, and gibbons—at this much-anticipated annual event. Enter the zoo before it opens to the public, enjoy a breakfast buffet, get up-close looks at the animals, and take in the memorable sights and sounds of Smithsonian’s wonderful zoo. This ticket option includes VIP Pavilion access from 8 to 9 a.m.
Saturday, September 17, 2016 - 8:00 AM
Breakfast at the Zoo: Going Bananas over the Great Apes!
For Smithsonian Associates members at the Resident Advocate ($175) level or above. Join us as we feature the National Zoo’s primates—gorillas, orangutans, and gibbons—at this much-anticipated annual event. Enter the zoo before it opens to the public, enjoy a breakfast buffet, get up-close looks at the animals, and take in the memorable sights and sounds of Smithsonian’s wonderful zoo. This ticket option includes VIP Pavilion access from 9 to 10 a.m.
Saturday, September 17, 2016 - 9:00 AM
Mallows Bay by Kayak: Ghost Ships and Bald Eagles
Morning Tour
Mallows Bay on the lower Potomac is the site of a “ghost fleet” of nearly 200 wrecked vessels dating from the Revolutionary War through World War I. There’s no better vantage point than a two-person kayak from which to experience this dramatic collection, as well as to explore the bay’s marshy tributaries filled with abundant wildlife.
Saturday, September 17, 2016 - 9:00 AM
Cultural Heritage Sites of China
From the grand splendor of the Forbidden City and the Summer Palace to the serene beauty of the gardens of Suzhou and the grand tombs of Ming and Qing dynasty rulers, spend a day with art historian Robert DeCaroli as he introduces spectacular places in China that are UNESCO World Heritage Sites. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)
Saturday, September 17, 2016 - 9:30 AM
The Harlem Renaissance: From New York to Washington, D.C.
Historian and scholar Michele L. Simms-Burton, a former professor of African-American studies at Howard University, leads a day that examines the creators and the works that came alive during one of the most creative and intellectually productive eras in African American history, the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s.
Saturday, September 17, 2016 - 10:00 AM
Breakfast at the Zoo: Going Bananas over the Great Apes!
For Smithsonian Associates members at the Resident Advocate ($175) level or above. Join us as we feature the National Zoo’s primates—gorillas, orangutans, and gibbons—at this much-anticipated annual event. Enter the zoo before it opens to the public, enjoy a breakfast buffet, get up-close looks at the animals, and take in the memorable sights and sounds of Smithsonian’s wonderful zoo. This ticket option includes VIP Pavilion access from 10 to 11 a.m.
Saturday, September 17, 2016 - 10:00 AM
Mallows Bay by Kayak: Ghost Ships and Bald Eagles
Afternoon Tour
Mallows Bay on the lower Potomac is the site of a “ghost fleet” of nearly 200 wrecked vessels dating from the Revolutionary War through World War I. There’s no better vantage point than a two-person kayak from which to experience this dramatic collection, as well as to explore the bay’s marshy tributaries filled with abundant wildlife.
Saturday, September 17, 2016 - 1:00 PM
Abstraction Takes Shape: 3D Printing and Math
Spend an afternoon watching and learning as mathematician and 3D designer Laura Taalman gives a 3D-printing demonstration and explains the process of transforming abstract geometrical ideas into beautiful objects.
Sunday, September 18, 2016 - 1:00 PM
Mid-Atlantic Cuisine on the Rise
From Chesapeake crab cakes to shoo-fly pie, Mid-Atlantic cuisine is now in the midst of rediscovery and revival. Chefs Jeremiah Langhorne and Spike Gjerde join Washington Post food and dining editor Joe Yonan to discuss the region’s culinary history and why it’s seeing a boost in popularity. They also talk about the trends that might be ahead on the regional dining horizon.
Monday, September 19, 2016 - 6:45 PM
Storytelling on the Screen: The Elements of Cinematic Style
We know the stories that unfold on film can move, thrill, and transport us. How do directors orchestrate the complex mix of words, sounds, and images to tell them? In this 4-session courseJack Jorgens, professor emeritus in the department of literature at American University, analyzes scenes from some of the screen’s best works to define how cinematic expression works. This session analyzes films and shows such as Downton Abbey and Citizen Kane.
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 - 12:00 PM
Alessandro de’ Medici, the Black Prince of Florence
Drawing on her new book, The Black Prince of Florence: The Spectacular Life and Treacherous World of Alessandro de’ Medici, historian Catherine Fletcher presents the story of a man and a family that is a never-ending source of fascination.
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 - 6:45 PM
The Color of Beer
A Smithsonian Libraries exhibition at the Natural History Museum invites visitors to look at color in a new light. What you may not realize is that color is an important part of evaluating beer. In this special evening, beer expert Neil Witte leads a tasting that examines beer through the lens of color and what it signals about a beer’s flavor and how it was made.
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 - 6:45 PM
A Postal Salute to National Parks: Ethel Kessler on Designing Commemorative Stamps
The centennial year of the National Park Service is being marked by the U.S. Postal Service with the release of a pane of Forever stamps that celebrate 16 national parks, created by award-winning stamp designer Ethel Kessler. She talks about the commemorative collections and how they represent the regional diversity of the National Park System.
Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 6:45 PM
Murals, Morals, and Krazy Kat: How Gilded-Age Artists Told America’s Story
Art historian Theodore Barrow examines the work of various muralists who played a key role in interpreting and magnifying stories and themes of American history in the Gilded Age. He also discusses artists like Winsor McCay and George Herriman, whose work reflected an entertaining and populist version of America’s story at that time. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)
Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 6:45 PM
Mary Roach: The Curious Science of Humans at War
Can diarrhea be a threat to national security? Why are zippers a fashion problem for snipers? Author Mary Roach, whose books deftly combine popular science and humor, learned the answers to these—and plenty of other intriguing questions—as she researched and wrote her newest book, Grunt.
Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 6:45 PM
From Swamp to Swank: A Walk Through Washington’s Gilded Age
Morning Tour
A guided walk through the Dupont Circle neighborhood provides glimpses of Washington’s social and architectural emergence from the post-Civil War years into the  Gilded Age. Pass grand homes and visit other residences of the era including Heurich House and Anderson House.
Saturday, September 24, 2016 - 9:00 AM
The Imperial Splendor of Ottoman Arts
Art historian Lawrence Butler introduces major figures, styles, and monuments of the Ottoman Empire, which dominated the eastern Mediterranean for 600 years, dazzling and terrifying the nations in its wake, and creating one of the most brilliant traditions of Islamic art under imperial patronage. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)
Saturday, September 24, 2016 - 9:30 AM
Self-Publishing: A Practical Guide for Writers
In a practical and informative program, writer and self-published author Monica Bhide covers the basics of self-publishing, following the process from completed manuscript to published work. Important tips are also shared by a panel of authors who have successfully self-published, as well as founders of local publishing houses.
Saturday, September 24, 2016 - 10:00 AM
What is Your Attachment Style?: Building Better Relationships Through Science
According to psychiatrist and neuroscientist Amir Levine, each of us has one of three distinct attachment styles that describe our behavior in a relationship: anxious, secure, or avoidant. Find out what your own style is—and how to figure out the style of others. It can make a big difference in how we manage our close relationships.
Sunday, September 25, 2016 - 1:00 PM
Rembrandt: Close-up on a Master
The 17th-century Dutch painter and printmaker Rembrandt van Rijn is one of the great innovators in Western art. Using web-based, high-resolution images that provide a look at Rembrandt’s practice from an uncommonly close point of view, art historian Aneta Georgievska-Shine explores some of the most unique aspects of his artistic language. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)
Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 6:45 PM
Rock Creek Park: Washington’s True Wild Side
In a presentation that is a virtual journey through Rock Creek Park, local natural historian Melanie Choukas-Bradley talks about its history and shares her impressions of its natural wonders. Part of a Lecture & Bus Tour Combo.
Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 6:45 PM
The Change-Makers and Social Justice
Ideas that can change the world—and lives—all share the same source: a motivated person who dares to ask, “Why not?" Tonight’s program features individuals who used their platforms to highlight issues as diverse as xenophobia, bigotry, sexism, and other social issues which then allows further discussions on these topics.
Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 6:45 PM
Making the Most of Your Memory
Are you worried about your memory, or someone else’s? Understand more about how memory works and how you might optimize yours from Barry Gordon, a nationally recognized expert on memory and memory disorders. It is an evening you won’t forget.
Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 6:45 PM
A Rock Creek Park Tour
Daytime Bus Tour
Celebrate the 100th anniversary of our National Park System with a daylong guided visit to DC’s own contribution to that spectacular natural collection—Rock Creek Park—with local natural historian Melanie Choukas-Bradley. Part of a Lecture and Tour Combo.
Friday, September 30, 2016 - 9:30 AM
The Great Cathedrals and Basilicas of Italy
Join Eric Denker, senior lecturer at the National Gallery of Art, as he leads a lavishly illustrated daylong program that focuses on the churches of Venice, Rome, Siena, and Florence that represent some of Italy’s most exceptional repositories of ecclesiastical art. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)
Saturday, October 1, 2016 - 9:30 AM
The Enduring Magnificent Seven
The latest version of The Magnificent Seven, starring Chris Pratt and Denzel Washington, is set for a September release. It’s a remake of the 1960 film of the same name.  Find out why this timeless story has endured across the decades, various media, and languages and cultures.
Saturday, October 1, 2016 - 10:00 AM
Storytelling on the Screen: The Elements of Cinematic Style
We know the stories that unfold on film can move, thrill, and transport us. How do directors orchestrate the complex mix of words, sounds, and images to tell them? In this 4-session courseJack Jorgens, professor emeritus in the department of literature at American University, analyzes scenes from some of the screen’s best works to define how cinematic expression works. This session analyzes films such as Modern Times and Mr. Hulot's Holiday.
Wednesday, October 5, 2016 - 12:00 PM
Smithsonian Craft2Wear 10th Anniversary Preview Night
Get the first look at a curated collection of art to buy and wear. Professional modeling throughout the evening. Special drawing to win $100 to spend at the show. Evening includes meeting artists and savoring a delicious light buffet.
Thursday, October 6, 2016 - 5:30 PM
2016 Smithsonian Craft2Wear Show Daily Admission
Save $2 and avoid lines by ordering your Daily Admission tickets in advance online. Tickets are $15 at the door.
Friday, October 7, 2016 - 10:00 AM
Friends Night Out at the Smithsonian Craft2Wear Show
A special shopping experience for you and your friends. Meet the show's artists, sample signature drinks, and find your fabulous. Ticket includes October 7 show admission, one cocktail, light snacks, and more.
Friday, October 7, 2016 - 5:30 PM
The Pulse on Modern Medicine: Insights from NIH Experts
In a five-part series, listen to National Institutes of Health directors and scientific and medical experts discuss what is currently “hot” in biomedical research—and what it all means for our health and medical treatment today and in the future. This session features William Gahl, Clinical Director, National Human Genome Research Institute and Director, NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program.
Thursday, October 13, 2016 - 6:45 PM
Storytelling on the Screen: The Elements of Cinematic Style
We know the stories that unfold on film can move, thrill, and transport us. How do directors orchestrate the complex mix of words, sounds, and images to tell them? In this 4-session courseJack Jorgens, professor emeritus in the department of literature at American University, analyzes scenes from some of the screen’s best works to define how cinematic expression works. This session analyzes films such as Throne of Blood and Macbeth.
Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 12:00 PM
Railways and History in Altoona and Johnstown
Overnight Tour
Rail historian Joe Nevin leads an overnight tour that explores two key aspects of Central Pennsylvania’s past: its railroading heritage and one of the country’s most tragic natural disasters—the Johnstown flood of 1889—and the role of the railroads in spreading the warning and saving lives.
Saturday, October 22, 2016 - 7:00 AM
Rob Kapilow’s What Makes It Great?
Masterworks by Harold Arlen, Britten, Dvorak, and Schubert get the distinctive in-depth examination from composer, conductor, and commentator Rob Kapilow in the new season. Presented in partnership with Washington Performing Arts. This performance features pieces by Harold Arlen.
Sunday, October 30, 2016 - 6:00 PM
Jewelers of the Gilded Age: Tiffany and Cartier
Fine-jewelry designers such as Louis Comfort Tiffany and Louis-Francois Cartier rose to prominence by creating extravagant and elegant baubles for the moneyed denizens of the Gilded Age—and the generations that followed. Art historian Stefanie Walker provides a guide to their glittering legacies. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)
Monday, November 7, 2016 - 6:45 PM
George Washington’s Revolutionary War
Overnight Tour
Join historians Ed Bearss and Gregg Clemmer as they lead an exciting overnight tour that follows the paths that brought George Washington and his army to some of the most critical locations of the Revolutionary War in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware.
Saturday, November 12, 2016 - 7:00 AM
The Pulse on Modern Medicine: Insights from NIH Experts
In a five-part series, listen to National Institutes of Health directors and scientific and medical experts discuss what is currently “hot” in biomedical research—and what it all means for our health and medical treatment today and in the future. This session features Anthony Fauci, Director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
Thursday, November 17, 2016 - 6:45 PM
Rob Kapilow’s What Makes It Great?
Masterworks by Harold Arlen, Britten, Dvorak, and Schubert get the distinctive in-depth examination from composer, conductor, and commentator Rob Kapilow in the new season. Presented in partnership with Washington Performing Arts. This performance features a masterwork by Britten.
Sunday, November 20, 2016 - 6:00 PM
The Pulse on Modern Medicine: Insights from NIH Experts
In a five-part series, listen to National Institutes of Health directors and scientific and medical experts discuss what is currently “hot” in biomedical research—and what it all means for our health and medical treatment today and in the future. This session features Julie Segre, Head, Microbial Genomics Section and Chief, Translational and Functional Genomics Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute.
Thursday, December 8, 2016 - 6:45 PM
The Pulse on Modern Medicine: Insights from NIH Experts
In a five-part series, listen to National Institutes of Health directors and scientific and medical experts discuss what is currently “hot” in biomedical research—and what it all means for our health and medical treatment today and in the future. This session features Gary Gibbons, Director, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.
Tuesday, January 24, 2017 - 6:45 PM
Rob Kapilow’s What Makes It Great?
Masterworks by Harold Arlen, Britten, Dvorak, and Schubert get the distinctive in-depth examination from composer, conductor, and commentator Rob Kapilow in the new season. Presented in partnership with Washington Performing Arts. This performance features a masterwork by Dvorak.
Sunday, January 29, 2017 - 6:00 PM
Rob Kapilow’s What Makes It Great?
Masterworks by Harold Arlen, Britten, Dvorak, and Schubert get the distinctive in-depth examination from composer, conductor, and commentator Rob Kapilow in the new season. Presented in partnership with Washington Performing Arts. This performance features a masterwork by Schubert.
Sunday, April 9, 2017 - 6:00 PM