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Smithsonian Associates - Entertaining, Informative, Eclectic, Insightful

Art & Architecture

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, August 6, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The golden period of the Serenissima Republic is reflected in the glorious art generated for its churches, confraternities, and palaces, including works by Bellini, Tintoretto, Tiepolo, and other masters. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo traces the history of this fabled city and the art and architecture created there. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Monday, August 9, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

From colossal Olmec heads to the paintings of Frida Kahlo, Aztec temples to Mexican murals, this survey of Latin American art sweeps through the centuries. Join art historian Michele Greet, who traces the significant creators and trends that defined and shaped the arts of Latin America from their earliest expressions through the 19th and 20th centuries. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Course
Tuesday, August 10, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Paul Glenshaw reprises four of his most popular programs from his daytime series Art + History, in which he examines great works of art in their historical context. As he explores seminal works by John Singleton Copley, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Edouard Manet, and Auguste Rodin he brings the world of the art and its creator to vivid life. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit) This session focuses on The Shaw Memorial by Augustus Saint Gaudens.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, August 11, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Over more than a century, three generations of Wyeths have created a collective portrait of America. Art historian Bonita Billman traces the family tradition reflected in their disparate subjects and styles. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Monday, August 16, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Curator Elizabeth Lay is joined by the daughter of the owner of Mae's Millinary shop known for its stunning "showstopper" hats, Donna Limerick, who discusses her mother’s entrepreneurial spirit, her memories of working in the shop, and shares cherished family photographs of “showstopper” hat images to view and enjoy.  She also talks about her experience working with the curators at NMAAHC to create the exhibition dedicated to her mother and her shop. Part of a 3-session Decorative Arts summer series.

Course
Tuesday, August 24, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Paul Glenshaw reprises four of his most popular programs from his daytime series Art + History, in which he examines great works of art in their historical context. As he explores seminal works by John Singleton Copley, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Edouard Manet, and Auguste Rodin he brings the world of the art and its creator to vivid life. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit) This session focuses on The Railway by Edouard Manet.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, August 25, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

Today’s advanced digital technologies can provide insights into artworks, offering researchers and curators new perspectives on their elements, creation, and history.  Michael B. Toth, ‎president of R. B. Toth Associates, discusses high-tech imaging projects that revealed previously hidden aspects of artworks dating from the Renaissance to today—and the surprises encountered during investigations into a Rubens painting.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, August 27, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in the Early Renaissance, examines the style, iconography, and history of The Last Judgment and the influence that it had on later artists. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, August 28, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET

Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in the Early Renaissance, examines one of the most productive, yet frustrating periods of Michelangelo’s artistic career—fulfilling his commissions from the Medici popes. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Course
Tuesday, August 31, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Paul Glenshaw reprises four of his most popular programs from his daytime series Art + History, in which he examines great works of art in their historical context. As he explores seminal works by John Singleton Copley, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Edouard Manet, and Auguste Rodin he brings the world of the art and its creator to vivid life. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit) This session focuses on The Burghers of Calais by Auguste Rodin.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, September 7, 2021 - 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

In 1932 Frank Lloyd Wright published The Disappearing City, a polemic about the evils of urban centers. He envisioned a better future centered on the automobile, telephone and radio, and mass production, integrated to bring mobility, freedom, and choice to the individual. In a richly illustrated program, Bill Keene examines the apparent contradictions between Wright’s essentially anti-city views and his ongoing fascination with work to enhance urban life. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, September 8, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Twentieth-century American artist Jacob Lawrence’s depictions of Black life memorialized many significant events and figures of African American history. The emphasis on narrative in his work has deflected from a consideration of the artist’s deep engagement with form. Art historian Jordana Moore Saggese examines the career of Lawrence in terms of his formal innovations, repositioning this work within the avant-garde.  (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, September 9, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The National Archaeology Museum in Naples is one of the most spectacular showcases of antiquities in the world, with treasures from Pompeii, Herculaneum, and their sister towns and villas. Join art historian and tour guide Laura R. Weinstein live from Rome as she highlights some of the most fascinating collections of this visit-worthy cultural gem in Naples. (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, September 10, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Florence’s imposing Pitti Palace was chosen by Cosimo I de’ Medici and his wife Eleanor of Toledo as the grand ducal residence in 1549 and it soon became the new symbol of the Medicis’ power over Tuscany. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo leads a virtual visit to the Pitti Palace, where she highlights a selection of painting masterpieces, discusses the extraordinary objets d'art, and leads a stroll through the Boboli Gardens. (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, September 14, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Over the centuries, Notre Dame Cathedral has survived myriad threats to its survival, emerging as a resilient yet vulnerable symbol of the historical and cultural legacy of Paris and all of France. Art historian Judy Scott Feldman surveys the cathedral’s history and the ongoing restoration and historic preservation efforts to return the cathedral to its condition before the devastating April 2019 blaze. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, September 17, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

The Barnes is often considered the greatest post-impressionist and early-modern art collection in the world. Join Barnes Foundation educator Penny Hansen as she covers its history and uses unique high-definition Deep Zoom technology to offer closeup looks masterpiece that reveal their surfaces and details in ways that bring the art and the artists to vivid life. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Monday, September 20, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Art historian Nancy G. Heller focuses on a quartet of Spain’s most significant painters—unearthing their sources, analyzing their principal works, discussing the critical receptions of their pictures, and demonstrating their influences on later generations of visual artists, both within and beyond the borders of Spain. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, September 24, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

With the Ducal Palace providing the splendid backdrop, Urbino’s became the ideal princely court among the most illustrious of Europe, providing patronage to such artists as Raphael and Titian. Return to the 15th century with art historian Elaine Ruffolo to experience a Renaissance court in all its glory. (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1/2 credit)

Course
Monday, September 27, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay and her expert guests for an image-rich lunchtime lecture series focusing on fascinating decorative arts and design topics. This session explores what our collections tell us about our time, our values, and ourselves. Part of a 3-session Decorative Arts fall series.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, September 28, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Frank Lloyd Wright’s residence for Buffalo businessman Darwin D. Martin is one of the most substantial and highly developed of his Prairie-style houses and among the architect’s most significant early commissions. Mary Roberts, executive director of the Martin House, leads a live virtual tour through sections of the main house, the open-air pergola, and conservatory as she shares the fascinating history of the site.

Course
Sunday, October 3, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. ET

The notion that a picture is worth a thousand words is meant to convey the power of imagery. But what of the power of words—if they are Hemingway’s musings on a work of art, Van Gogh’s personal letters, or Michelangelo’s thoughts on his life and art expressed in his poetry? Explore the alchemy that occurs at the intersection of art and literature with David Gariff,  senior lecturer at the National Gallery of Art.  This session focuses on Van Gogh: Artist and Writer. (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit)

Course
Monday, October 4, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay and her expert guests for an image-rich lunchtime lecture series focusing on fascinating decorative arts and design topics. This session explores how to spot the originals and the knockoffs among classic mid-century modern furniture pieces. Part of a 3-session Decorative Arts fall series.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, October 6, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The official and personal residences of Queen Elizabeth II scattered through the United Kingdom are magnificent living palaces, estates, and castles that are used daily to serve the needs of the royal family. Join monarchy expert Andrew Lannerd to explore the vibrant history of each of these famed residences in detail, including behind-the-scenes accounts of events such as a royal wedding at Windsor Castle and a private party that celebrated the queen’s 80th birthday.

Course
Thursday, October 7, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Join popular speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin for a fascinating exploration into the intimate relationship between the visible and invisible arts, and how music can literally bind the arts together in this fall series. This session focuses on Marc Chagall and opera. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, October 8, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Ambitious, extravagant, progressive, and oftentimes sexually notorious, the Sforza family took over the ducal throne of Milan in 1450, ushering in a period of unprecedented peace and prosperity. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo reveals how Milan and its rulers exemplified the political, cultural, religious, and economic aspirations of Renaissance Italy. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Wednesday, October 13, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

The radical innovations made by European and American painters and sculptors between 1900 and 1960 forever altered the way we think about visual art. In a richly illustrated course, art historian Nancy G. Heller discusses major works by the period’s seminal painters and sculptors, emphasizing their broader socio-political and aesthetic contexts. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Thursday, October 14, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Albert Barnes amassed 181 works by Pierre-August Renoir—the world’s largest collection. Barnes Foundation educator Penny Hansen uses high-definition Deep Zoom technology to offer remarkable close-up views of his paintings as she examines his stylistic changes over the years, and discusses Barnes’ great affinity for Renoir, especially his late works. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Thursday, October 14, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Join popular speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin for a fascinating exploration into the intimate relationship between the visible and invisible arts, and how music can literally bind the arts together in this fall series. This session focuses on symbols and allegories. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Saturday, October 16, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. ET

Dante’s epic poem has provided inspiration for countless artists—from manuscript illuminators to painters and sculptors from a variety of cultures and time periods. Art historian Aneta Georgievska Shine explores some of the greatest of those works by such artists as Botticelli, Blake, Redon, and Rodin. (World Art History Certificate elective,1 credit)

Course
Monday, October 18, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET

Join curator Elizabeth Lay and her expert guests for an image-rich lunchtime lecture series focusing on fascinating decorative arts and design topics. This session offers some valuable insider’s tips on navigating today’s changing auction world. Part of a 3-session Decorative Arts fall series.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, October 19, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Who gets commemorated in art and why? Drawing on her new book Twelve Caesars: Images of Power from the Ancient World to the Modern, noted classicist Mary Beard tells the story of how for more than two millennia portraits of the rich, powerful, and famous in the western world have been shaped by the image of Roman emperors, from the ruthless Julius Caesar to the fly-torturing Domitian. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, October 19, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

During the Renaissance, artists began to portray plants and animals with increased fidelity to nature, and natural philosophers began to replace myths with scientific explanations of the natural world. Kay Etheridge, a biology professor at Gettysburg College, traces how revolutionary changes in the ways animals and plants were visually portrayed led to a transformation in our understanding of the world around us.

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, October 19, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. ET

Great art is timeless, and speaks to us across time, culture and space. Yet great works come from real people living real lives. Paul Glenshaw looks at three iconic works by Jacques-Louis David that capture Napoleon and how the collaboration of artist and subject established an imperial image for the world. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Thursday, October 21, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Join popular speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin for a fascinating exploration into the intimate relationship between the visible and invisible arts, and how music can literally bind the arts together in this fall series. This session focuses on The Sharp Family. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, October 22, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

The greatest painter of the Venetian Renaissance, Titian, was also the first whose clientele was largely international. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo surveys how the golden age of the Serenissima Republic is reflected in the art Titian generated for its churches, confraternities, and palaces. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Thursday, October 28, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET

Join popular speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin for a fascinating exploration into the intimate relationship between the visible and invisible arts, and how music can literally bind the arts together in this fall series. This session focuses on The Artist as Musician, the Composer as Model. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 1, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. ET

Whether created by artists such as Calder, Oldenburg, and Christo or generated from within communities, public art can powerfully speak to viewers through a wide variety of images, messages, materials, and settings. Art historian Janetta Rebold Benton surveys public art’s many forms, its creative roots and makers, and its social value. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 2, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for three online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on Character: Discover Dimensions.

Lecture/Seminar
Friday, November 5, 2021 - 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. ET

Many iconic churches and palaces in Florence were constructed to represent wealth and power, but architect Filippo Brunelleschi’s Hospital of the Innocents was the first institution in the world to be dedicated to the well-being of children. Renaissance art historian Elaine Ruffolo explores its architecture and magnificent charitable history. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Sunday, November 7, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. ET

The notion that a picture is worth a thousand words is meant to convey the power of imagery. But what of the power of words—if they are Hemingway’s musings on a work of art, Van Gogh’s personal letters, or Michelangelo’s thoughts on his life and art expressed in his poetry? Explore the alchemy that occurs at the intersection of art and literature with David Gariff,  senior lecturer at the National Gallery of Art.  This session focuses on The Poetry of Michelangelo. (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 9, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for three online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on Setting: Explore Place and Time.

Lecture/Seminar
Monday, November 15, 2021 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. ET

The distinctive rock-cut architecture of Ajanta, Ellora, Elephanta, Badami, and other temple sites has captured the imaginations of India’s visitors and devotees for centuries. Art historian Robert DeCaroli examines what we know about their histories, how they were made, and what was required to maintain them in antiquity—as well as how they are being protected from threats today. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Lecture/Seminar
Tuesday, November 16, 2021 - 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Discover how visual art can inspire creative writing and how writing can offer a powerful way to experience art. Join Mary Hall Surface, founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for three online workshops that explore essential elements of writing and styles through close looking, word-sketching, and imaginative response to prompts. This session focuses on Story: Imagine Possibilities.

Lecture/Seminar
Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET

Art historian Bonita Billman examines how a group of painters created powerful and personal works that revealed unvarnished truths about urban life in the early 20th century. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Course
Sunday, December 5, 2021 - 3:00 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. ET

The notion that a picture is worth a thousand words is meant to convey the power of imagery. But what of the power of words—if they are Hemingway’s musings on a work of art, Van Gogh’s personal letters, or Michelangelo’s thoughts on his life and art expressed in his poetry? Explore the alchemy that occurs at the intersection of art and literature with David Gariff,  senior lecturer at the National Gallery of Art.  This session focuses on Ernest Hemingway, Joan Miró, and The Farm (1921-22). (World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit)