World History Programs
Mary, Queen of Scots: Villain or Victim?

On Feb. 8, 1587, Mary, Queen of Scots was executed for treason on the orders of her English cousin, Elizabeth I. It was a tragic end to a turbulent life. Historian Jennifer Paxton explores Mary’s life for an answer to one of history’s enduring questions: Was the queen a martyr or a failed conspirator? 

Date
Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Athens and the Roots of Democracy

Kelcy Sagstetter, assistant professor of history at the United States Naval Academy, explores the fascinating origins of Western democracy and their link to its current iterations.

Date
Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Amsterdam in the 17th Century: From Tulip Mania to the New World

Explore the many facets of Amsterdam, which in the 17th century transformed itself into a thriving center for great artists, scientists, writers, and scholars, as well as a hub of banking and finance and religious tolerance.

Date
Monday, September 18, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Moscow’s Haunted House of Government

In conversation with Peter Baker, White House correspondent for the New York Times and former Moscow bureau chief for the Washington Post, historian Yuri Slezkine discusses the lives of the Bolshevik true believers who lived in the House of Government, from their conversion to Communism to their children’s loss of political faith and the fall of the Soviet Union.

Date
Sunday, September 24, 2017 - 10:00 a.m.
Great Escapes: How Spies, Hostages, and Assets Survive and Get Out Alive
4-Session Daytime Course

Escape-room challenges are popular among fans of spy thrillers, but what if your life actually depended on the result? Be regaled by experts familiar with life-or-death operations conducted in such places as Iran and Moscow in this series exploring memorable escapes, rescues, and evasions from the 1970s through today.

Date
Wednesday, September 27 to October 18, 2017 – 10:15 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.
The Sputnik Years

When a Russian rocket lofted Sputnik 1 into orbit on October 4, 1957, the Space Age—and the Space Race—had begun. Explore the events leading up to Sputnik's launch, the political fallout that led to America's response (Explorer 1), the formation of NASA, and the role that everyday citizens played in tracking the first satellites.

Date
Wednesday, October 4, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Chinese Art: From the Bronze Age to the People’s Republic
4-Session Evening Course

Chinese civilization has given rise to some of the world’s most remarkable artistic creations. Art historian Robert DeCaroli examines how, across the centuries, China’s social, religious, and political life have influenced transformations in its material culture. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Date
Monday, October 16 to November 6, 2017 – 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m.
The Romanov Dynasty: Tracing the Path of Triumph and Downfall

After enduring for so long, what made the Romanov dynasty vulnerable to come tumbling down exactly a hundred years ago? Historian George Munro examines the policies of the rulers most responsible for the dynasty’s success in its first two centuries and explores the factors that brought about its ultimate tragic loss of power.

Date
Thursday, October 19, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Untangling the Legend of Lionheart

Was Lionheart a brave warrior and a hero of the tales of Robin Hood or a vicious killer and failed monarch? The truth about King Richard I is plucked from the tangle of legends in this entertaining program.   

Date
Thursday, October 19, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Portugal’s Golden Ages: An Artistic and Cultural Mosaic

Portugal’s famous voyages of exploration in the 15th century led to the creation of global maritime trading empires in Asia, Africa, and Brazil and fabulous wealth in the homeland. Art historian Lawrence Butler explores the art and architecture of Portugal and its dependencies during several of the country’s golden ages. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Date
Saturday, October 21, 2017 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
The Russia That Just Won’t Go Away: What Is This Eternal Survivor’s Secret?

What is it about Russia and Russians that has allowed them to survive seemingly insurmountable obstacles over the centuries? In a fascinating and informative daylong program, historian George E. Munro explores the nature of each of the crises that Russia has faced and considers how it was that state and society managed to hold together.

Date
Saturday, October 21, 2017 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
Art of the Medieval World: Cathedrals and Beyond
4-Session Daytime Course

Independent art historian Judy Scott Feldman examines the art and architecture of the 1,000-year period between classical antiquity and the Renaissance, and its relationship to a society infused with faith and spirituality. (Word Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Date
Wednesday, October 25 to November 15, 2017 – 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Jane Austen: From the Parlor to Politics

This year marks the 200th anniversary of the death of Jane Austen. The passing years have increased her novels’ appeal as Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy, the Dashwood sisters, and Emma Woodhouse and Mr. Knightley continue to delight us. Discover how Austen introduced the realities of Regency England into her carefully crafted worlds.

Date
Thursday, October 26, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Mummies and Their Mysteries: Kings to Crocodiles to Eva Peron

The practice of mummification dates back thousands of years. Egyptologist Bob Brier (also known as Mr. Mummy), discusses the history of mummies from ancient to modern times, and looks at the lighter side of the subject in popular entertainment and books.

Date
Saturday, October 28, 2017 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Traditional Roots of Modern China: How an Ancient World View Drives Contemporary Policies

In a timely daylong program, China scholar Robert Daly traces China’s 21st-century drive for wealth, power, and status to the beliefs, geographic influences, and social and cultural practices rooted in the earliest dynasties.

Date
Saturday, November 4, 2017 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
The Black Sea: Civilizations at the Crossroads of Europe and Asia

From antiquity to our own day, the Black Sea has been a crossroads of civilizations and is still a bridge between Europe and the Middle East and between the cultures of Eastern Orthodox Christianity and Islam. Spend a day drawn into its turbulent past and present.

Date
Saturday, November 4, 2017 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
The Norman Invasion: William’s Unlikely Conquest

The 1066 invasion and occupation of England led by Duke William II of Normandy changed the course of history. But the Norman Conquest never should have succeeded. Historian Jennifer Paxton sets the scene for this unlikely triumph for France, and how its after-effects echo through the centuries.

Date
Monday, November 13, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.