World History Programs
Great Escapes: How Spies, Hostages, and Assets Survive and Get Out Alive

Escape-room challenges are popular among fans of spy thrillers, but what if your life actually depended on the result? Be regaled by experts familiar with life-or-death operations conducted in such places as Iran and Moscow in this series exploring memorable escapes, rescues, and evasions from the 1970s through today. This session focuses on career counter-terrorism and intelligence officer Malcolm W. Nance. Part of 4-Session Daytime Course.

Date
Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 10:15 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.
The Romanov Dynasty: Tracing the Path of Triumph and Downfall

After enduring for so long, what made the Romanov dynasty vulnerable to come tumbling down exactly a hundred years ago? Historian George Munro examines the policies of the rulers most responsible for the dynasty’s success in its first two centuries and explores the factors that brought about its ultimate tragic loss of power.

Date
Thursday, October 19, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Untangling the Legend of Lionheart

Was Lionheart a brave warrior and a hero of the tales of Robin Hood or a vicious killer and failed monarch? The truth about King Richard I is plucked from the tangle of legends in this entertaining program.   

Date
Thursday, October 19, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Portugal’s Golden Ages: An Artistic and Cultural Mosaic

Portugal’s famous voyages of exploration in the 15th century led to the creation of global maritime trading empires in Asia, Africa, and Brazil and fabulous wealth in the homeland. Art historian Lawrence Butler explores the art and architecture of Portugal and its dependencies during several of the country’s golden ages. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Date
Saturday, October 21, 2017 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
The Russia That Just Won’t Go Away: What Is This Eternal Survivor’s Secret?

What is it about Russia and Russians that has allowed them to survive seemingly insurmountable obstacles over the centuries? In a fascinating and informative daylong program, historian George E. Munro explores the nature of each of the crises that Russia has faced and considers how it was that state and society managed to hold together.

Date
Saturday, October 21, 2017 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
Art of the Medieval World: Cathedrals and Beyond
4-Session Daytime Course

Art historian Judy Scott Feldman examines the art and architecture of the 1,000-year period between classical antiquity and the Renaissance, and its relationship to a society infused with faith and spirituality. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Date
Wednesday, October 25 to November 15, 2017 – 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Jane Austen: From the Parlor to Politics

This year marks the 200th anniversary of the death of Jane Austen. The passing years have increased her novels’ appeal as Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy, the Dashwood sisters, and Emma Woodhouse and Mr. Knightley continue to delight us. Discover how Austen introduced the realities of Regency England into her carefully crafted worlds.

Date
Thursday, October 26, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Mummies and Their Mysteries: Kings to Crocodiles to Eva Peron

The practice of mummification dates back thousands of years. Egyptologist Bob Brier (also known as Mr. Mummy), discusses the history of mummies from ancient to modern times.

Date
Saturday, October 28, 2017 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Traditional Roots of Modern China: How an Ancient World View Drives Contemporary Policies

In a timely daylong program, China scholar Robert Daly traces China’s 21st-century drive for wealth, power, and status to the beliefs, geographic influences, and social and cultural practices rooted in the earliest dynasties.

Date
Saturday, November 4, 2017 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
The Black Sea: Civilizations at the Crossroads of Europe and Asia

From antiquity to our own day, the Black Sea has been a crossroads of civilizations and is still a bridge between Europe and the Middle East and between the cultures of Eastern Orthodox Christianity and Islam. Spend a day drawn into its turbulent past and present.

Date
Saturday, November 4, 2017 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
The Fate of Rome: Nature’s Triumph Over Human Ambition

The centuries-long dissolution of the Roman Empire was shaped not just by emperors, soldiers, and barbarians but also by volcanic eruptions, solar cycles, climate instability, and devastating viruses and bacteria. Classicist Kyle Harper traces how a seemingly invincible empire fell victim to forces far stronger than its armies: those of the environment.

Date
Wednesday, November 8, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
The Norman Invasion: William’s Unlikely Conquest

The 1066 invasion and occupation of England led by Duke William II of Normandy changed the course of history. But the Norman Conquest never should have succeeded. Historian Jennifer Paxton sets the scene for this unlikely triumph for France, and how its after-effects echo through the centuries.

Date
Monday, November 13, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
The Lafayette Escadrille: Legends with a Cause

The brash young Americans who volunteered to fly with French fighter pilots during the early days of World War I became the nucleus of the legendary Lafayette Escadrille. Paul Glenshaw, an aviation expert and filmmaker, tells the story of the “founding fathers of American combat aviation” and offers preview clips from his documentary film about the Escadrille pilots.

Date
Tuesday, November 14, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
The Protestant Reformation

October 31, 2017—Reformation Day—marks the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation that began with Martin Luther’s 95 Theses. John M. Freymann, permanent military professor in history at the U.S. Naval Academy, reviews the emergence and development of the 16th-century reformations from the late Middle Ages into the early modern period.

Date
Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Hannibal's Oath: The Life and Wars of Rome's Greatest Enemy

According to ancient sources, Hannibal was 9 years old when his father dipped the boy's hand in blood and made him swear eternal hatred of Rome. Whether the story is true or not, it’s one of hundreds of legends that have appeared over the centuries about this enigmatic military genius who challenged Rome for mastery of the ancient world. Biographer John Prevas traces Hannibal’s rise, triumphs, downfall, and final exile.

Date
Wednesday, December 6, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Indiana Jones, The Eternal Explorer: The Politics of Archaeology, Empires, and Exploration

Using swashbuckling Indiana Jones as both a movie hero and an archetype, Justin M. Jacobs of American University leads a fascinating expedition into real-life and Hollywood-style history that examines the controversies and contexts of archaeology and exploration. This session focuses on "Who Was Indiana Jones?" Part of a 5-session lecture series.

Date
Thursday, December 7, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
The Olmec Culture: Monuments, Masterpieces, and Mysteries

More than 30,000 years ago, important centers of Olmec culture flourished along the Gulf of Mexico. George L. Scheper of Johns Hopkins University provides a cultural overview of these achievements, and examines the Olmecs’ relationship and influence on neighboring civilizations. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Date
Saturday, December 9, 2017 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
Early-Renaissance Florence and Siena: Dueling Artistic Traditions

Lisa Baumann, professor of art history at George Mason University, explores the stylistic differences among artists working in the city-states of Florence and Siena at the cusp of the Renaissance. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Date
Monday, December 11, 2017 - 6:45 p.m.
Indiana Jones, The Eternal Explorer: The Politics of Archaeology, Empires, and Exploration

Using swashbuckling Indiana Jones as both a movie hero and an archetype, Justin M. Jacobs of American University leads a fascinating expedition into real-life and Hollywood-style history that examines the controversies and contexts of archaeology and exploration. This session focuses on "Why Does That Belong in a Museum?" Part of a 5-session lecture series.

Date
Thursday, January 4, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
Indiana Jones, The Eternal Explorer: The Politics of Archaeology, Empires, and Exploration

Using swashbuckling Indiana Jones as both a movie hero and an archetype, Justin M. Jacobs of American University leads a fascinating expedition into real-life and Hollywood-style history that examines the controversies and contexts of archaeology and exploration. This session focuses on "Who Enabled Indiana Jones?" Part of a 5-session lecture series.

Date
Thursday, February 1, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
Indiana Jones, The Eternal Explorer: The Politics of Archaeology, Empires, and Exploration

Using swashbuckling Indiana Jones as both a movie hero and an archetype, Justin M. Jacobs of American University leads a fascinating expedition into real-life and Hollywood-style history that examines the controversies and contexts of archaeology and exploration. This session focuses on "Who Confronted Indiana Jones?" Part of a 5-session lecture series.

Date
Thursday, February 22, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
Indiana Jones, The Eternal Explorer: The Politics of Archaeology, Empires, and Exploration

Using swashbuckling Indiana Jones as both a movie hero and an archetype, Justin M. Jacobs of American University leads a fascinating expedition into real-life and Hollywood-style history that examines the controversies and contexts of archaeology and exploration. This session focuses on "Did Hollywood Get It Right?" Part of a 5-session lecture series.

Date
Thursday, March 22, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.