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Tuesday, May 24, 2016 at 7:00 PM

In 2015, Donna Karan surprised the fashion industry by stepping step down as head of her global brand to focus on philanthropic projects in health, education, and cultural preservation. Karan reveals to Robin Givhan, the Washington Post’s fashion critic, how she redesigned the concept of what success means both professionally and personally.

Sunday, June 12, 2016 at 10:00 AM

From summer refuge to Chautauqua center to amusement park to National Park site, Glen Echo’s identity has undergone plenty of shifts—but its charms have remained a constant. Join historian Jeanne Fogle for a walking tour to explore more than a century of change within one of Maryland’s smallest towns.

Sunday, June 12, 2016 at 12:30 PM

From summer refuge to Chautauqua center to amusement park to National Park site, Glen Echo’s identity has undergone plenty of shifts—but its charms have remained a constant. Join historian Jeanne Fogle for a walking tour to explore more than a century of change within one of Maryland’s smallest towns.

Saturday, June 25, 2016 at 7:00 PM

Members-Only Program: As a producer and writer, Norman Lear’s created shows whose characters and themes changed the face of American television. Join the four-time Emmy as he shares reflections on his life, career, and achievements from his groundbreaking sitcoms to his philanthropy.

Sunday, June 26, 2016 at 9:30 AM

Follow in the footsteps of the power-hungry politicos of the addictive Netflix series—the ones they take around Washington, that is. Join local historian Kathleen Bashian to cover some of the Washington locations against which the Underwoods’ scheming, affairs of state, and affairs of a different kind play out.

Tuesday, June 28, 2016 at 6:45 PM

Smithsonian research zoologist Christopher Meyer examines how the small world of biocubes—hollow frames used by researchers to sample a single cubic foot of an ecosystem—can reveal amazingly complex information about relationships among species.

Wednesday, June 29, 2016 at 8:45 AM

Spend an early-summer day on a private cruise aboard a 65-foot river craft, as environmental historian and storyteller Hayden Mathews examines the Potomac’s geological, natural, and ecological history, its lore, and its significance to the region as resource and symbol.

Thursday, July 7, 2016 at 6:00 PM

Spend a summer evening with local historian Garrett Peck and step into the heyday of Washington’s “Black Broadway,” when jazz filled the clubs and theaters of U Street and the nightlife scene rivaled Harlem’s.

Saturday, July 9, 2016 at 8:00 AM

Strategically located midway between the opposing capitals of Washington and Richmond, Fredericksburg saw a devastating battle early in the war, followed by three years of brutal activity in the surrounding countryside. Civil War historians Gregg Clemmer and Ed Bearss explore the city’s dramatic wartime history.

Saturday, July 9, 2016 at 9:30 AM

What happened to your great idea for a novel, memoir, or short story? Spend a day with author Kathryn Johnson of the Writer’s Center and begin to master the essential tools of the writing trade—and transform that idea into a reality.

Saturday, July 9, 2016 at 2:00 PM

It’s the most exclusive setting any Washington bride could ask for. Coleen Christian Burke, who writes on White House cultural history, takes a look at weddings of first family members that reflected a mix of the private, the public, and the political—as well as lots of romantic spectacle.

Tuesday, July 12, 2016 at 6:45 PM

Why was Qin Shi Huangdi sent into the afterlife accompanied by an army of thousands of terra-cotta troops? Historian Robert DeCaroli explores the achievements—and the downfall—of a ruler who profoundly shaped the visible expression of Chinese imperial power for centuries to come.

Wednesday, July 13, 2016 at 6:00 PM

Spend a summer evening with local historian Garrett Peck and step into the heyday of Washington’s “Black Broadway,” when jazz filled the clubs and theaters of U Street and the nightlife scene rivaled Harlem’s.

Wednesday, July 13, 2016 at 6:45 PM

Historian Richard Abels examines how the unlikely victory of Henry V and his “band of brothers” over massive numbers of French troops influenced the king’s image as a leader, his reign, and his place in British history.

Wednesday, July 13, 2016 at 6:45 PM

Purple carrots? A Mafia chokehold on the asparagus market? Food historian Joel Denker is ready to spill the beans (and plenty of other vegetables) as he recounts some fascinating and flavorful backstories of everyday foods and ingredients.

Thursday, July 14, 2016 at 6:45 PM

Virginia Shore, acting director and chief curator of the Art in Embassies program, discusses the how works are selected or commissioned and how using art in diplomacy can transcend national borders and foster international connections. (World Art Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Saturday, July 16, 2016 at 8:30 AM

Mallows Bay on the lower Potomac is the site of a “ghost fleet” of nearly 200 wrecked vessels dating from the Revolutionary War through World War I. There’s no better vantage point than a two-person kayak from which to experience this dramatic collection, as well as to explore the bay’s marshy tributaries filled with abundant wildlife.

Saturday, July 16, 2016 at 9:30 AM

We love them, yeah, yeah, yeah! Saul Lilienstein takes a joyful and serious look at the Beatles’ music, its roots and influences, and its relationship to the period of social change that provided a backdrop to their years at the top of the charts.

Saturday, July 16, 2016 at 9:30 AM

Archaeologist Robert Stieglitz chronicles how successive Greek migrations and conquests over the centuries—and their ensuing cultural, political, and intellectual interactions—transformed Asia Minor into an integral part of the Greek world.

Saturday, July 16, 2016 at 12:30 PM

Mallows Bay on the lower Potomac is the site of a “ghost fleet” of nearly 200 wrecked vessels dating from the Revolutionary War through World War I. There’s no better vantage point than a two-person kayak from which to experience this dramatic collection, as well as to explore the bay’s marshy tributaries filled with abundant wildlife.

Tuesday, July 19, 2016 at 6:45 PM

Is our desire to live germ-free fueling a global epidemic of chronic diseases? Are we destroying the very microorganisms we need to stay healthy? Immunotoxicologist Rodney Dietert, suggests that we start to think of ourselves as superorganisms—human ecosystems—and he outlines specific steps to take on the way back to a healthier world.

Wednesday, July 20, 2016 at 6:45 PM

Food historian Roger Horowitz traces how the complex and sometimes-contentious encounter between ancient religious principles and the 20th-century food industry brought kosher products into America’s supermarkets and dining rooms.

Thursday, July 21, 2016 at 6:00 PM

Spend a summer evening with local historian Garrett Peck and step into the heyday of Washington’s “Black Broadway,” when jazz filled the clubs and theaters of U Street and the nightlife scene rivaled Harlem’s.

Thursday, July 21, 2016 at 6:45 PM

Art historian Elaine Ruffolo examines how the art of Giotto set the stage for the flowering of Renaissance painting and why it continues to hold a deep and direct connection for viewers. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Thursday, July 21, 2016 at 6:45 PM

Biblical scholar Tod Linafelt explains why the enduring power of the Old Testament’s storytelling and poetry argues for its place not only in the synagogue or church but also among the classics of world literature.

Thursday, July 21, 2016 at 6:45 PM

Loren Schoenberg of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem draws on material from the Smithsonian’s Duke Ellington Collection to present an overview of the musical master’s richly varied career. Later, Schoenberg picks up his sax to join the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra Trio in a performance of some of Ellington’s best-loved works.

Saturday, July 23, 2016 at 9:30 AM

Art historian Elaine Ruffolo serves as guide for a journey through this beloved museum, covering its history, architecture, collections, and ties to both its Medici founders and the city of Florence. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Wednesday, July 27, 2016 at 6:45 PM

The enviably stylish power dressing on The Good Wife generates almost as much buzz among fans as the show’s storylines. The Emmy-nominated costume designer of the series reveals how he uses clothing to define character, and the real-life fashion lessons we can learn from the fictional but well-put-together staff of Lockhart/Gardner.

Saturday, July 30, 2016 at 8:30 AM

Mallows Bay on the lower Potomac is the site of a “ghost fleet” of nearly 200 wrecked vessels dating from the Revolutionary War through World War I. There’s no better vantage point than a two-person kayak from which to experience this dramatic collection, as well as to explore the bay’s marshy tributaries filled with abundant wildlife.

Saturday, July 30, 2016 at 9:00 AM

Complex and controversial, the towering figure of Clarence Darrow helped shape the legal landscape of early-20th-century America. Lawyer and author Jack Marshall examines his career and his legacy, and actor Paul Morella brings Darrow’s spell-binding courtroom oratory to life.

Saturday, July 30, 2016 at 12:30 PM

Mallows Bay on the lower Potomac is the site of a “ghost fleet” of nearly 200 wrecked vessels dating from the Revolutionary War through World War I. There’s no better vantage point than a two-person kayak from which to experience this dramatic collection, as well as to explore the bay’s marshy tributaries filled with abundant wildlife.

Tuesday, August 2, 2016 at 10:00 AM

Take a rare opportunity to hear first-person stories from men and women whose careers are spent in diplomatic Washington when you spend a day at the American Foreign Service Association and the U.S. Department of State.

Friday, September 23, 2016 at 8:00 AM

Explore the creative synergies between architecture and design as you spend two fascinating days in New York City and Connecticut in a tour led by architecture and urban studies specialist Bill Keene.

Saturday, October 1, 2016 at 7:00 AM

A partnership between the Smithsonian and Oak Ridge National Laboratory offers a rare chance to go behind the scenes at this center for cutting-edge energy science. This one-of-a-kind 4-day study tour brings you into the heart of Oak Ridge’s past and present, guided by the staff and the scientists who lead and conduct its research.

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