MA in the HISTORY of DECORATIVE ARTS REPLAY - Smithsonian Associates on C-SPAN Smithsonian NewsFlash Popular Culture Study Tours Smithsonian Jazz 
Masterworks Orchestra CivilWarStudies.org Photography Sign up for eAlerts today!
American History Programs

Subscribe to American History eAlerts and other topics on your My Account page.

Tuesday, February 16, 2016 at 6:45 PM

For all it lawlessness, war has been marked for centuries by gallantries, customs, and rites. But as the nature of war and how it is conducted evolves, how does the law of war apply to modern conflicts—including those that may be devoid of human combatants? Judge Evan J. Wallach examines the new legal standards that have been shaped in the post-9/11 world.

Wednesday, February 17, 2016 at 12:00 PM

A new lunchtime lecture series on Washington’s four quadrants kicks off with a focus on Southeast, one of the first areas of the federal city to develop thanks to the twin economic engines of the Capitol and the Navy Yard. Enjoy learning about several notable sites on both banks of the Anacostia. This lecture features the Frederick Douglass Home.

Wednesday, February 24, 2016 at 12:00 PM

A new lunchtime lecture series on Washington’s four quadrants kicks off with a focus on Southeast, one of the first areas of the federal city to develop thanks to the twin economic engines of the Capitol and the Navy Yard. Enjoy learning about several notable sites on both banks of the Anacostia. This lecture features the Navy Yard.

Wednesday, March 2, 2016 at 12:00 PM

A new lunchtime lecture series on Washington’s four quadrants kicks off with a focus on Southeast, one of the first areas of the federal city to develop thanks to the twin economic engines of the Capitol and the Navy Yard. Enjoy learning about several notable sites on both banks of the Anacostia. This lecture features the Congressional Cemetery.

Wednesday, March 9, 2016 at 12:00 PM

A new lunchtime lecture series on Washington’s four quadrants kicks off with a focus on Southeast, one of the first areas of the federal city to develop thanks to the twin economic engines of the Capitol and the Navy Yard. Enjoy learning about several notable sites on both banks of the Anacostia. This lecture features St. Elizabeths Hospital.

Tuesday, March 15, 2016 at 6:45 PM

Between them, illustrator Crockett Johnson (best known for Harold and the Purple Crayon), and writer Ruth Krauss were involved in some of the most beloved and influential children’s books of the 1950s and 60s. The couple’s involvement in leftist politics, though, garnered them a less appreciative audience: the FBI. Their biographer Philip Nel tells a fascinating tale of the intersection of art, publishing, and ideology during the Cold War.

Wednesday, March 16, 2016 at 6:45 PM

James Madison was among the framers of the Constitution who blocked the inclusion of a bill of rights in that historic document. Two years later, he became the chief proponent of the concept. On the anniversary of Madison’s 265th birthday, Constitutional scholar Linda R. Monk examines the story behind his greatest legislative achievement.

Thursday, March 17, 2016 at 6:45 PM

Beginning in the early 19th century through the 1930s, the Army Corps of Engineers was an essential force in shaping the urban landscape of Washington. Architectural historian Pamela Scott surveys the often-overlooked but significant work of these military engineers, whose projects—including the Washington Monument, Library of Congress, and Arlington Memorial Bridge—are part of the fabric of the city we know today.

Friday, March 18, 2016 at 8:30 AM

From the Capitol dome to the Smithsonian’s Arts and Industries Building, the work of architect and builder Montgomery Meigs is still part of our region’s landscape—and our daily lives. Spend a day focused on Washington history and architecture as you discover the many facets and achievements of the former Civil War officer who helped define and develop an enduring vision of the capital city.

Saturday, March 19, 2016 at 8:30 AM

Get an in-person look at several notable Washington, D.C. sites on both banks of the Anacostia in this local tour. Part of 5-Session Lecture Series with All-Day Tour.

Thursday, March 24, 2016 at 6:45 PM

The country shook off the Depression blues—at least for an hour or two—thanks to Fred, Ginger, Judy, and hundreds and hundreds of tap-happy chorus girls. American music specialist Robert Wyatt kicks off a new series with a joyful look at the movies that sang, danced, and beguiled us when we needed it most.

Thursday, March 24, 2016 at 6:45 PM

Though ultimately successful, D-Day was an almost-impossible political and logistical nightmare to conceive and execute. David Eisenhower examines the background of the daring cross-Channel invasion led by his grandfather, General Dwight D. Eisenhower.

Saturday, March 26, 2016 at 8:00 AM

Strategically located midway between the opposing capitals of Washington and Richmond, Fredericksburg saw a devastating battle early in the war, followed by three years of brutal activity in the surrounding countryside. Civil War historian Gregg Clemmer and special guest Ed Bearss explore the city’s dramatic wartime history.

Tuesday, March 29, 2016 at 6:45 PM

The Southern-created “Myth of the Lost Cause” has shadowed the historical remembrance of the Civil War, the country's watershed event. Historian Ed Bonekemper critically examines the accuracy of that myth and how it has affected perceptions of slavery, states' rights, and the nature of the conflict itself.

Saturday, April 2, 2016 at 10:00 AM

From the pre-Revolutionary era to the Civil War to the Great Depression and the postwar boom, Arlington County has always been a canvas for American history. Get a surprising look at the suburbs you think you know when you join historian Kathryn Holt Springston for a tour that uncovers the area’s rich heritage.

Monday, April 4, 2016 at 6:45 PM

The most famous song of the Civil War made her celebrated, but Julia Ward Howe also made her name as a pacifist, author, suffragist, world traveler, and a tireless campaigner for women’s rights and social reform. Her biographer Elaine Showalter joins NPR’s Cokie Roberts in a conversation about Howe’s remarkable self-creation that defied her era’s conventions of what a woman could be.

Wednesday, April 6, 2016 at 12:00 PM

The new lunchtime lecture series on Washington’s four quadrants continues with a focus on Northeast, an area with connections to the railroad and public markets, as well as education, social change, a president, and a neighborhood once known as Swampoodle. This lecture features Union Station.

Saturday, April 9, 2016 at 8:45 AM

Climb on board with historian Joseph Nevin for a steam train excursion through the Pennsylvania Dutch countryside and an afternoon at one of America's finest rail museums.

Tuesday, April 12, 2016 at 6:45 PM

Some of our favorite American cocktails date from the Civil War period and earlier. Sip your way through the era as cocktail historian Phillip Green looks at the popular drinks of the mid-19th century.

Wednesday, April 13, 2016 at 12:00 PM

The new lunchtime lecture series on Washington’s four quadrants continues with a focus on Northeast, an area with connections to the railroad and public markets, as well as education, social change, a president, and a neighborhood once known as Swampoodle. This lecture features Gallaudet University.

Saturday, April 16, 2016 at 8:00 AM

Join historian Gregg Clemmer as he explores and explains the most iconic battle of the Civil War in a full-day excursion.

Sunday, April 17, 2016 at 1:00 PM

D.C. was expected to be the “model dry city” during Prohibition. No way. There were about 3,000 speakeasies and even Congress employed its own bootleggers. Discover the quirky and little-known “monuments” to Prohibition on a walking tour in town.

Wednesday, April 20, 2016 at 12:00 PM

The new lunchtime lecture series on Washington’s four quadrants continues with a focus on Northeast, an area with connections to the railroad and public markets, as well as education, social change, a president, and a neighborhood once known as Swampoodle. This lecture features Union Market.

Wednesday, April 20, 2016 at 6:45 PM

Biographers Annette Gordon-Reed and Peter S. Onuf examine Thomas Jefferson’s vision of himself, the American Revolution, Christianity, slavery, and race through the lens of what they term his “empire of imagination.”

Saturday, April 23, 2016 at 1:00 PM

D.C. was expected to be the “model dry city” during Prohibition. No way. There were about 3,000 speakeasies and even Congress employed its own bootleggers. Discover the quirky and little-known “monuments” to Prohibition on a walking tour in town.

Wednesday, April 27, 2016 at 12:00 PM

The new lunchtime lecture series on Washington’s four quadrants continues with a focus on Northeast, an area with connections to the railroad and public markets, as well as education, social change, a president, and a neighborhood once known as Swampoodle. This lecture features President Lincoln's Cottage.

Friday, April 29, 2016 at 1:00 PM

D.C. was expected to be the “model dry city” during Prohibition. No way. There were about 3,000 speakeasies and even Congress employed its own bootleggers. Discover the quirky and little-known “monuments” to Prohibition on a walking tour in town.

Saturday, April 30, 2016 at 7:45 AM

The beautiful Brandywine region is the ideal destination for lovers of art, grand houses and gardens, American history—and used books. Join Hayden Mathews, an environmental and cultural history interpreter, on an overnight tour and discover why.

Saturday, April 30, 2016 at 9:30 AM

Historian Stephen Engle revisits five pivotal Civil War battles—First Bull Run, Shiloh Antietam, Gettysburg, and Vicksburg—to determine if their historical significance as the war’s turning points over the past 150 years still holds.

Wednesday, May 4, 2016 at 12:00 PM

The new lunchtime lecture series on Washington’s four quadrants continues with a focus on Northeast, an area with connections to the railroad and public markets, as well as education, social change, a president, and a neighborhood once known as Swampoodle. This lecture features the Sewall-Belmont House.

Friday, May 6, 2016 at 7:30 AM

Staff from the Jamestown Rediscovery project share the eloquent archeological story of life and death in North America’s first permanent British settlement during a visit to this fascinating research site.

Wednesday, May 11, 2016 at 12:00 PM

The new lunchtime lecture series on Washington’s four quadrants continues with a focus on Northeast, an area with connections to the railroad and public markets, as well as education, social change, a president, and a neighborhood once known as Swampoodle. This lecture features Historic Swampoodle.

Back to the top


 

Explore National Parks with Smithsonian

 

Share/Save